Q: Roof Walk Lumber Sizes?

On Fri, 21 Apr 2006 01:26:29 -0700, David Nebenzahl


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Thanks. Direct answers are appreciated, not bafflegab about Google searches when I don't know what the "H" in "HRR" stands for so it can be searched upon. People who blindly point to Google as if it were a Rosetta Stone for everything are at best foolish.
Whoever commented about the web site is quite correct. Had to drill through three pages to find out its in Michigan. To me, Genesee County is upstate New York.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 16:42:27 -0700, Jim McLaughlin wrote:

I didn't know what it was, either. "HRR railroad" yielded a hit under historical societies that had Huckleberry Railroad, and thence to the Michigan site, and only from there to that somewhat blah county recs site.
Of course, it takes a little reading, a little search refinement, but life isn't like those movies where the hero types in "Search secret database" on a 40 character screen and immediately gets detailed info on the bad guys.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Sorry to have started the confusion, but the "HRR" issue first appeared was an outgrowth of another thread in which I'd previously been discussing the Huckleberry RR. I assumed (dumb) that most readers would thus be familiar with the abbreviation. I can see where it would be confusing if you started in the middle of the thread. Hopefully that's now cleared up.
Dan Mitchell ===========
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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

Lots of people make that mistake. The Genesee County area in Michigan, also known as the Genesee Valley, is a bit south of Saqinaw Bay (the pocket between the 'hand' and 'thumb' of Michigan). The area was originally settled by folks from New York, who apparently thought it looked something like home. One of the ancestors of the present "Mid-Michigan Railway Historical Society" was the "Genesee Valley Model Railroad Engineers" (now defunct, or better, evolved). Every time we went to a convention everybody thought we were from New York!
Dan Mitchell ===========
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Boy oh boy. I guess that I didn't read between the lines and assumed that you were talking about HO scale stuff!
Sorry
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Norm Dresner wrote:
> Despite the way they're typically modeled, especially on N- & > HO-gauge models, freight car roof walks wouldn't very likely have > been made from car-length boards (36'-40') but rather butted > end-on-end from shorter lumber. Based on drawings in the Train Shed > Cyclopedia, it looks like each longitudinal roof walk was composed of > three parallel boards, each ~6"-7.5" wide [I'd guess 2x6 or 2x8 > lumber was used]. But what's the practical length limit of the > individual boards? These days we can usually get 2xsomethingx16' > boards at the local lumber yard. Would this have been typical in, > say, 1900-1920?
G'day Norm,
The dimensions for wooden running boards were set by the Safety Appliances Act of 1911. They were to be at least 18" wide, and were typically 1x6 boards with an inch gap between the individual boards, giving a 20" wide running board. I have no idea what the practical length limit would be, but I note that various industry publications of the period advocate using less than full car-length boards. The rationale of this being that if a portion of the board was damaged, it could be replaced without having to replace the entire 40' length.
All the best,
Mark.
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