SF Broadway-Limited 4-8-4

Is the paint job on this model correct or did Broadway-Limited take a short
cut and only half paint the model?
The engine itself is an oily or grimy black, but the driving wheels appear
to be unpainted jet black plastic.
The tender is also oily or grimy black, but the under frame which includes
the steps at the four corners and the rear end sill also appear to be
unpainted jet black plastic.
I find other things annoying but not as much as the above. The headlight
does not stay into the smoke box front causing light to leak out between the
headlight casting and the smoke box. Why no engineer and fireman in the cab
(yes I can easily add them) of this $300 locomotive when $100 locomotives
can afford to include them.
I have remapped the outputs to the function keys that I want and had no
problems with the unit operating. I dislike the fact that I cannot map the
bell to the same function key as my Soundtraxx locos. Soundtraxx does not
allow the whistle/horn to be mapped any higher than F2 while Quantum does
not allow the Bell any higher than F3. Since my Soundtraxx units have the
whistle at F2, This leaves F0,1,3 for the 3 lighting outputs on my other
decoders. These outputs also cannot be set higher than F3. This makes be
set the Soundtraxx bell to F4 (or higher) but the Quantum bell cannot be set
to F4(or higher)
Stuart Sabatini
Palm Coast,FL
Reply to
Stuart Sabatini
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So far everyone has missed the most glaring defect. What is a Westinghouse cross-compound air pump doing under the fireman's side of the cab?
Reply to
PEACHCREEK
Buy a cheap piece of junk and you get junk, no matter how expensive it is. I suspect that the air pump under the cab is supposed to be a coal screw engine. I haven't seen the model but that much for a plastic model is silly when you can get a more accurately modeled brass model for about the same price.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works every time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
Perhaps it is meant to be a representation of the stoker motor?
But, as an interesting footnote, there was a class of 2-8-2s belonging to the MoPac that DID have their air compressors underneath the cab...
Reply to
Mark Newton
Westinghouse
And here I thought it was the OSHA foot massager....
Jim Stewart
Reply to
Jim Stewart
Broadway Limited will be attending the Timonium Great Scale Train show next weekend. I'm sure most of their models will be on display. These folks put out a wonderful product and are quite eager to talk about them and field comments. I most definitely would recommend stopping by their booth. I'm a brass guy, but I find myself operating many of their locomotives. Check out our site
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for show details. Best... HZ Howard Zane 5236 Thunder Hill Road Columbia, MD 21045 410-730-1036
Reply to
Howard Zane
Why would an oil-fired 4-8-4 need a stoker motor? :-)
Reply to
Sean S
Pictures of the real 3751 seem to indicate there's some sort of air or feedwater heater pump in that very location.
Reply to
Sean S
snipped-for-privacy@aol.combatspam (Sean S) wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@mb-m14.aol.com:
Aw! Now why would you go and inject reality into what might have become a good flame war? Want to take any bets on the number of people who totally ignore your post and keep right on arguing the matter?
Reply to
Woodard R. Springstube
Flame War? Who said anything about a flame war? I suspect that a cross compound air pump looks like a feedwater heater on a dark night at three hundred paces in a heavy rain, but for anyone who knows a little about steam locos it is a serious error. I will admit that there are fewer and fewer people who know a bit about steam locos, but I would hope that the manufacturers would know the difference. After all, it is supposed to be scale model, or is it a toy?
Reply to
PEACHCREEK
Does this photo help or confuse?
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CTucker NY
Reply to
Christian
SNIPS
I suspect that a cross
Way, way back when I had more hair, MR ran a series called "Basics of Steam". Being then younger and poorer, I am not at all sure that I ever did get all the issues of MR that covered the topic, and I have a gut feeling ( gut now bigger than when I had more hair --- it seems to be an inversely proportional relationship) that MR never concluded the series.
Anybody remember when (years/ months) the MR series ran?
Anybody have pointers to books about the subject -- how a steam locomotive operated? Basic 2 - 4 - 0 up to tender stoker coal fired behemoths?
Seems to me that there should be some good basic hobbyist affordable books out there, and a hell of a market if they are not out there.
Comments, suggestions?
Cites to steam theory books rte railroad locomotives ?
Reply to
Jim McLaughlin
>Does this photo help or confuse?
Reply to
Jon Miller
The tough part is, trying to find a clear enough picture of 3751 that shows exactly what it is the engine has hangin' down there. Since the 3751 class was modernized and rebuilt by ATSF with a different feedwater system than what many were delivered with, it's difficult to say what's where on the engine now ... barring, of course, good closeup photographs, accurate techinical drawings, or a personal looksee at the locomotive. The photo in the link another poster provided gives one of the best shots so far. From my rather limited prototype steam experience, it sure looks like an air pump to me.
But then, my experience is in coal-fired 2-8-0's, and not mainline oil burners... :-)
Reply to
Sean S
A fair question. I didn't realise the model was of 3751 in it's rebuilt form. It was delivered as a coal burner, along with it's thirteen classmates.
Photos and text in Worley's massive "Iron Horses of the Santa Fe Trail" confirm that one of the air compressors was eventually mounted under the cab.
(I should have looked at the book before posting!)
Reply to
Mark Newton
The engines as rebuilt had only two compressors, according to Worley. One remained on the pilot deck adjacent to the feedwater heater pump, the other was mounted under the cab.
Reply to
Mark Newton
Well, in this case the manufacturers got it right - the 3751 class as rebuilt carried an air compressor under the fireman's side of the cab.
Reply to
Mark Newton
SNIP
SNIP
Model Railroader Cycolpedia, Volume ((insert number here, there are 2, one for steam the other for diseasels)) has a basic discription of how a locomotive operated, what went where, what it did and why, and what all those pipes were for. Bill
Reply to
Bill Donahue
I know I should have stayed out of this! It really is an air pump. Wierd but correct. I never did understand Santa Fe steam.....................Sigh.............
Reply to
PEACHCREEK
Now if you want to see some weird steam look at C&O stuff................ok just kidding. VBG I still hope to get up to your store someday. No flame wars......unless they are oil fired.......LOL!!
Paul (an ATSF Fan)
Reply to
res0xur8

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