Re: Myths & Rumors??

I have seen some invitations to join a class action suit. Another ambulance
chaser figuring he can get his percentage if he gets enough clients. This
is an American tradition that we up here are slowly following unfortunately.
I can think of dozens of hazards, like electromagnetic fields for a
starter. No wonder I am so cynical in my old age. I should have lined my
beany with foil.
Randy
Something about Esab or Lincoln wires...I think NR-232 wire??? The story was
about a survey from an attorney looking to create a class action lawsuit
over the fume hazards of these wires??
Any one out there heard of it?
respectfully,
Harp
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
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It isn't just Esab and Lincoln wires. There's a scum sucking bottom feeder lawyer out there soliciting for class action lawsuits against all the welding electrode manufacturers.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
This URL tells alittle more about the suit
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Greg
Reply to
Greg Postma
One time around 1990, there was a notice from Lincoln that their 6011 rods contained arsenic. They did further analysis, and said the arsenic was "within acceptable levels."
I welded with these rods a lot and there's nothing wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me wrong with me ................................................
Steve
Reply to
Desert Traveler
Tape a quarter on that needle arm. It keeps the skipping to a minimum.;)
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
I use the cheaper solution. A quick slap to the side of the head usually works.
Arsenic within acceptable levels? Is that like barely pregnant, or low levels of radiation?
Steve
Reply to
Desert Traveler
Do a search on "hormesis".
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
The lawsuits in my opinion are a joke however there may be cases in which individuals were given inadequate information about the health risks associated with welding fumes.
The health risks are real. There may be some that say that is nonsense but the data conained on an MSDS indicates that precautions should be used. Below is a list from an MSDS of the effects of various components in welding fumes.
WELDING FUMES - Excess levels may cause bronchial asthma, lung fibrosis, pneumoconiosis or "siderosis." IRON, IRON OXIDE FUMES - Can cause siderosis (deposits of iron in lungs) which some researchers believe may affect pulmonary function. Lungs will clear in time when exposure to iron and its compounds ceases. Iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) are not regarded as fibrogenic materials. MANGANESE - Long-term overexposure to manganese compounds may affect the central nervous system. Symptoms may be similar to Parkinson's Disease and can include slowness, changes in handwriting, gait impairment, muscle spasms and cramps and less commonly, tremor and behavioral changes. Employees who are overexposed to manganese compounds should be seen by a physician for early detection of neurologic problems. TITANIUM DIOXIDE - Pulmonary irritation and slight fibrosis. SILICA (AMORPHOUS) - Research indicates that silica is present in welding fume in the amorphous form. Long term overexposure may cause pneumoconiosis. Noncrystalline forms of silica (amorphous silica) are considered to have little fibrotic potential. FLUORIDES - Serious bone erosion (Osteoporosis) and mottling of teeth. MOLYBDENUM - Prolonged overexposure may result in loss of appetite, weight loss, loss of muscle coordination, difficulty in breathing and anemia. CALCIUM OXIDE - Prolonged overexposure may cause ulceration of the skin and perforation of the nasal septum, dermatitis and pneumonia. ALUMINUM OXIDE - Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. MAGNESIUM, MAGNESIUM OXIDE - No adverse long term health effects have been reported in the literature. BARIUM - Long term overexposure to soluble barium compounds may cause nervous disorders and may have deleterious effects on the heart, circulatory system and musculature. NICKEL, NICKEL COMPOUNDS - Lung fibrosis or pneumoconiosis. Studies of nickel refinery workers indicated a higher incidence of lung and nasal cancers. CHROMIUM - Ulceration and perforation of nasal septum. Respiratory irritation may occur with symptoms resembling asthma. Studies have shown that chromate production workers exposed to hexavalent chromium compounds have an excess of lung cancers. Chromium (VI) compounds are more readily absorbed through the skin than chromium (III) compounds. Good practice requires the reduction of employee exposure to chromium (III) and (VI) compounds. COPPER - Copper poisoning has been reported in the literature from exposure to high levels of copper. Liver damage can occur due to copper accumulating in the liver characterized by cell destruction and cirrhosis. High levels of copper may cause anemia and jaundice. High levels of copper may cause central nervous system damage characterized by nerve fiber separation and cerebral degeneration. STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS - Strontium at high doses is known to concentrate in bone. Major signs of chronic toxicity, which involve the skeleton, have been labeled as "strontium rickets". LITHIUM COMPOUNDS - May be considered as potentially teratogenic.
The self shielded flux core wires such as mentioned in the post contain barium and lithium compounds.
A complete MSDS for hobart wires can be viewed at
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Hope this helps
G Austin
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Reply to
Gerald Austin

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