Intersecting Slot Car Plus Train Set Equals Geek Toy

" If you=92ve always dreamed of having your train set crossover with
your slot car set, then dream no more. Hammacher Schlemmer has the
perfect (and expensive) toy for you. "
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Reply to
Dragon Heart
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Funny, my Minic Motorways set had that feature *in the mid-1960s*.
I had the RM928 double track crossing, as at the bottom of this page:
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Reply to
Bruce
Faller to an HO truck guided by a wire just below the surface. It's a bit toy-like but people have used the mechanism in more detailed models - there was an article showing somebody doing this with an O-scale Morris Minor.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
Was thinking exactly the same thing myself .Most of my trains were Tri-ang but I had a Wrenn Duchess. As this was a originally a Dublo tooled diecast metal Loco made it was heavy, The inevitable collision between the Greenline Routemaster meant that from that point it became a single decker.
G.Harman
Reply to
damduck-egg
Bruce wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Yup, my first trainset as a boy was bought for me by my parents from a family friend, came with loads of Mimic stuff, the level crossing you mention, a car loading ramp - which took a car directly on to a specially adapted wagon, all sorts ... and great fun.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
I have a feeling that the core market for model railways in 2010 is based around the very same people who played with Tri-ang and Hornby Dublo models in the 1950s and 60s. ;-)
My interest in railways, 1:1 and model, was based on my grandfather's interest. I don't think that the interest is handed down between generations in the same way today. Most kids are not remotely interested in trains.
Reply to
Bruce
Something tells me that you're probably in the same age group that we're discussing, though. ;-)
It's something I find quite depressing about model railway shows. There is a over-preponderance of older people, and the number of younger people coming in to the hobby doesn't appear to be enough to sustain it.
Obviously there are some young people, though. They must have been tempted in to the hobby by Thomas the Tank Engine. ;-)
Reply to
none
Your post prompted me to wonder if they ever sold a combined set and a search of one the Minic sites shows they did.
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Interesting as to what they called it and I think the 3rd picture down on that page makes no disguise of the intention.
Don't know if the present day US one that started the thread deliberatly shows a near miss rather than a crunch in case such thing are too sensitive now with Operation lifesaver etc.
I think my parents must have hidden the Minic catlougue from me, It's only in later years that i found out some of the rarer things like the car ferry .
G.harman
Reply to
damduck-egg
The Minic cars weren't really up to having collisions with trains. My Minic Jaguar S-Type Police car collided with a Tri-ang "Blue Pullman" train and was never quite the same again.
The Minic track had guide slots that harboured all kinds of detritus and were difficult to keep clean. The electrical contact with the car was via the edge of a thin phosphor-bronze strip that was also difficult to keep clean. Poor running was the order of the day, but it was fun when it worked!
Reply to
none
Not by a decade or more, I reckon.
Why is that a problem? Today they are playing Warhammer, building their modelling and painting skills on trolls, orcs and the like. One day they may well move onto railway modelling.
I think it's the ones who are into Warhammer and Airfix kits that will later make model railways, not those who are into train sets. But I could be wrong. Guy
Reply to
Just zis Guy, you know?
My 5 yo grandson has always been fascinated with anything that runs on wheels, including trains. He observed that he and I are interested in the same thing.
And I see lots of kids of both genders at local model rail shows.
Reply to
MartinS
SNIP
Same with my 10 year old son, he goes through phases of playing with our trains, plus whenever he brings friends back they almost always want a go. Dont forget youngsters dont need to be fanatical about it now to ensure they will be modellers in later life, I only had a modest interest as a child allowed to put loop down on carpet every so often and no interest in real trains even though steam was still around.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Nothing wrong with it at all. But my point is, they haven't been encouraged into the hobby by their relatives or peers, they have been tempted in by something they saw on television.
The days of large numbers of young trainspotters on railway station platforms have long gone. Those few that remain are often those who were trainspotters as kids in the 1960s and 70s - you only have to see them at Doncaster to realise that. Kids just aren't interested in railways to anything like the extent the kids of those days were.
That means there are probably fewer young people coming into this hobby of ours than for two generations.
Reply to
Bruce
[...]
Well, of course not. They're just segmented worms, in often eye-straining colours, that move along with no obvious means of propulsion. A steam engine displays its works right where you can see them. You can't help but look. ;-)
True, and they want ready to run, not kits.
wolf k.
Reply to
Wolf K
I agree with most of what you say, but I don't think all is lost, or that the hobby will disappear like the Oozelum bird in a puff of blue smoke.
Reply to
MartinS
of course I don't ;-) Seems most people are thinking that everyone comes in after a spell of trainspotting or at least an interest in real trains in their youth and that they will be interested only in what they saw in their younger days. However nowadays theres the preserved railways with the emphasis on pleasure travel and an excellent variety of trains. Its quite possible there are more youngsters interested in trains from these railways than there was in the olden days.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
I agree, all isn't lost, but model railways will become even more of a niche market than now.
Reply to
Bruce
"Trainspotting" seems to be a peculiarly UK thing! Here in New Zealand we never had ABC books of numbers and I only ever meet one boy who noted down engine numbers - he was a new immigrant from the UK. At my local station (circa 1961) there was only one train in the hour after school - it went south, shunted the local freezing works and returned half an hour later. I used to meet it at the level crossing quite regularly after school and always waved to the driver - one day he waved me into the cab (Ab Pacific) and I did the round trip to the works and back.
Just to stay on topic - we have a fair number of railway modellers here in NZ!
Greg.P. NZ
Reply to
Greg Procter

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