Well I feel pretty stupid

I just bought Maxwell, and it doesn't look like I can even use it unless I
have SW2006 ! I have 2005.
The Maxwell pdf manual doesn't even say how to use it with a sldprt file.
Does maxwell run from within SW like PW?
Was I sucked in by a cool demo again??
Reply to
Bill Chernoff
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Hmm- that might well be, since 2006 has a camera that would make it compatible with rendering plugins in the industry
Reply to
parel
Maxwell needs 2006, for the camera. I have my PC dual booting so I can do real work in SWX 2005 and then boot into SWX2006 to render.
After hitting the render button on the Maxwell plug-in it generates a mxs file that renders in a pop up window. Or you can render the mxs that it generates from the command line. There will be a GUI when it's released next month.
Note you can also link up to four PC's /CPU's to enable cooperative rendering, with one Maxwell licence. I've only done it with 2 PC's so.
Login to Maxwell's SolidWorks forum and get Juan's Tutorial video's. and read the Install "sticky". It's also worth reading the stuff in the general tutorial forum especially the bit regarding "Avoid High Reflectance (updated with plastics" unless you have infinity to render your parts.
If you have any questions, Juan or another Maxwell employee will answer on the forum within a day, usually. Juan is the guy who is programming the SolidWorks Plug-in.
It is possible to render inside a part file but you are limited to the "physical sky" that's built into Maxwell for lighting. The best way is to set up an assembly and assign emitters to parts to illuminate the scene. Maxwell does not use SolidWorks lighting.
I have set up a standard studio assembly with 2 lights which I drop parts or assemblies into to render them. If you are interested, after you install SWX2006, I'll post the "very" basic studio assembly I have made on my website for you to download?
If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to help.
The SolidWorks Plug-in is still Alpha and Maxwell is still Beta hence it?s currently half price.
Regards
John Layne
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Reply to
John Layne
John, Thanks very much for your inforamtion and offer to help.
The other day I was trying to get a simple part rendered for use in our next advertisment. After about 1/2 hour with PW, I could see the learning curve was going to be painful. I decided it would be quicker to go down to the shop and machine the part from aluminum, and take a photo, than it would be to get a good image out of PW. So, bitter on PW, I remembered seeing someone's very nice looking rendering of a medical-looking part on this newsgroup, and remembered it was created using Maxwell. Off to the web site, saw the Solidworks mention and whipped out the credit card.
I can rationalize the expense of going to SW06 by factoring in the early-adopter discount on Maxwell. ;-)
Bill
Reply to
Bill Chernoff
The learning curve could be also be quite steep for Maxwell. Some of the PhotoWorks interface is a lot easier than Maxwell.
I find the end results a lot less frustrating than PhotoWorks. Plus for me at least they are more predicable once you get to know what it can do.
I'm far from being an expert and I'll never spend the time on Maxwell to produce those sorts of renders you can see in their gallery. My main aim is to produce renders that help my customers foresee the final product. But I'm happy to share the little knowledge I have.
John Layne
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Reply to
John Layne
I'd be happy to render it for you, I could use the practice?
John Layne
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Reply to
John Layne

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