OT Survey: Age & Years of Machining Experience



Agreed. The thing that has made this country what it is...innovation..is the key to combating the temporary effects of low wages in other countries. Everyone is whining about China, much like they used to whine about Japan. The only real advantages China has right now are low labor rates and a complete disregard for the environment. Both of which will be temporary in the big picture. They don't have reliable power and they have a very unskilled workforce. The skills of the workforce will increase, but as that happens, the pay demands will go up. The infrastructure is still decades away from being resolved to a level comparable to more industrialized countries. With this infrastructure will come the cost burden, which will increase tax rates on companies and individuals.
Now, in the US, to combat the temporary effects, people and companies need to get off thier collective ass, quit whining and get back to some serious innovation. We can make products competitive to China in cost, but it takes investment and real effort to do so. I see way to many companies that refuse to re-invest in the business, or they do so at such a paltry level that it doesn't do any good. Reducing costs in the product requires investment of capital, time, and effort. For every success in a process improvement resulting in a real cost reduction, there were probably 50 things that failed to produce any real results. R&D on a constent basis is the key.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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BB,
I didn't see Cliff's response to this survey.
What was his input?
Has he ever setup or operated a CNC?
Tom
BottleBob wrote:

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brewertr wrote:

Tom:
    What, and give someone else some information that might later be used against him, like he would do? You've got to be kidding, he's too fearful and paranoid to do THAT. LMAO!     
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BottleBob
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BB,
Well we know Cliff has never Programmed, Setup or Operated a CNC Lathe.
I doubt Cliff has ever programmed, setup or operated any CNC.
I was just curious if Cliff had answered the OP questions and I missed it.
Tom
BottleBob wrote:

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brewertr wrote:

Tom:
    Well, I don't know if he's EVER programmed a lathe, but it's clear he'd have some trouble manually programming one NOW, without some training/practice.

    Other than BD's joke posting as Cliff, no Cliff didn't respond to the survey.
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BottleBob
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You're delusional.
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Dan

Scopulus est usquequaque nefas
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Let's take a Fanuc 31iT for example. That is where the book tells you to set the offset to. Then put the whole radius amount in the TNRC register. The control takes care of everything else.
You missed the part where I said different controls have different ways of dealing with these issues.
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Dan

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He didn't miss it...he ignored it.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Still no joy, eh?
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Dan

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BottleBob wrote:

I'm 53, and I've been at it for 35 years.
In case anybody's interested, I got into machining by sheer dumb good luck. I was poor and clueless when I was a kid. Family split up when I was 16. Worked my way through high school. Didn't have a pot to piss in, and all that. Started college with a scholarship; but was still poor at the end of the school day, so I dropped out (for a while) to see if I could maybe earn an actual living. I had no useful experience, unless you count washing dishes, cutting lawns, or pumping gas. And I had no education other than high school and a single year of college.
So I worked at whatever I could find, and watched the newspapers for jobs that might be worth doing. In Detroit, in 1971, there weren't a lot of jobs in the papers for anybody, let alone a clueless college dropout. But the most common listings I can remember were for Bridgeport operators. I had no clue what a Bridgeport was, or why anybody'd want to operate on one; but there always jobs available. And, occasionally, the ads would include the wages offered, which were WAY more than I was making.
I worked for a while at a Pontiac car dealership in Northwest Detroit. My job was driving the company pickup truck. I'd drive up Telegraph Road every morning to the GM parts warehouse in the city of Pontiac, to pick up all the parts that the dealership had ordered the day before. I'd take those back to the dealership and put them on the shelves or in the racks. Then I'd spend the rest of my day delivering bumpers and fenders and stuff to garages and body shops.
Telegraph Road, especially North of 8 Mile Road (yes, the same one as in the Eminem movie) is literally lined with small and medium size industrial buildings. I didn't know anything about what went on inside them; but I drove right past a hundred of those buildings every single day. One day, on my way to Pontiac, I saw this little sign in front of one of the nicer and cleaner buildings. It said "Help Wanted. Bridgeport Operator Trainee."
Now, I still had no idea what a Bridgeport was, but I knew that operating one was the ticket to all those jobs I'd seen in the paper. And here was someone who wanted to train me! I almost killed myself, and a half dozen other people, as I swerved the pickup truck across three lanes of traffic to get into that company's driveway and apply for that job.
I'd taken some shop classes in high school, just for fun. I had a little box full of hand tools that I (sorta) knew how to use, as a natural part of driving $100 cars, which were all I could afford, and which needed repairs almost daily. I'd taken all the math and science classes my high school offered, and had done math and physics courses during my year in college. I even knew how to read a micrometer and a vernier, since physics lab work involved a variety of measurement activities. So, the foreman of this little shop hired me. It was one of the best days of my life.
There was another day, four years later, when I decided to STAY in the machining business. But that's another story.
To finish this story: I showed up for my first day in that little shop, and was immediately put to work on a Bridgeport. Someone else had set up the machine with a cutter and a little fixture. All I had to do was load the parts into the fixture, close a DeStaCo clamp, and turn the handle till I got to the red grease pencil line that had been made on the dial. Then I'd unload the parts and check them with a micrometer. But it was a Bridgeport! And I was operating it! And, in my very first hour on that very first job, I fell in love with the whole idea of cutting metal.
And I've been doing it, and loving it, ever since.
KG
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BottleBob wrote:

