Best N-scale code 100 turnouts

I've been using Atlas turnouts forever, using the Caboose Industries sprung throws to hand operate them, on a display module I take to
train shows.
But the points seem to be causing problems (i.e., derailments), so I want to replace them all. Because it is a display module for running trains I want to continue to use code 100 rail.
Any thoughts on what would be a good alternative? And maybe Atlas has improved theirs over the years (the ones on the module date from 1980-90).
Thanks in advance.
g.
-------------------------------------------- Never criticize another until you've walked a mile in his shoes. That way you'll be a mile away and have his shoes.
--------------------------------------------
For email reply, try jwudgy at tds dot net and you'll get through.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@SooLineFan.Net wrote:

[...]
Erm, Atlas makes code 80 and code 55 track in N gauge, not code 100.
I have found Atlas turnouts to be reliable. If yours have been in place for 20 years or more, they may need through cleaning, etc. For example, they may not throw all the ay over because of dirt, and that will certainly cause derailments. The main advantage of replacing the old turnouts with new ones from Atlas is that they will fit.
If your rolling stock also dates from 1980-90, then I think you need to replace it, or at least the trucks. Wheels have improved a lot in the last 15-20 years. Engines even more so. Do you clean the wheels regularly? Dirt can build up on wheels and that's alwys a problem, even in larger scales.
If you want another manufacturer's product, you will have to do more than just replace the turnouts, as the measurements are different.
Other makers of sectional track. Unless otherwise noted, all offer a variety of radii, turnouts, and crossings.
Bachmann: plastic ballast base, good stuff.
Kato: code 80 on plastic base with brown ties and "gravel" coloured ballast. Bhe best sectional track, but pricey.
LifeLike: also on plastic ballast base, not compatible with Kato. Good stuff. Also makes standard track and flex track.
Model Power: code 80 track. 9-3/4" radius. Like Atlas.
Micro Engineering: code 70, 55, and 40 flex track and turnouts, in silver or weathered (brown) rail. The best flex track. Also offers rail.
Peco: code 80 and 55, good stuff. Also makes flex track.
The plastic ballast based tracks are not compatible with each other. You will find more details in the Walthers N & Z catalog for 2008. Find it at your friendly neighbourhood hobby shop.
HTH
--
wolf k.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yup, you're right. I was thinking of the HO Atlas code 100. Sorry. Code 80 it is in N scale.
All of my rolling stock and engines have been converted over to Kadee wheelsets and couplers (at the time it WAS Kadee as this was before the spinoff into MicroTrains). Engine wheels are cleaned regularly, but I've not found a great solution for cleaning the plastic wheels of the Kadee wheelsets short of rolling the car back and forth over a cleaning solution impregnated paper towel.
Your comment about the dimensions of the different brands of turnouts is probably a clincher for me as I do not really want to have to redo all of the track leading up to the turnouts.
Thank you for your thoughts.
g.
-------------------------------------------- Never criticize another until you've walked a mile in his shoes. That way you'll be a mile away and have his shoes.
--------------------------------------------
For email reply, try jwudgy at tds dot net and you'll get through.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it is locos that are derailing, then check the wheel gauge to make sure they're neither too tight nor too wide. I've found that many N scale locos are a little under gauge, and will perform a lot more reliably with just a little adjustment.
Also, if you're using the old ribbed-back Kadee wheelsets on your freight cars, they can also get out of gauge.
Regards, Ron
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.