Thin Electronic Wire



If you are asking me if that figure is correct, I don't know.
Frank
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"Frank A. Rosenbaum" wrote:

Ok, so we're still not sure what US wire gauge is!
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You're partly right.
Increasing gauge numbers give decreasing wire diameters, which is similar to many other non-metric gauging systems. This seemingly-counterintuitive numbering is derived from the fact that the gauge number is related to the number of drawing operations that must be used to produce a given gauge of wire; very fine wire (for example, 30 gauge) requires far more passes through the drawing dies than does 0 gauge wire.
Note that for gauges 5 through about 14, the wire gauge is effectively the number of bare solid wires that, when placed side by side, span 1 inch. That is, 8 gauge is about 1/8 inches in diameter.
Cheers, John
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Craig, Trian Control Systems sell this type of wire go to tcs.com and check it out.
Malcolm NZ.

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Craig spake thus:

Don't know where to find it these days, but the stuff they used to wire phonograph arms with is very thin and flexible. (You could rip apart old turntables, I suppose.)
--
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of use of the word "fuck" is incapable of writing a good summary
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Craig wrote:

Just ask for "thin wire." ;-) Any thing in the range of AWG 24 to 28 is OK. (The larger the number, the finer the wire.)
Actually, you probably have salvageable thin wire around the house, if you are the average packrat.
Wire from old head phone cable is just fine for short flexible connections, as in a locomotive.
The wires in telephone cables are OK if flexibility is not much of an issue.
Atlas and other offer "hook up wire", which is just right for your purpose.
Keep in mind that fine wire has higher resistance, so should be used for short runs of a few inches at most.
You'll also need a good wire stripper, as it's easy to nick or cut through fine wire if using the craft knife to cut the insulation.
HTH
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Wolf
'Just because it's true doesn't mean it's the right answer.'
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Craig wrote:

Try e-bay and search for mil spec wire. I have seen 500 foot spools of 28 AWG wire relatively cheap.
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
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Not sure how thin you need it but I scrounge up old telephone cable (24 pair, color coded) every so often. There is a lot of fine wire in those cables but it is single strand.
dlm

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