Receiver Question

Okay Doug, you caught me. Part of my confusion was that I didn't get the receiver that I ordered with it. I had ordered a R148DF but they
shipped a R149DP I guess that I'm not complaining but didn't know if that difference changed the equation any. I guess that I shouldn't expect that to have changed recommendations from the previous thread.
Hanging a 9 channel receiver, and 2000MAH LiPo battery pack...it's awefully crowded on my slow stick.
Even building something simple like the slow stick is quite a learning process. I just need to hang the battery, receiver, and ESC and then I'm ready to tackle the radio and setup.
Carl
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| Okay Doug, you caught me. Part of my confusion was that I didn't get | the receiver that I ordered with it. I had ordered a R148DF but they | shipped a R149DP I guess that I'm not complaining but didn't know if | that difference changed the equation any.
Ahh, I missed that change. It adds about 0.1 to 0.2 ounces to the equation, but doesn't really change the final result.
The R149DP is a better receiver (PCM even) but it's overkill. It'll work though ...
| I guess that I shouldn't expect that to have changed recommendations | from the previous thread.
Not really.
Still, the best answer I think you've gotten is to just get a 72 mHz module (either fixed frequency or synthesized) and a cheap 72 mHz receiver. Save the 50 mHz stuff for your next, larger plane.
| Hanging a 9 channel receiver, and 2000MAH LiPo battery pack...it's | awefully crowded on my slow stick.
Even a small micro receiver won't help *that* much. The main benefit is the reduced weight.
| Even building something simple like the slow stick is quite a learning | process. I just need to hang the battery, receiver, and ESC and then | I'm ready to tackle the radio and setup.
That's the easy part! :)
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com I plan on living forever. So far, so good.

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As to compatibility of JR and Futaba on 6 meters...they are NOT compatible. Different shifts. I know, because I have a JR on 00 and a Futaba on 00 and they will not cross over. I used to fly on 53.4 and did so for years. Got hit so bad that I had to abandon that frequency and go down to 00. Checked with monitors and Spectrum analyzers and there was nothing on 53.400...but still, every time I went up my plane went crazy. It was not the plane as I had a number of radios on 53.4...mostly JR and a few old AM Ace Silver Seven units and all got hit. I have no explanation..we are in a fairly remote area. There is an aircraft beacon nearby on 75 mhz exactly...and I find a weak signal on 52 mhz...still no reason for having to abandon the 53.4 channel. JR was very nice and converted my stuff from 53.4 to 50.800 (channel 0)..all this is a mystery to me...I have been flying R/C since the early fifties (yes, I am a senior citizen!) and never had problems on 6 meters before now.... any thoughts..if so, kindly email direct at snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net.... Thanks Frank Schwartz W4KFK in Hendersonville, TN
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Frank Schwartz wrote: ...)..all this is a mystery to me...I have been flying R/C since the

Frank - if you find out the source please post to the list! Tnx es 73 - LeeH, NB7F
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| As to compatibility of JR and Futaba on 6 meters...they are NOT | compatible. Different shifts. I know, because I have a JR on 00 and a | Futaba on 00 and they will not cross over.
I don't think anybody in this thread has said that they're compatible. But maybe I missed a post ...
(Or maybe you're thinking since I mentioned JR in the post that you're following to, that I was saying they were compatible? I was not saying that, though I do believe it to be true ...)
However, FMA seems to think they they should be --
From https://www.fmadirect.com/site/detail.htm?item 39&section=1 -- SPECIAL NOTE CONCERNING HAM BAND TRANSMITTERS: All current transmitters use positive shift modulation. When you order for current transmitters, your invoice will list the purchased item as 805FM50FJ or 805FM53FJ. This receiver will work with all recently manufactured transmitters. If you have an ACE transmitter or an old Futaba (prior to around 1990), you will require an ACE version. Your invoice will list the 805FM50ACE or 805FM53ACE. Please be advised, it is unclear when Futaba changed from negative to positive shift modulation. Unfortunately, unless you have access to test equipment, you may not know if your old Futaba requires negative or positive shift.
perhaps the 50 mHz Futaba equipment you tried was 15+ years old, or one was FM and the other AM, or one was PCM? As far as I know, what FMA is saying here is correct, though I don't have any JR ham band receivers to check out.
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
"The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the
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The 9 channel rx comes standard with the 9C. Mine is in a drawer at the moment waiting for something that will actually use that many channels such as another Ultra Stick 60 so I feel for ya about using it on the Slow Stick. Honestly, I would check out a plug in module for 72mhz to use with a micro 72mhz rx for the Slow Stick. My Slow Stick has one of those GWS teenytiny rx's on it.
--
Dan
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I think FMA sells a 5 channel mini rx on 50mhz but it costs the same as the 8 channel mini so seems kind of pointless to me. There really isnt that much of a size diff between the 2 and either would work fine on your Slow Stick. You can also buy one of those tx modules for your 9C on a 72mhz channel to use on your Slow Stick and similar park fliers. I have one on 38 for my Slow Stick, Kadet Senior (had an interference problem with the onboard video system and the 50mhz rx for some reason), and my slope flier. Other than the Berg 6 in my Magic 3D, everything else uses a Futaba rx either 7, 8, or 9 channel.
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Dan
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Okay. I am ready to fly!! Or crash as the case may be. I have my radio programmed and ready to go. Learned a few things and nearly lost plane in programming phase.
(1) Just because your friends ESC has a safety feature that requires your throttle to be advanced to 100% for 2 seconds and then to 0% to arm the throttle...doesn't mean yours will. I was trying to do this and found this not to be the case (At the same time I learned #2.)
(2) Check to make sure your throttle is responding in the proper direction while holding on to your aircraft. Picture the following;
Trying to arm throttle push up to 100% wait, back to 0%. Hmm didn't hear the beeps I was expecting. Puzzled look. Push throttle up again and start to pull back. motor starts unexpectedly..didn't expect it to actually move by now. Panic. Pull throttle down to 0%. Shoot! It's reversed! Plane darts across table knocks over some things. Propeller nut, washers, and prop spin off shaft and go flying. Whew, finally get throttle OFF and grab plane. Prop hex key is stripped out. Nobody died.
Okay everything is working. It is programmed and responds correctly. Turn off receiver. Motor starts and plane darts into glue bottle, box, etc. &^%*&^%*&^%*&^%R(&^%&^$#%!
Turn off Receiver BEFORE turning off Transmitter.
Still having fun. Carl
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| (2) Check to make sure your throttle is responding in the proper | direction while holding on to your aircraft. Picture the following; | | Trying to arm throttle push up to 100% wait, back to 0%. Hmm didn't | hear the beeps I was expecting. Puzzled look. Push throttle up again | and start to pull back. motor starts unexpectedly..didn't expect it | to actually move by now. Panic. Pull throttle down to 0%. Shoot! | It's reversed!
Yup, we've all been there. Some of us more than once :)
A good rule of thumb is to not put the prop on the plane at all until everything else is done. That way, when you screw up and accidently send it to full throttle while testing things out, nothing happens.
It's really tempting to put the prop on early -- it looks good, you don't lose it, etc. But it's something that has bitten (literally) many people ...
For some reason many ESCs seem to be reversed. I realize that the directions are pretty much arbitrary, but still, it seems like it would make sense to make them fit the standard receivers. But yet most seem reversed ...
Is the default throttle stick direction different on different brands of transmitters?
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com Beam me up, Scotty! It ate my phaser!

