My Atlas Code 55 experience so far...

... I'm getting frustrated. After buying 100 pieces of flex
I'm starting to wonder if it's worth it (from Code 83) It seems VERY
flimsy, and when I'm creating very long curves the ties get crooked
and the ends get out of guage. The "moving" rail doesn't seem to move
as well thus creating the problem.. Any thoughts?
Reply to
Kevin Miller
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I haven't had too many problems with it- it is lighter weight, but that's expected from the closer-to-scale parts.
I solder them in groups of three or so, so maybe that helps- strength in numbers. Problem is the smaller ties melt so darned fast!
When I did a few major curves I would end up with an inch or so of rail w/out ties ( to account for the displacement of the rail joiners) but these did not go out of gauge. If you are careful enough, there shouldn't be any problems. -TG
Reply to
Tim Gill
The difficulty in curving the lightweight flex is typical. The ties need to be nudged into position pretty much throughout the entire length of track. And once it is curved it doesn't really want to ever go straight again. It takes some getting used to but it isn't really a problem.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
That has been my experience as well with the ME code 55, but not at all with the Atlas. I built two Bend-Track balloon modules last summer using the code 55, and had absolutely no difficulty in curving the track _or_ straightening it. The Atlas track is MUCH easier to work with in that regard than the ME code 55.
Now, if you're painting it first... -- Joe Ellis ? CEO Bethlehem-Ares Railroad - A 1:160 Corp. ___a________n_mmm___mmm_mmm_mmm___mmm_mmm_mmm___mmm_n______ ___|8 8B| ___ /::::: / /::::X/ /:::::/ /:::::/|| ||__BARR| | | /::::::/ /:::::X /:::::/ /:::::/ || ---------------------------------------------------------------- [(=)=(=)=(=)=(=)] |_________________________| [(=)=(=)=(=)=(=)] =============Serving America's Heartland Since 1825=============
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Reply to
Joe Ellis
ME flex track can be fun as the rails don't move as easily as the other brands that the rails are inserted into the finished plastic casting. The trick is to work it a bit and when you work it you try to do large lengths to the curve without the localized stresses that tend to kind of kink the track. Some have also used stuff like WD-40 and so forth to lubricate the rails so that they move easier. There are some metal curve templates that fit between the rails that can help with curving the track if you want to go that way. BTW, if you want to make the ME track straight again, straighten as best you can and then whack the ties on edge against a table and it will usually become quite straight. I'll note that as long as the spikes are over the rail base, the ties will control the gauge of the track so keep the ties perpendicular to the rails and cut off any extending ends as they will not be in gauge unless you do something special like curving them to the next piece of track.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works every time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
Did you ever see pictures of a real railroad? Their ties aren't straight either. I purposely try to twist some so it won't look so perfect.
Reply to
Charles Callaghan
Ties at 20 degrees from others isn't normal yet I've seen some model railroads that seem to think that the ties are scattered across the roadbed and rails attached. Even round logs with flats on them for the rails tended to be laid fairly parallel to each other on logging railroads even if the logs weren't quite straight.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works every time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
Thanks people, I'm getting better at it now... I think some of the Atlas track was bent to begin with and is basically worthless...
Reply to
Kevin Miller
I'm building my first N scale layout and I'm using the Atlas code 55. I really like the look of it especially since I painted it all rail brown. I would suggest to anyone who wants to paint the track before laying it (like I did) to pre-bend some of the pieces you will be using for cureves as once the paint dries it pretty much "welds" it in place and it becomes much more difficult to bend.
Reply to
Max Coynes

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