Magic mask? Any experience.

I am learning to paint undecorated units with my airbrush and currently have
a SD60 ready to be painted in CSX scheme. As far as masking has anyone used
the magic mask stuff where you paint it on and then your able to peel it off
when your done? How well does that work? Also what is the proper way to mask
and paint? Light colors first then on with darker ones?Any special tape?
Reply to
Matthew
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Matthew --
I love this stuff. It works great and peels off easily. I've used it on my steam locos to mask off the area directly next to the cab windows; I then use masking tape for the bulk of the engine and am able to airbrush just the cab windows cleanly. I do the same with the smokebox.
I've never gotten as clean a line with masking tape. HOWEVER, because it has to be painted on, it's tough to get a perfectly straight line. I suppose you could try applying masking tape, then painting the mask next to the tape, and cutting the mask along the tape to get a straight line.
Reply to
Gerry Leone
Liquid maskers are both a blessing and a curse.
All that follows assumes basic good painting technique. CLEAN all parts before painting, PRIME as needed. Let the paint DRY thoroughly before applying masking materials, or another layer of paint. Don't layer incompatible types of paint.
They are great for covering odd shapes with ZERO paint bleed-under. They can be used to mask irregular curved shapes (like military camouflage). They are worthless for cutting straight lines.
Normal technique is to cut all straight lines with conventional masking tape. This should be very narrow ... perhaps only 1/16 inch. You can cut the strips as needed on a sheet of metal or glass using a knife and straightedge. The narrow strips will conform to almost any curvature. Once the edges are thus defined, you can fill between the strips with the liquid masker. It will usually creep under the edges of the tape strips just enough to seal them from bleed-under. As a masker, this works GREAT! I've NEVER had liquid masker lift paint, unlike any tape I've ever tried (LOTS!). The narrow edge strips are also unlikely to lift paint ... there's just not enough adhesive in contact (usually).
Downsides:
The masker can react with some paint, especially if it's not THOROUGHLY dry. This can cause alligatoring, or color shifting, or blotching. The masker will sometimes leave a strange waxy deposit behind ... this can be difficult to remove.
Some liquid maskers are sold as "water soluble ... washes away". They sure do, with disastrous results! The masker, by definition, has a layer of paint on it. When it dissolves in the water that paint is released. By sheets or flecks, it will redeposit itself all over your model. It's near impossible to remove. Forget washing the masker away ... peel it.
Most of the maskers are some form of latex rubber. It has an amazing ability to 'crawl' into tiny openings. That's why it's so good a sealer from the paint. However, that feature can make it hard to remove. It adheres to every little crevice tenaciously. The main sheet will tear away (it has little strength) ,and leave little bits stuck here and these, anchored in holes and seams (steam loco boilers are especially good at providing anchor points for the rubber). To get them out you need a GOOD pair of tweezers and lots of patience. The rubber stretches when pulled on, like rubber bands. The rear end stays embedded in the hole as you pull on it. Finally, if you're lucky, it will snap out. It's like pulling micro worms out of holes. Time consuming, and sometimes frustrating.
So, The stuff works WELL, but can produce problems. You need to develop a technique with it, as with most other things. Once you get the hang of it, you can get some VERY nice paint jobs, but removing it will take some time. Occasionally you'll find yourself pounding your head on the wall, but that's true of most any masking system. However, few things in model building are so annoying as to finish a complicated paint scheme, then have the masking tape lift off big sheets of the paint. THAT, at least, just won't occur with the liquid maskers.
Dan Mitchell ==========
Matthew wrote: > > I am learning to paint undecorated units with my airbrush and currently have > a SD60 ready to be painted in CSX scheme. As far as masking has anyone used > the magic mask stuff where you paint it on and then your able to peel it off > when your done? How well does that work? Also what is the proper way to mask > and paint? Light colors first then on with darker ones?Any special tape?
Reply to
Daniel A. Mitchell
Paint the light colors first as they won't need as many coats to cover solidly. The Magic mask stuff is nice for what it does in very restricted areas but it does long straight lines poorly as it is hard to put on that way. I usually just peel and poke it off after spraying with toothpicks, tweezers and a magnifying glass. The stuff can be a bit electrostaticey in action when removing.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works every time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
I've used the "frisket" sold in art stores. It rubs off with a pencil eraser. Not a perfect product, but it does better than anything else I've tried to mask off brick walls from window trim.
I just bought some "Micro Mask" to see how it compares. I hope it's as good or better, it's a lot cheaper than frisket.
Reply to
Larry Blanchard

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