Could someone explain the UK's system of electrical certification?

Hello,
I am a lift engineer in Poland.
Is there any website explaining (in simple way) the UK's system of
electrical certification? In other words: what should one do to be able to
work as an electrician (the scope would be putting into work (if these are
the correct words for this activity) and maintaining instalations but also
includes measurements).
I am pretty sure that Polish papers will not do :-)
TIA,
--
Tomasz S.
To write change "to_nie_ten_adres" -> "jakubwedrowycz"
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T.S.
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Tomasz,
You don't need any papers to call yourself an electrician in the UK.
Generally most companies require that you have a minimum of C&G236 pt.1 & pt.2
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sQuick..
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sQuick
"T.S." wrote
Serdecznie Witamy (?) Welcome (back) to Europe :-)
There is no requirement to have any qualifications to be an electrician in the UK. However, there is a requirement for someone who works on office, factory, etc installations to be 'competent' and this usually means holding recognised qualifications. If you are self-employed it may also be an advantage to be a member of a professional organisation such as NICEIC (National Inspection Council for Electrical Installation Contractors) or ECA (Electrical Contractors Association). You will also have to have appropriate Public Liability Insurance.
There is also a proposal to bring electrical work under the Building Regulations, which would mean that approved electrical contractors would be able to self-certify that their work meets the requirements of the Building Regulations. The alternative would be to pay a fee to have the work inspected by a local authority building control department, or other approved private sector building inspector. This is only a proposal at present, and applies to England and Wales but NOT to Scotland.
If you wished to join the NICEIC (which is NOT compulsory) and set up your own business as a jobbing electrical contractor, their requirements are:
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In summary: City & Guilds 2380/2381 (16th Edition) Certificate*- this covers designing installations to meet the wiring regulations City & Guilds 2391 (Inspection, Testing and Certification) Certificate - this is required to be able to sign off installations as tested.
They also require the following test equipment: The following equipment is the minimum required for testing: 1. Voltage Indicating Device 2. Earth Continuity Tester 3. Insulation Resistance Tester 4. Earth Fault Loop Impedance Tester 5. Residual Current Device Tester 6. Suitable Leads for live tests, for items 4 and 5 above An All-in-one Instrument combines the first 5 items, and costs around GBP 700, but competent electrical contractors should already have this equipment.
There have been several discussions in the uk.d-i-y (Do-It-Yourself) newsgroup with enthusiasts who have considered a career change (from IT or whatever) to becoming an electrician. You may find it useful to read through these threads - the google URL points to the first message in the thread. Click on "view complete thread".
I am interested in becoming an electrician and wanted to know what qualifications were needed. (from 2001, may have been some changes since then)
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What Qualifications needed for fitting other peoples domestic electrics in UK? [from 2003]
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Can I work as a freelance electrician?
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Testing wiring - who can issue certificates?
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Domestic electricity regulations for installation
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Examples of C&G 2381 test paper questions
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The UK.diy newsgroup has an informative FAQ about the British Electrical system
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You might also find useful the Non-US Electrical Systems and Trades Section at:
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|AMP|+Trades&number=9&DaysPrune=1000&LastLogin= To work as a basic electrical installation operative, possibly under the guidance of a supervising electrician, a copy of the IEE On-Site Guide might be useful:
The guide is a practical guide to the Wiring Regulations and is the adopted text for many college and training courses for electricians / electrical installation. "The IEE On-site Guide" enables the competent electrician to deal with small installations, such as domestic houses and small premises.
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The Wiring Regulations are published by the Institution of Electrical Engineers at
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they have a branch in Poland at
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The IEE would be the people to contact if you want to work at a Chartered Engineer (post-graduate qualification) level in the industry.
and an online discussion formum (General Professional and Technical) at
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Owain
Reply to
Owain
U¿ytkownik "Owain" napisa³ w wiadomo¶ci news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Your answers gave me information I could not find on my own and threw light on the issue. Thank you all for your time and effort (esp. "Owain" - this was impressive :-) ).
TS
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T.S.

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