American Flyer Rolling Stock

I did a Google search and just ended up confused.
Can an American Flyer boxcar run on Lionel's O gauge track? Obviously I
know S gauge is two-rail, but what about the rolling stock. Are they compatible?
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Spender wrote:

no wrong size
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Chuck Kimbrough wrote:

Gauge & scale are vastly different when talking about toy trains.
Many Lionel items are close to 3/16" scale, or "S" scale, running on "O" track. Just prior to WWII, Flyer was marketing 3/16" scale trains for three rail "O" gauge track.
The gauge is not the same for Postwar Flyer, which is 3/16" scale running on two rail "S" gauge track. The bulk of Lionel production is three rail "O". Prewar Flyer runs just fine on Lionel "O".
Want to confuse the issue even more? Lionel has been cataloging & producing "S" gauge American Flyer train items since the 1970's. They acquired Flyer in 1967 just before Lionel Corp got out of the train business themselves & licensed the manufacturing.
The corporation then sold the licenses too in the '90s. It's all owned by Wellspring now.
Rob
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wrote:

I recall reading something about Neil Young being a major investor who pulled Lionel out of the last bankruptcy. Is Wellspring the company he funded?
I wonder what makes the business so unstable. Too small a market requiring high prices? Too much time playing with the trains instead of running the business? To much time in court with MTH?
I've heard two areas of faith in the latter. Some say MTH will buy out Lionel, and some say Lionel will buy out MTH.
Either way, the Lionel name has to stay. It's ingrained in the American consciousness.
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Spender wrote:

Neil Young is a small minority investor w/ Wellspring. None of them "pulled Lionel out of the last bankruptcy"... it was a court decision.
Young also has interests in the firm that provides technology to Lionel - LionTech.

Assuming facts not in evidence.
Too small a market requiring

Niether of these will happen, the way Lionel is structured.

Rob
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trainfan1 spake thus:

... which stems from the fact that Young's son is developmentally disabled, and Young discovered toy trains assisted with his treatment, thereafter taking a great interest in Lionel.
--
Don't talk to me, those of you who must need to be slammed in the
forehead with a maul before you'll GET IT that Wikipedia is a
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

and Young discovered toy trains assisted with his treatment,

Both of his sons, Zeke & Ben, have CP. His daughter does not.
Neil's interest in trains, Lionel in particular, predates the birth of Ben(1978), the one who is most severely affected, & Zeke(1972).
Rob
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On Fri, 16 Feb 2007 17:36:12 -0800, David Nebenzahl

Now that's a great story. I doubt MTH has any such stories. Other than maybe a clandestine piece involving Mike walking out on Lionel and taking some designers - and apparently some designs - with him.
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wrote:

Yes, obviously the bankruptcy court's trustee pulls the company out of bankruptcy. I meant that he invested in creating the new company.

Several bankruptcies from the days of Joshua Cowen to the present. Not too stable.
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Spender wrote:

A minor investor, w/ Wellspring. This was in 1995, has nothing to do with any bankruptcy. There was no new company, they bought it in entirety from Richard Kuhn, who had recently acquired the licenses from Lionel Corp., while having owned the rights, & Lionel Trains Inc., & had been making trains, for 10 years.

This last one had nothing to do with stability, it was the result of the MTH lawsuit verdict.
Rob

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wrote:

I don't consider a 20% stake to be minor.
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Spender wrote:

Well, then math is obviously not your strong suit.
BUT, then again, 50% of California secondary school students are performing below average.
And of course, fully 4/5 of San Diego area residents have demonstrated difficulty w/ fractions.
Rob
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wrote:

Then I guess you'd consider owning 20% of GE to be just a minor thing...
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Spender wrote:

Well, then math is obviously not your strong suit.
BUT, then again, 50% of California secondary school students are performing below average.
And of course, fully 5/4 of San Diego area residents have demonstrated difficulty w/ fractions.
Rob
(& I have difficulty even quoting myself)
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wrote:

125% of San Diego area residents have demonstrated difficulty with fractions? Umm, okay. Too bad Neil Young didn't get 125% ownership of Wellspring...
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snipped-for-privacy@Mars.org wrote:

In the old days, toy trains were made in the USA or imported from a few manufacturers in Europe at great cost.
Today, the vast majority of the toys are made in China. This means prices can be very cheap relative to what they might have been.
To be popular with the mass toy market, it means being cheap and not necessarily very good quality.
To be popular with the collectors and layout operators, it means having collector quality products and many of those would prefer they be made in the same old USA factory that they always had been.
Thus, these manufacturers are pulled in two different directions.
LGB attempted to solve the problem by creating two lines of products: a battery powered plastic track train that was aimed at the children's market (are they still making that?), and the hobbyist trains we all know of. Both could operate on the metal track, and rolling stock had similar enough couplers that some types of rolling stock were shared between the two product lines.
However, the toy market is a volatile thing, particularly with such heavy hitters as Mattell doing mass marketing to children every moment they watch TV.
--
-Glennl
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" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

I think the plastic track and battery trains disappeared 30 odd years ago. More recently LGB introduced their 'toy line' which uses products produced in China, running on LGB track.
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It has been that long ago hasn't it? I still have a 1981 LGB catalog somewhere (the only one I ever owned) that had the plastic track trains in it.
In O27, there was Lionel, and there was Marx. For a while in the 1970s, Marx made a version of its locomotive with a wind-up mechanism and plastic track. This would also operate on the same O27 track as their electric trains.
This type of thing strikes me as being a good way of introducing a toy that can be upgraded slowly into an adult hobby.
--
-Glennl
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" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

Time flits by when you're having fun!

The Chinese have that segment of the market well sewn up - I just bought a New Bright set, R/C 2-6-0 + tender, 3 wagons and an oval of track new for NZ$45 (US$30)
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 02:31:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) wrote:

That seems to be why Lionel makes low cost (well, around $200) starter sets. Then you open their catalog and see $2000 locomotives.
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