The tiniest train set in the world

East Anglian Daily Times
11th April 2009
Russel Claydon
" It may be small, but for model train enthusiasts it doesn't get
much more perfectly formed than this.
The tiniest train set in the world - with a 3mm track gauge - has gone
on sale in Suffolk.
And it is already building up steam at the Perfect Miniatures store in
Sudbury, with the =93T-Gauge=94 sets so small they can even be used inside
its dolls houses. "
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Reply to
Dragon Heart
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Just look up T Gauge on Google or YouTube. Lots of people are already into it.
Reply to
MartinS
East Anglian Daily Times
11th April 2009
Russel Claydon
" It may be small, but for model train enthusiasts it doesn't get much more perfectly formed than this.
The tiniest train set in the world - with a 3mm track gauge - has gone on sale in Suffolk.
-----ooooo-----
Just seen one of these on demo in the Gas Cupboard modellers shop in Westbury, Wilts.
Thought it was Z gauge, only to be corrected by the shopkeeper.
Reply to
Alun
What, the whole shop fits in a cupboard? That's amazing!
(kim)
Reply to
kim
You can get a big T-gauge layout in a cupboard.
Reply to
MartinS
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(Usual disclaimer applies)
Reply to
Alun
A little late from the EADT there, I think. Galaxy Models in Ipswich has had T gauge on sale for a while now, and last time I looked that was in Suffolk too.
Dave
Reply to
dave.rogers
I understand the motors are from a pager ?
Chris
Reply to
chris.brett58
I understand that the powered cars have adopted the old Triang 'Magnehesion' principle to give them sufficent traction power. This means that if one wishes one could lay track on the ceiling and run the powered cars upside-down! One might strike problems with flies on the track! More sensibly, at a recent model Rly. exhibition here in Melbourne, one of the T gauge distributors had set up a length of track at an agle of about 45 deg. to the horizontal, and had converted one of the power cars to an angled car as used on funicular railways and was running this car up and down this steep angle. Regards, Bill Pearce.
Reply to
Bill Pearce
I've started to wonder about a mobius strip railway.....
First sensible use of the stuff seen yet. Well done that chap !
- Nigel
Reply to
Nigel Cliffe
In 1950 A.J. Deutsch wrote a science fiction short story "A Subway named Mobius" (or Moebius) set on the Boston subway, on which the addition of a new line created a topological singularity causing a train to disappear.
A film version set on the Buenos Aries subway was made in Argentina in 1996.
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Reply to
MartinS

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