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Doug McLaren wrote:

No, its futaba transmitters that are recvresed.

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Carl / KG6YKL wrote:

scary isnt it. Like he said , dont put the prop on it and if it is a brushed motor , put two LED's on the motor leads (one green and one red reversed from each other) and see what light comes on. Red if reversed and green if ok. Or you could use light bulbs with steering diodes. Assume you have a current limiting resistor in place first. I am a tinkerer.
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jim breeyear wrote:

Care to sketch this up for me as well as specify the LEDs. I'd like to do this, sounds fun.
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Carl / KG6YKL wrote:

Carl, Send me your email address and I will. I couldnt find it on QRZ.COM 73 Jim W1HRM
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Carl / KG6YKL wrote:

Put a 1k resistor in series with two parallel LEDs facing in opposite directions. The longer LED leads are the 'anodes', so if a particular LED is lit, that means the longer lead is at least 1.5V more positive than the negative lead, at least for standard red or green LEDs. The 1k resistor will limit current to about 5mA.
Parts at Radio shack, or your local equivalent.
Alternately, just go buy a multimeter, which can often be had for under $10.
--
Regards,
Bob Monsen
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Bob Monsen wrote:

I have a fluke multimeter, but I'd like to play with LEDs. Carl
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| scary isnt it. Like he said , dont put the prop on it and if it is a | brushed motor , put two LED's on the motor leads (one green and one red | reversed from each other) and see what light comes on. Red if reversed | and green if ok. Or you could use light bulbs with steering diodes. | Assume you have a current limiting resistor in place first.
Of course, you don't need to jump through any of these hoops.
If you're worried if it's running the right direction or not, brushed or not, just rest the prop on it (don't put the nut on -- just the prop) and point the plane up and give it a little power, and see if the prop goes the right way or not. Or just give it a little power with no prop on, and feel which way it's going with your fingers, and compare that to the way the prop goes.
| I am a tinkerer.
Then tinker. I tinker too, but usually only when there's not an easier way.
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Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
Her face was a perfect oval, like a circle that had its two other
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Yeah . . . when I'm fooling around with an electric, with the battery & motor hooked up and the prop on, I wear safety glasses. Things happen, you know? Once I was revving up a small brushless motor while holding the nose straight up to check the thrust/weight, when the motor pulled off its mount. Of course, the motor and the prop whipped around madly for maybe a quarter of a second before one of the wires pulled out of the motor, but that was enough time to chew up the front of the fuselage and take a nip off of my knuckle.
Even if you're not deliberately starting the motor, you could bump the Tx, or something could fall on the Tx, or you could have a metal-metal contact that drives the receiver crazy . . .
Like the other poster said, it's best to keep the prop *off* as long as you can. But when you really need to spin the prop . . . never forget that unlike glow engines, it's very easy to accidently start an electric motor.
--
"There are two types of people: those who can be sorted into one of two
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