Chinese caught redhanded botching quality

Apart from H3O (Deuteronium, also known as heavy water) of course, actually water is one of the most complicated molecues to say anything about, its the sort of question that can make chemists cringe as the answer has so many variables its almost impossible to answer.
Reply to
estarriol
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Jane Sullivan wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk:
OK how about if I change the word to the phrase, "the occasionally clear liquid tat comes from the tap" :-)
Reply to
Chris Wilson
In message , estarriol writes
Eh? Deuterium is an isotope of hydrogen, as is Tritium. Deuterium has one proton and one neutron, and Tritium has one proton and two neutrons. Their compounds with oxygen are still made up of two of these hydrogen isotopes to one of oxygen. They are sometimes written as D2O or T2O. It would be very difficult to get a compound of hydrogen and oxygen with 3 atoms of hydrogen to one of oxygen, as the valencies don't add up and there would be a spare electron left over somewhere.
That's only because its not wholly electrovalent and not wholly covalent.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
"simon" wrote
A plumber once told me that lead pipes were never a problem as their internal surface rapidly coated with either some oxide of lead or limescale.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"Kevin" wrote
Isn't it? What about the suppression of the investigation into BAe and the alleged bungs paid to some Saudi prince?
No-one has ever satisfactorily explained how Mark (son of Margaret) Thatcher made his millions.
Political donations for honours???
Rampant corruption, well maybe not, but again I definitely wouldn't claim we're whiter than white.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"Kevin" wrote
Each to their own idea of "rampant corruption". Whether it's by commission or omission, the fact remains that for the past decade we've been obsessed by low price, and have elevated it above every other criterion. You want it cheap, it's going to be shoddy on the whole. This isn't necessarily the inverse of overcharging for poor quality, which is also held to be a British obsession. People *know* why it's cheap, and roadside verges and tips are testaments to how little faith we put in material goods: buy it, sort-of-use it, chuck it. There's an entire parallel aesthetic of decent quality goods (in particular foods) in which we think we support our own and feel noble, but it's tripe because only the pious middle-class Guardian readers among us (including me) actually pay for it. Until consumer power involves actively shutting the wallet, walking away from the whining easy sell, and deciding in advance what's worth supporting, the containers of Chinese tat will continue to snake their way out of Harwich every afternoon and return empty (they usually come through my local station about teatime but since the river bridge broke we haven't seen them). Sit on your cash until Tesco go bust, then we can consider ourselves ethical citizens, not before.
RTR: mostly cheap imports. Kits: mostly artisan British products. So get your soldering irons out, patriots. I'd also agree with comments made elsewhere about lead: yes, objectively it's a toxin, but if you don't chew your models it won't hurt you. Probably rather more grief to be had inhaling MEK or flux or paint solvent fumes. Look on it as your necessary penance to spare some Chinese worker doing the same for your convenience ten hours a day because their economy's currently where ours was about 1870.
Tony Clarke, keen on modelling but also on joined-up politics
Reply to
Tony Clarke
Dont agree with much of what you say. There are good imports and bad, there are good artisan products and bad. Become a patriot and theres no incentive for British products to improve. Prefer to say just buy the best you can afford that does the required job. Many of us are happy with RTR, some try to build kits as well, but it takes me 6 months of enjoyable struggling per kit. Probably take 14 years to build a wobbly princess that may look closer to the results at Harrow than something zooming along West Coast main line.
Oh and I refuse to eat tripe.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Actually, they used lead oxide as a sweetener. It was called sugar of lead at one time in (al)chemical history. Or so I've been told.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Most of them went sterile as a result of their work.
Didn't the Romans also use something like white lead as a form of make up ?
Chris
Reply to
Dragon Heart
I guess if you're mad then sterility could be seen as a positive (?)
I think the makeup manufacturers still do.
Reply to
Greg Procter
They didn't live long enough to find out if there was a problem. Most of them probably died from colds, flu or pneumonia.
Reply to
MartinS

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