21 with 17 years experience at it :)

22 Years.
Started working with my Brother-in-law in an automotive machine shop. Did everything there from sweeping the floor to running the crankshaft grinder. Saw some interesting stuff. Rebuilt everything from single cyl Briggs motors to Rolls Royce V8s, to Cat diesels.
Been at my current job since April 7th 1997. Started as a machinist, but currently just drawin' up purdy' 3D pictures of molds all day :)
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BottleBob wrote:

Had to give up a machine shop in 2001 after 25 years due to a Divorce.
Am now looking for a plant management job any where in the US.
Can sent a cover letter if anybody is interested
Bill Sherlock Sr. Dunedin,Fl
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On 5 Aug 2006 13:57:34 -0700, "Mr.Henderson"

<snip>
======================Thank you for your kind words.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) had it right when observed in The Devil's Dictionary "History. An account, mostly false, of events, mostly unimportant, which are brought about by rulers, mostly knaves, and soldiers, mostly fools."
The attitude toward history of every "suit" I have had contact with in industry, government or academia was the same as Henry Ford's (1863-1947) who stated "History is more or less bunk. It's tradition. We don't want tradition. We want to live in the present and the only history that is worth a tinker's damn is the history we make today." When pressed with the facts, their out was always "Yes -- yes, BUT THINGS ARE DIFFERENT THIS TIME...."
I have considered writing, but a review of the literature [always a good place to start] indicates there are many, many books already in print on the same topics I would cover at the highest levels. I suggest the following:
This is an older work, but has stood the test of time well. The End of the Nation-State by Jean-Marie Guehenno (Amazon.com product link shortened)(3155 for a somewhat critical review of the above see http://www.leaderu.com/ftissues/ft9608/bacevich.html
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (Hardcover) by Jared Diamond (Amazon.com product link shortened)54829221/ref=sr_1_20/103-3793123-6867065?ie=UTF8&s=books
Among Empires: American Ascendancy and Its Predecessors by Charles S. Maier (Amazon.com product link shortened)54829444/ref=sr_1_56/103-3793123-6867065?ie=UTF8&s=books
The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic [The American Empire Project] by Chalmers Johnson (Amazon.com product link shortened)54829444/ref=sr_1_58/103-3793123-6867065?ie=UTF8&s=books
When executives and directors subscribe to the "buy, ruin, sell" theory of management pioneered by Gulf+Western, they can and will ruin any and everything faster than you and entire platoons of engineers and technicians can hope to repair it, even working 24/7.
My advise for to days' workers is trust no one, get the money up front, and be ready to get another job on an hour's notice. Agreements made with a company, even those in writing and signed by a corporate officer, mean nothing as these are routinely abrogated as the first order of business in the chapter 11/7 bankruptcy process.
Keep your retirement funds and savings in insured savings accounts. The stock market is a mob run casino with rigged wheels and marked cards. Even the underlying corporations cannot be trusted with your money. Try to have at least some of your funds in non-dollar accounts and gold.
When you must chose between doing something for your employer and doing something for your self or for/with your family, always chose your self or family.
Don't buy anything if you don't need it [as opposed to just wanting it.]
Unka George (George McDuffee)
...and at the end of the fight is a tombstone white with the name of the late deceased, and the epitaph drear: A Fool lies here, who tried to hustle the East.
Rudyard Kipling The Naulahka, ch. 5, heading (1892).
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