Q: Garrats and Sentinels in South America

Hello,
being a native German (model)railway - enthusiast nowadays living in
Paraguay, I´m looking for some information.
Our left over TOC FEPASA writes in the history of Paraguayan Railway:
"En 1953, después de los Sentinel, la otra inversión en equipos de tracción
que hizo el FCCP, fue la compra de un par de maquinas tipo Garrat 2-6-0, de
vapor saturado, hechas por la ?Yorkshire Engine? adquiridas de la
Argentina."
Can anyone help me find some useful information about the Sentinelrailcars
and the 2 Garratts?
Neither in the archives nor at the cemetery of locos "La Triangula" nearby
Sapucai I could find any hints.
Google told me about Garratts in Africa and New Zealand, Sentinels in South
Africa but nothing about South America.
I learned, that the 6 Sentinels were rebuilt to wagons and run a few years
as normal passenger wagons here, but where and when did the Sentinels come
from?
If you think another newsgroup fixes my request better, please tell me.
Regards and thanks from PY, every hint is welcome

Edgar
Reply to
Edgar Warnecke
Loading thread data ...
I looked in my copy of "Garratt Locomotives of the World", by A E Durrant, and what he says is, roughly:
The Argentine railways FC Entre Rios and FC North Eastern Argentina had a number of Garratts, both 2-6-0+0-6-2 and 4-4-2+2-4-4 types. They were in the habit of lending them to Paraguay when there were shortages of power. One of the 4-4-2+2-4-4 types was reported derelict in Paraguay in 1977.
They seem to have shared a boiler type, though AED lists it as superheated rather than saturated, and they were built by Beyer Peacock rather than Yorkshire Engine.
Hope this helps...
Tim
Reply to
Tim Illingworth
Edgar,
I did a bit of checking up on the Garratts on the book I have here - "Garratt Locomotives of the World" by A,E,Durrant. Apparently no Garratt locomotives were supplied to Paraguay, but several standard gauge 2-6-0+0-6-2 and 4-4-2+2-4-4 Garratts were supplied to FCER and FCNEA of Argentina and these locos were occasionally loaned to the Paraguayan Railways. The author also remarks that one of the Argentinean Atlantic Garratts was reported to be rotting away in the Paraguayan railway workshops in 1977
Here's a picture of the 2-6-0+0-6-2 loco
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Here's a picture of the 4-4-2+2-4-4 loco
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Probably the best web site for Garratts is this site
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from where the pictures came.
There were a lot of Garratts in South America - and Paraguay seems to be the exception in not having any locos supplied to the country directly.
A lot of Garratts were produced by other manufacturers - usually under licence from Beyer-Peacock, but the locos you are interested in were produced in Manchester by Beyer Peacock and there is an archive of B-P drawing held at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester
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and you can contact them through their contact page at
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Sorry, I'm not all that informed about Sentinel locomotives.
Jim.
Reply to
Jim Guthrie
[...]
You may get an answer here, there are a lot of strange obsessions amongst the denizens of this group. ;-)
OTOH, you could try uk.railway. Very active by the look of it. Set your news client to download only the most recent 50 headers or so, otherwise you'll be overwhelmed.
HTH
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
The only Sentinels I know of in South America were steam motor locomotives in Argentina and Colombia:
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However Skoda in Czechoslovakia built Sentinels including railcars under licence. I don't know much about them but....
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Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
Edgar,
This poist got lost in my news server and it duplicates some of what Tim has said but I've just sent the lot again :-)
I did a bit of checking up on the Garratts on the book I have here - "Garratt Locomotives of the World" by A,E,Durrant. Apparently no Garratt locomotives were supplied to Paraguay, but several standard gauge 2-6-0+0-6-2 and 4-4-2+2-4-4 Garratts were supplied to FCER and FCNEA of Argentina and these locos were occasionally loaned to the Paraguayan Railways. The author also remarks that one of the Argentinean Atlantic Garratts was reported to be rotting away in the Paraguayan railway workshops in 1977
Here's a picture of the 2-6-0+0-6-2 loco
formatting link
Here's a picture of the 4-4-2+2-4-4 loco
formatting link
Probably the best web site for Garratts is this site
formatting link
from where the pictures came.
There were a lot of Garratts in South America - and Paraguay seems to be the exception in not having any locos supplied to the country directly.
A lot of Garratts were produced by other manufacturers - usually under licence from Beyer-Peacock, but the locos you are interested in were produced in Manchester by Beyer Peacock and there is an archive of B-P drawing held at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester
formatting link
and you can contact them through their contact page at
formatting link
Sorry, I'm not all that informed about Sentinel locomotives.
Jim.
Reply to
Jim Guthrie
Christopher,
I wonder if the Sentinels could also have been loaned to the Paraguayan railways in the same way as the Garratts were, although I note that the Sentinels were metre gauge and I'm not sure if there were metre gauge tracks in Paraguay.
Jim.
Reply to
Jim Guthrie
I don't know.
To be honest I wasn't too interested in Sentinels in my train spotting days. I did occasionally see them but they weren't "real steam locomotives". L&Y pugs, Manning Wardles etc were even though they were tiny.
It was only when I got up close and personal with one on the Middleton Railway in Leeds that I realised how unorthodox and ingenious they were, with their high pressure water tube boiler, steam motor and chain drive. They were fast steam raisers, very efficient and ideal for light industrial shunting work. More economical than traditional engines.
Also a lot more successful than most attempts to get away from the Stephenson paradigm.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee

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