connecting batteries in parallel or series, myth and theory

snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:


Why is anyone bothering to talk to you?
And I'll point out that the above is just the worst example, not the only one.
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On Aug 15, 1:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@apaflo.com (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:

Gee Floyd, looks like you have been taking lessons from Tweedledum. I never said;

Which either makes you a simpleton or a liar.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You did say "A diode is not a rectifier", which is hilarious.

If you think there is something wrong with the statement above, and given your response it appears that you do, then you might be some of these names you bandy about.
Parallel battery banks are not exactly uncommon... some of us have seen some fairly high capacity plants that use multiple parallel strings.
Regardless, you can rest assured that a diode is a rectifier by definition.
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On Aug 16, 1:26 am, snipped-for-privacy@apaflo.com (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:

As a definition I would have to agree. Perhaps you would show us the circuit where a single diode can change AC to DC.
While we wait for that revelation you can tell us whether you are a simpleton or a liar.

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Look up "half wave"
http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_6/chpt_5/3.html http://www.bapihvac.com/CatalogPDFs/I_App_Notes/Understanding_Full_and_Half_Wave.pdf
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Cool. Now apply that to a DC battery bank.

http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_6/chpt_5/3.htmlhttp://www.bapihvac.com/CatalogPDFs/I_App_Notes/Understanding_Full_an ...
Look up;
simpleton
liar
At a guess, simpleton, is the correct answer
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wrote:

A direct example http://homepage.ntlworld.com/wilf.james/nicads.htm
68000 hits on google for "half wave battery charger" That is a fundamental application, and one I have used many times. Direct connection with a wire. Many modern applications of an old circuit. You probably have used them if you ever used an old automotive charger.
All chemical cells are DC by definition. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rectifier More examples http://www.talkingelectronics.com/projects/BatteryCharger-12vSLA/BatteryCharger-12vSLA.html A 1999 patent http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5940280/description.html
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"Floyd L. Davidson" wrote:

Then that definition is as faulty as other definitions from your Telco oriented textbook answers.
In general, a diode is a rectifier, but here are other applications, like current steering. Yes, it prevents reverse current flow, but it is in a DC only application. Then there are 'Protection Diodes', that attempt to outsmart fools who shouldn't be anywhere near electronics. Diodes are used to drop a DC voltage, or provide a reference voltage, both DC only applications. Then we get to LEDs, which are not typically suitable for rectifiers. A Gunn diode turns DC into microwaves. Once again, these are DC only application, and no rectification takes place.
The whole world isn't bands of 2 V telco batteries and refrigerator sided 'Rectifiers' to float charge them.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

AFAIK, the term "diode" pre-dates semiconductors by some considerable period. The term was used to describe a valve (tube to our trans-pondean friends) with a cathode and an anode (two in total, hence a diode).
Particular diode designs were designed as "rectifier diodes". That terminology was continued when semiconductors came along, to give "signal diodes" and "rectifier diodes". Eventually, by common usage, the latter was shortened to "rectifier" and the former to "diode".
In general, a rectifier is a diode, not vice versa. Much like a human is a primate but a primate is not necessarily human. The word "rectifier" indicates that the design purpose of this particular diode is some form of power conversion - not some form of signal processing. Not all diodes are rectifiers by definition - because the definition of a rectifier is that of being a diode designed or used for a particular, limited, purpose - that of power conversion.
-- Sue
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@privacy.net says...

I'd say the opposite; A diode is a rectifier, but not verse-visa. An LED, for instance, may not be used primarily as a rectifier but it is one. OTOH, synchronous rectifiers are not made from diodes, rather "higher order" semiconductors (e.g. FETs or SCRs).
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

This is because you are defining all things that rectify as being rectifiers. That isn't how a rectifier was defined. A rectifier was an abbreviation of the term "rectifier diode". It was a particular type of diode. All diodes rectify but not all diodes are rectifiers.
Language evolves. Your definition may easily become the norm. May have already become the norm in certain specialisations. But a purist will always look to the derivation of the word, rather than current usage, when considering definitions.
-- Sue
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Palindrome wrote:

Did you mean "all things that rectify as being diodes" ?

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rectifier
Did you mean "All diodes rectify but not all rectifiers are diodes" ?
http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/diode http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diode
mike
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m II wrote:

Using general purpose dictionaries for electronics makes about as much sense, as going to Midas Muffler for heart bypass surgery.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

There's ANOTHER place?
mike
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@privacy.net says...

Ok, all diodes are rectifiers, so all diodes are "rectifier diodes". ;-)
A "rectifier" is something that rectifies.

It *IS* the norm (and your argument doesn't convince me it's ever been otherwise). ...at least has been since I've been around the biz. OTOH, both descriptive and definitive dictionaries both have their problems.
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Except that *is* exactly how it is defined.

If all diodes rectify, they are all rectifiers.

Why don't you look it up instead of using your imagination?
"From WordNet (r) 2.0 [wn]:
diode n 1: a thermionic tube having two electrodes; used as a rectifier [syn: rectifying tube, rectifying valve]"
There is your original derivation. The device is *only* a diode if it is used as a rectifier. Wordnet continued:
" 2: a semiconductor that consists of a p-n junction [syn: semiconductor diode, junction rectifier, crystal rectifier]"
Another: "From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03) [foldoc]:
diode
<hardware, electronics> A semiconductor device which conducts electric current run in one direction only. This is the simplest kind of semiconductor device, it has two terminals and a single PN junction. One diode can be used as a half-wave rectifier or four as a full-wave rectifier."
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That has little to do with telco terminology.

Not bad so far, but...

That simply is not true. In fact, "signal diodes" are often used as rectifiers.

Backwards. Any diode is by definition a rectifier. Not all rectifiers are necessarily diodes, though they clearly must emulate a diode to cause "rectification".

Note true at all, and not all rectification is "power conversion".

Dead on.
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Palindrome wrote:

Have you ever seen, or even heard of an electrolytic rectifier? It was one of the fist developed, to charge batteries from the AC line. The term Valve was the first low grade vacuum tube rectifier. Then we have the more exotic like thyratrons and Triacs when can adjust the trigger voltage, to almost any conduction phase. there were copper oxide rectifiers, mechanical rectifiers, like those used in a vibrator power supply.. Today, we have synchronous rectifiers, using power FETS, where the gates are driven for the proper half cycle. These are commonly used where the Vf wastes too much power, and the lower Ron of the FET reduces the wasted power, and waste heat.
Have you ever seen an Eimac 15R vacuum rectifier? It was developed for the early airborne RADAR used in W.W.II. It, along with the 15E triode generated the RF pulse for the transmitter section.
http://www.radiomuseum.org/tubes/tube_15r.html
there was an online data sheet for the 15E, but I can't find it right now. It looked like the 15R, but had a pin out the side to connect the grid.
The oldest electronics manuals I have all refer to rectifiers rather than diodes. Some are form the days of spark transmitters, but they are all on another computer that's not accessible on my home network,, right now.
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Other way around. A diode device is by definition a rectifier, but not all rectifiers are diodes.

Good to see that you woke up and are now contradiction yourself, Mike.
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"Floyd L. Davidson" wrote:

Lets see you build a usable power supply form constant current diodes, low voltage Zeners, or the WW-II vintage microwave mixer diode like the 1N21.

Only in your drug induuced dreams, Floyd.
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