Best H0 system for newcomer?

David Nebenzahl wrote:


OK, but I rarely sell the one-offs, only the ones I have produced!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually you are wrong. You are a reseller if you do that. Please try to stick to subjects you know such as sockpuppets.
On Feb 19, 9:33?pm, STEVE CAPLErote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charles Davis wrote:

Hmmm, I'm an artist, a counsellor, a model maker ... in equal proportions. When people ask me what I do I usually pick the one closest to their inmterest.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Procter wrote:

[...]
Yeah, well, Greg, we all know you have your own notions of what words "really" mean. :-)
Of course you're a manufacturer. And I trust you've investigated your income tax regs so you can get a few tax credits here and there as a reward for your entrepreneurial activities.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wolf wrote:

Where did I use the word really in that last sentence you responded to?

Absolutely - and the profits pay for better equipment ... I figure by 2057 I'll actually make a taxable profit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not scholarly enough to be pedantic. "Cottage industries" describes the size/scale/magnitude of the effort not the category of the effort.

"I produce a few items ...", that's what a manufacturer does. If the only employee is the owner (even if the wages aren't what one might call a living wage) it makes no difference. So Greg, the manufacturer, employees himself, the artisan. Since it is on a small scale, and presumably, occurs in ones home/cottage (or out buildings that aren't zoned for industry), it could be thought of as a "cottage industry".

Paul
--
The lotto must be rigged, I should have won by now.
Modular furniture is cruel and unusual.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Greg , I can see why China, Hong Kong, Slovakia but which and why would a US firm have its models manufactured in Denmark or Spain. Wages in Spain are most likely the same as in the US and I'm pretty sure they're much higher in Denmark wich is financialy one of the best ( not biggest) countries in the world.
Greetz Jan
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users. It has removed 1001 spam emails to date. Paying users do not have this message in their emails. Try SPAMfighter for free now!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jan(Bouli)Van Gerwen wrote:

History. The models you allude to were first imported back in the 60s. I suppose the dies are still OK, so they're still used.

The Danes for some strange reason don't think it's proper to pay their CEOs 200 times what they pay their workers, so the actual costs aren't as high as a comparison of wages would make it seem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very true Wolf, hadn't thought of that, I should have because its the same here in Holland. But I don't think the CEO of a Model Train manufacturer makes 10 million a year :-)
Greetz Jan
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users. It has removed 1003 spam emails to date. Paying users do not have this message in their emails. Try SPAMfighter for free now!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wolf wrote:

Heljan is steadily turning out new models - I'm guessing that many of those Walthers short runs are from Heljan and they are making their presence felt in the UK market 1with high quality models that are competitive with Chinese products. They are even doing a few models for the Danish market!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jan(Bouli)Van Gerwen" wrote:

Heljan produces all sorts of models for the US market (Walthers) as well as Britain and Europe. They seem currently to be able to compete with China etc. It's first thing in the morning now and I'm not sufficiently awake to remember why I wrote Spain - something is produced there that I see advertised in the US market.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now that Hornby has taken over, where is Rivarossi produced? I assume the factory in Italy closed years ago and I think the Yugoslavian plant got destroyed in the war.
I think for a while some of Electrotren's products were winding up here in North America, but I think they were all European prototype equipment.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

From what I read, Hornby bundled everything off to China. Most items need some retooling to some degree to fit new Chinese motors etc etc but I think some Rivarossi must be in US shops by now.

