Engine paint

Just wondering if one of the helpful people on here can point me in the
right direction when it comes to painting my B&S engine, what kind of paint
do you use? Hammerite, oil based gloss or is there a special kind? I'm in
the process of restoring a Wolseley Merry Tiller and any help would be much
appreciated
TIA, Andy
Reply to
Andy H
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You won't go far wrong with "Japlac" for the paintwork and "Potblack" for the cylinder casting and exhaust. I used that combination on several of my restorations and found them satisfactory.
Reply to
CHARLES HAMILTON
What sort of B&S is it? I assume you mean Briggs & Stratton. Roughly what colour is it now?
John
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Reply to
John Manders
Yes it's a 3hp Briggs & Stratton, made in 1966, the original colour looks to be bright red Cheers, Andy
Reply to
Andy H
Andy,
I use a series of paints from my local agricultural equipment supplier - oil based and intended for tractors etc. I wouldn't use Hammerite because, in my experience, it is not petrol proof. Japlac or Plasticote seem to work well. Hot bits (heads, exhausts etc.) require high temperature paints which are normally available from your local car spares shop and usually need to be cured - wait until the wife is out before putting the bits into the oven! I have heard of people using oil based Dulux etc. but I haven't and therefore cannot vouch for it. I assume cellulose car paints are probably OK as well.
Regards
Mark
Reply to
Mark Howard
Thanks for the advice, I will look into the agricultural paint idea. I've noticed the same thing with Hammerite, petrol just eats it.
Cheers, Andy
Reply to
Andy H
Use almost anything other than Hammerite (or Smoothrite). It's basically rubbish in every possible way. Impossible to apply well, except by spraying. Poor resistance to most solvents, including fuels. Poor water impermeability. No "body" to it, so it's demanding of surface preparation. Brittle, so it's prone to chipping if flexed. Poor adhesion, so it's prone to chipping under impact.
Use a good primer. A zinc-rich one (Davids 182 is good) for steel, alternative a red oxide primer for cast iron. Good cleaning (electrolysis or grit blasting) first and a phosphoric acid dip beforehand doesn't hurt if you can't de-rust it perfectly.
For trolleys etc. use a bituminous chassis paint (any colour that's black). This resists knocks better than a harder paint. You can get this, and the primers, from a truck parts factor, like Edmunds Walker.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
We use QD90 Machinery & Metal Paint from Blackfriars
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(go to Products then garden)
Heat resistant, high gloss, petrol and oil resistant and easy to use. I generally apply two coats of Finnigans No1 followed by two or more coats of QD90 rubbed down between coats. I have had no problems in past 10 years using this paint and would happily recommend. Slightly limited colour range but Landrover Green is ideal for Listers and Petters, Green ideal for Fowlers and the rest are standard reds, yellows etc. The basic colour range is enough for most of the engines that you would come accross.
Hope this helps. regards David
Reply to
David McC
My local agricultural supplies outlet (SCATS) keeps a range of oil-based Teamac paints. The red oxide primer is very durable and appears to be almost as good as topcoat. The colour range of topcoats is limited to those found on common agricultural items (Stoneleigh grey, landrover green, etc), but very durable.
In message , Andy H writes
Reply to
john. ambler
I repainted my 2 1/2 HP B&S a few years ago. The engine paint didn't need any attention but the tinwork did. I took the petrol cap into a car shop as a pattern and bought an aerosol of Ford Arizona Gold that was a perfect match. It worked well, has stood the test of about 5 years and still looks good. The advantages of the aerosol approach are a huge colour range and they're easy to apply. I actually did my repaint outside the caravan while on holiday. A green scourer pad and a sheet of wet and dry rubbed it down. Washing up liquid degreased it. A cheap set of small wire brushes from a market stall cleaned up the carburettor Hardly a major renovation but the improvement was quite dramatic. My engine is gold so I can't help with an exact match for your red.
John
Reply to
John Manders

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