anyone know any good books with lots of patterns for scroll work?

Ok Grant -
Here is some ideas and a book - I don't have it - but you can see!
http://www.shopoutfitters.com/Ornamentaldesignbook.html
My other books are in the other room - painting the shelves so they are in stacks on the floor. Nothing big, but might be something here and there in them.
Soon.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
Grant Erwin wrote:

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Also noticed a couple of booklets at Dover.com
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

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I can get the isbn numbers if needed - looked like 18xx various types. Some looked cast, but could be done in strip and rod.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

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Personally, I think most machine made scrolls look like crap. Especially when made out of dinky little flat bar bent the easy way, with flat ends where they fit into the scroll die.
That said, I also own a scrolling machine that cost more than a new toyota- well, a Yaris, anyway. But it has the power to scroll 8' long pieces of 1/2" round stainless into curlicues, and I build or modify my own dies as well. I am currently working on a fence that incorporates around 600 scrolls, all hot forged first, from 1/2" stainless, so the machine will pay for itself on the one job.
You wanna see the ultimate scrolling machines, look at the germans- http://www.heboe.com / http://www.usahebo.com/contact.htm http://www.glaser.de/seiten/start.htm
The average die for one of these machines weighs about what your entire set of machines weighs combined, and costs around a grand. For the die. You dont wanna know what the machines cost.
The reason for this expense is to try to approach the look and materials of a handmade scroll- most every good looking historical or contemporary ornamental iron using scrolls had every scroll made by hand. This makes for shapes and materials not possible with your little jig- things like half penny ends on every one. And the slight variation between each makes for a much more pleasing look.
So ultimately, I think if it were me, I would sell the scroll jig. To some screen door maker, or something.
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Ries wrote:

Hear that. Metalcraft scrolls don't have flats though. They certainly don't look forged, but some people don't care. I'm never going to do smithing for money so that part doesn't matter to me. But I do steel fabrication - railings, beam plates, stairways, fireplace surrounds etc. - so it's conceivable to me that if I could find something, some little wine rack or towel rack or log holder, something that I could sell, maybe I could conceivably make this pay. The guy who bought this stuff, the late brother of a friend, made his living doing street fairs & farmers markets selling scrollwork.

I appreciate that. I'm sure a lot of smiths would say that.
Grant
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Grant,
I would keep the scroll bender.
You can use straight off the shelf new steel -- 1 inch square tubing, some 1" by 1/8" strap, and make a mailbox post. Or bookshelf, or hall rack.
When your mother in law wants a doodad and doesn't know about or care about hand forging, take the simple, made-in-china look. Or if you want to sell some hat racks or picnic sets at a flea market. Or you want to make a pattern. Use the scroll bender and simple strap or rod. It is a shame to waste time making something for someone that really wants a shelf that looks like the one in the store.
Do your forging for people that want the forging. But keep the stuff around to make the less informed customer happy, too.
You might even find yourself combining the two aspects of the art for interior pieces, or fences, columns, and gates. Broaden your approach -- and be able to hit a happy medium between a wholly forged bid, and a mass production bid.
My two cents.
Brad K. Ponca City, OK
Grant Erwin wrote:

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