Trains, yes, but they also do accessories and those probably end up in the US with US labels.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was thinking they had some figures or automobiles or structures that wound up here, but I couldn't find any of that listed on their web site.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Slowly the memory is coming back. I think it was some working streetlights or traffic signals or some such that I saw here in the USA with the Electrotren name on the package, but that must have been about 10 years ago now.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tor_arne snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Thanks in part to NMRA standards and part to luck, US HO equipment from all manufacturers will interoperate. The couplers match, the track fits together and every thing runs and stays on the track, all the power packs will power all the locomotives. You can buy rolling stock from Athearn, Model Power, Accurail, Atlas, Kadee, Kato, IHC, Bachmann. Proto2000, Proto1000, Red Caboose, whoever, and it will run on your track and couple with your other rolling stock. All HO power packs will run all HO locomotives. You can buy flex track, Snap Track and turnouts from Atlas, Kato, Shinohara, and Model Engineering and they will fit together. All NMRA DCC systems interoperate, the powerpacks talk to all the decoders. Quality of everything is good enough to get started with. Rolling stock, track, accessories and power packs all work. After you have been railroading for a while you will find that some models are nicer than others, they conform more closely with the prototype, the paint jobs and lettering look better, they have more details. Usually, but not always, the nicer models cost more. As long as the model looks right to you, it is a good model, and you will enjoy owning it and running it. With the exception of brass models, there is little collecting of HO models and the resale value of an HO model is usually less than the value of a brand new one. You can browse the hobby shop shelves and purchase what seems good to you without going wrong. To get going, you only need a bit of track, a power pack, a locomotive, and a few cars. Set up the track, connect the power pack, and run the train. Read a few Model Railroader magazines. Later you can return to the hobby shop to buy more track, rolling stock, whatever. For your first train I would go with the simplier DC powerpacks, and leave DCC for later.
David Starr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Starr wrote:

You're forgetting the forty-five years of the non-NMRA XP-2 (or whatever) that was standard but didn't work which lasted until Kadee's patent lasped.

Try joining Atlas and Bachmann or Lifelike!

You haven't tried Bachmann or Lifelike or ...

With the exception of Maerklin ...

Same for Europe.

After you switch the DCC decoder in Aethern or Atlas.

All depends - model or geometric?

Except ...

There's plenty of rubbish!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Procter wrote:

The horn-hook coupler (Xf2 or NMRA coupler) has been gone for about ten years now. New kits or RTR rolling stock are universally equipped with a Kadee clone knuckle coupler. Rolling stock equipped with the horn hook couplers does still appear at train shows (model trains last forever), in which case, Kadee makes knuckle couplers to fit everything ever made.

As long as you stick to straight track (rails and a tiestrip) they fit. The track plus roadbed thingies from different makers nfortunatly don't fit together.

Actually I have a little of both and they work for me.

Maerklin is a European brand. Most folk do not think of Maerklin when speaking of American HO equipment.

In casual conversation, "power pack" means a straight DC only power pack, where as DCC is spoken of as "DCC". All locomotives will run on straight DC. My recommendation is to begin with straight DC operation and only consider DCC later.

Both sorts mate with snaptrack or flex track.

Different strokes for different folks. The point I was trying to make is that a beginner need not fear buying equipment off the shelf. Buy what ever and take it home and it will run.
David Starr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Starr wrote:

On that basis any track of 16 to 17mm gauge will work with any other ;-)

I've seen some dodgy models from those brands - the same models are still in the latest Bachmann catalogue!

It's not my field but I'm sure from MR reviews at least one major brand needs a slide switch on the decoder thrown to convert between DC and DCC. That's no problem to you or I but to the beginner opening the box for the first time it could spoil Christmas afternoon!

Most beginners want to lay an oval of track - a 10" #6 turnout will neither fit opposite an 8" snap-track straight nor replace an 18" radius curve - it doesn't fit.

$10-$20 locos, cars with loose couplers, steel rails and nasty transformer controllers might work straight from the box, but they may also put the beginner off the hobby inside a month whereas a few more dollars spent on a reasonable quality set has a much better chance of providing a decent start.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Procter wrote:

snip
That would be true, but I don't think THAT decoder comes in any 'sets'. That was a review of an 'add in' decoder for 'the knowledgeable modeler' to use at his discretion for conversion/replacement. In which case, if he couldn't understand the need for and meaning of the instructions, then he was over his head, and should seek help.

RIGHT ---- Except --- #6 switch ? NOT a sectional track item. Sectional Track 'Snap Switch' Hey, it fits!!!! (IF the curve was being done with 'sectional track'.)

This has been true for years, going back to the 1950s and even before. Same comments true then as now.
Chuck Davis

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.