If ...

innews: snipped-for-privacy@w5g2000hsg.googlegroups.com:
We can have 6 digits on the side if you include multiple units although Southern region manages to identify its units by the last 4 digits careful not to overlap. No such luck with locos 87001, 67001, 47001, 37001, 27001 overlap on 4 digits admittedly less likely to overlap than 2 digits but you which which number manufactures are bound to pick for locos they make.
The one good point about the Hornby system is that you can allocate free text as well as an address to a loco, text held on command station. So you could map the full six digit loco number to a 1-255 address, which is probably more easy to use than remembering the last 4 digits and Bachmann are doing the same with their system. 4 digits were all that is required in the US as that is all the digits they use to identify locos with duplicates between different rail roads.
Reply to
Chris
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What a simple idea - like all the best. So ya boo sucks to those with thousands of addresses. Anyway what you going to do about private locos which may or may not have numbers !
Me ? I can use text.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Steve wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@l77g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:
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Yes it does, many thanks.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
See other reply for a much better method.
Here we have an example of an unfair rubbish claim. So how is 254 any stranger than 127, 99 or 9999. You may notice a relationship between 127 and 254. However how 127 relates to 99 or 9999 i do not know.
255 is hex FF or 1111 1111 in binary. So in digital terms very reasonable design choice. 127 is hex 7F or 111 1111 in binary - again reasonable in design terms.
99 and 9999 are perhaps more of 'human recognisable numbers', which may explain why they were chosen.
What next ? moan about the Elite cos it begins with an E ?
Simon
Reply to
simon
Whats it got to do with you ? Oh sorry, supposed to be answering your question, what was it now - IF - was there an engine called Rudyard Kipling ?
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
"simon" wrote
Yawn, was doing that two years ago with my ESU Mobile, and at leats that's totally NMRA compliant.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
But I'm not an astute buisiness man with millions to spare, i have to survive on a lowly salary. Its only now with Hornby's entry into the market that I've been able to afford a decent system.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Hornby "entered the market" years ago with an older system. Their "Zero 1" system was one of the first 2nd generation digital control systems marketed in the USA. It was being sold here in the 1980s when digital control systems were very much a niche market.
(What I think qualifies as the first generation system was a General Electric concoction that was made in the 1960s, and could be used to control all of 4 locomotives - it was a start, but not extremely popular.)
Reply to
gl4316
In message , simon writes
I'm surprised Tillig hasn't complained that Hornby has given something the same name as a their line of trackwork.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
"simon" wrote
Neither am I mate, but I can still tell the difference between a good product and an indifferent one. I joined the DCC revolution two or three years ago with an entry level Lenz Compact (cost at the time GBP75.00) which I still use. I've added peripherals to it as the opportunity arose, and my ESU Mobile was sourced secondhand on eBay.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Rubbish!
If you knew anything about the way DCC works, you would understand the significance of 127 being the upper limit for normal or "2 digit" addressing.
But not for DCC. You either use a single byte to store a normal address or two bytes to store an extended address. Trying to squeeze a bit of both into one byte is a strange design choice. It says to me that the designers were so short of memory that there is very little scope for future enhancements.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq
"simon" wrote
Report on DCCUK (Yahoo Group) today by a purchaser of three Hornby decoders (bought them because they were cheap) that he could not change the default 03 address on two of the decoders with his Roco DCC system. The third decoder worked fine.
I suppose that's another unfair rubbish claim from a Hornby customer?
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Even if that was the case it doesnt explain the logical relationship between 127 and 99.
And here was me thinking there are 8 bits to the byte and 4 bits to a nibble. 8 bits gives binary 1111 1111 and hex FF and decimal 256. If thats correct then the designers chose wisely.
Do correct me if have misunderstood. However pedants can keep quiet on the fact that a byte hasnt always been 8 bits cos for the last nn years it effectively has.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
OK, perhaps I should have qualified that with NMRA defined DCC. But then may need to state what NMRA stands for in case its confused with ......
Cheers, Simon
What am I saying Elite is NMRA compatible, sure am. So yeah, come on - i can take you all without showing fear. Just getting my coat but will be back with a different identity.
Reply to
simon
No idea John. Dont know him, dont know where he got them from, dont know what he or anyone else did with them, dont know anything about Roco. Dont feel any responsibility to defend Hornby or any other company at every turn. Just like to help out now and again including speaking out against obvious claims that may put people off enjoying something. However if you think it is another unfair rubbish claim then I wont argue against that.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Oh I can tell that difference as well. However youve confirmed my opinion of your business sense - i just cannot get anywhere with eBay. Some of the prices quoted and the amounts offered just dont seem reasonable to me.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
"simon" wrote
eBay is a wonderful facility if used properly. I use it to sell interesting items I know either won't sell in the shop, or won't command a realistic price. As an example I've just bought in five American diesel locos, all with DCC sound, which I wouldn't be able sell in the shop inside twelve months. I'll drip feed them onto eBay at the rate of one per fortnight, and I suspect I'll do ok with them.
When buying on eBay I set myself an absolute top price and under no circumstances will I exceed same. There are some fantastic bargains to be had providing you use common sense and avoid exceeding your upper price limit.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"simon" wrote
No company deserves defending when they make great big howlers, and unfortunately of late Hornby have made more than their fair share. It's sad really because they have a fantastic brand name which is generally well respected, and in the eyes of many they can do no wrong.
What Hornby are extremely good at is marketing, and if their products delivered what they seem to promise they would be unbeatable.
John.
Reply to
John Turner

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