Anyone tried printing onto Plasticard?



I use balsa strips for bracing my cardboard (e.g. Metcalfe) buildings. Available from good model shops.
--
Martin S.

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I no longer use Balsa as it is a rain forest hardwood, milled non-sustainably I am told..... but I understand the principles.
Cheers
Steve
wrote...

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I was blissfully ignorant of that. What is the alternative, e.g. for model plane builders?
--
Martin S.

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Hi martin, I guess I don't know for planes as weight is a critical factor. Corflute and foam board come to mind immediately. Don't know what else though.
wrote:

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The first rule of paper or card model making is to use 3 or odd numbers of layers, for the same reason that ply wood is always made of odd numbers of layers, the layers tend to counter warping. Second rule is that you MUST seal the surfaces - shellacing was the normal method in the past, but some artists sprays should have the same effect. With those two techniques, paper models should be robust enough to have a long life where they are not directly handled.
Regards, Greg.P.
mindesign wrote:

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FWIW I have paper and cardstock models on my layout that are over 50 years old and still holding up fine.
Don
-- snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net http://www.geocities.com/don_dellmann moderator: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com moderator: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com moderator: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com co-moderator: snipped-for-privacy@Yahoogroups.com http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MRPics http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintageHO

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On Sun, 2005-08-07 at 15:30 +0000, Trainman wrote:

How do they look visually next to the plastic ones? I'm speaking in terms of how they appear next to each other. I'm sure they're are different, but do they "blend" well together, or is there a huge noticeable difference when they are put next to each other? Being of different textures could be interesting, but do they stick out like sore thumbs, or need to be kept segregated from the plastic ones?
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wrote:

    It depends on the model and how it was designed.     I have some paper buildings which cam not be set next to highly detailed plastics as they are FAR more realistic since they were designed using the actual photographs of the building and those photos sport a level of detail no human is capable of reproducing. Others look easily the equal of my plastic/resin kits and are only distinguishable by their weight. then i have some which are hand drawn and while lovely art they really would not work on a layout.     Basically a lot depends on how much detail you put in your plastic buildings. there are paper models which can match that. You may have to look to find which ones duplicate your realism level but you can find them. Personally I like to use several levels of details to give more depth to the layout.
cat
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Hi Cat
I'd love to see some pics
- haven't seen much of interest on the paper modelling site other than a lot of space ships, but I haven't had time to really dive into (or maybe I am at the wrong one!)
Steve

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On Tue, 9 Aug 2005 07:14:59 +1000, "mindesign"

    At papermodels at SmartGroups we just had several cars, a number of figures and several skyscrapers listed as well as Pino's amazing mechanical paper device (which took a major award at an European engineering show). A few weeks ago we had a ton on HO and N scale truck trailers listed. there are a number of paper model groups but papermodels at SmartGroups is the largest and most active. come check it out. (did I forget to mention the UFO in a carpark we just listed?)
                                cat
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http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MRPics http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintageHO
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wrote:

    I have seen paper models over 100 years old which look fine. However conditions have a lot to do with longevity. If you live in a high humidity area and your layout is not in a humidity controlled area, you should brace walls as even wood will buckle in the moist conditions. Modern card stock is much tougher than the old papers use in the past and those used in the "punch out" books but if you buy "archival" level paper stock the paper will last centuries. the next problem is ink. All inks will fade in direct sunlight. since few of us have layouts hit by such light that is not a problem for us (though fluorescent lights do cause any pigmentation to fade be it ink or paint or molded in colour) So the inks should last as long as any other paint. Basica;lly if you avoid high humidity and bright light paper will last as well as any other material you can model with.
                            cat
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Any suggestions as to the type of glue to use when using paper and expecting a few years life from paper models. My experience is the 'contact' type adhesives 'leech' thru to the surface, and shrink and distort paper after a few months, and water based ones either fail to stick at all to 'archival' type papers ( which seem to have a plasticky finish) or distort imediately..
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wrote:
.

    Personally I use "carpenter's" or "cabinetmaker's" glues. They are a yellow toned (but dry clear) glue that is like a thicker "white" glue (like Elmer's). I use it sparingly as it can get messy but it holds tenaciously and will last for many years.      A lot like the "white" glues but I find they have too much water in them and can cause problems when attaching fine parts.     Another good glue, especially when you want things to bond fast, is "Alien's Tacky Glue" which is found in "crafts" shops.
                                cat
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On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 20:18:36 +1000, "mindesign"

Yes I have. Some years ago I was making the base sides for a VLine VKEX wagon out of a single sheet of 0.5mm styrene sheet.
As it was cut to almost A4 size, and as I had drawn everything up in a CAD program I put the plastic through the inkjet printer to see how it went. As expected the ink balled, so I washed it off and tried again. From memory, I gave the surface a light sand with say 400 grit Wet & Dry sand paper. This worked batter, but not perfect, so I then went outside and gave the whole lot a spray with cheap matte spray from the local art supply shop. This worked well enough to enable me to cut out the sides, although I did have to sand off the coating before gluing.
Subsequent wagons have used the same artwork, but printed on paper then glue-sticked to the plastic before cutting/scribing.
For my artwork and some other comments see http://www.railtasmania.com/~sdix /
Regards,
Stuart
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Before I comment too deeply it would be good to know the application and the type of printer.
But.. That's not stopped me in the past.
I work for a hardware/lawn&garden company. We regularly print outside signs on plastic material for our plants, shrubs and fertilizer displays. Printers used are laser, not ink-jet. The plastic signs cards come from Horticultural Printers. They're web site is: http://www.horticulturalprinters.com /. Click the 'onsyte printing' tab. There is stock for thermal transfer, ink jet and laser. I don't know if any of this is usable in your application but it's worth a look. The whole idea for us is the ability to print signs that can withstand the weather. We don't do color, just black on the white card. Laser printers are all HP 4100 to 4200 series. We have had good luck with the combination.
And no, I have no connection with the above mentioned company!
Good luck,
Jim

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Any ALPS MD series printer will print on styrene up to 0.010" thick. It works really well. It is a thermal wax/resin transfer printer.
The only problem is that they are long out of production. Good news is that lots of them show up on eBay. But lots of the eBay ones have problems (like burned head elements).
Peteski
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BTW all
I am also going to try and inkjet print stone paper onto a textured card stock to see if I can achieve added realism ...... that'll be interetesing
:)
Steve

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On Mon, 01 Aug 2005 20:18:36 +1000, mindesign wrote:

Don't try this with a laser printer. We had some one wreck the 'fuser' on our office colour printer by putting the wrong sort of transparency film it it and the plastic melted in the fuser stage. The clear sheets meant for the printer can take much more heat.
Inkjet printers don't use heat to fuse the ink. The warning only applies to Laser printers.
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On Wed, 03 Aug 2005 07:28:33 +1000, Matthew Geier

Or you could just buy A4 labels and print onto them. Bit like the old Farish buildings. Even in N these look a lot better when you add relief detail though.
Regards
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