Best high-security locks

"billb" wrote in message:
I really am a college student... Thank you for your concern on my study habits... I do well enough in school in spite of the amount of time, in your opinion seen as "excessive", I spend on the Internet... In fact, several of my courses each semester REQUIRE me, as part of my studies, to utilize the Internet in order to successfully achieve the required course objectives and receive a "good" grade...
For the fall semester, I received six A's and one A- while carrying, as usual for me, an "overloaded" class schedule... I think considering that I have an overall GPA of 3.75 with 75 credits earn so far, combined with the fact that I will soon be awarded not one but TWO Associate's Degrees in only TWO academic years when graduation rolls around this coming May that I have a good concept of the amount of "free time" I have available to be spending on the Internet...
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man, now a college student...
Reply to
Evan
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Sargent, Reasonably good quality construction. No drill resistance. Variety of keyways. Keso is much more dificult to copy keys (dimple keys)/. Keso is essentially pick proof.
Medeco, Good quality. Good drill resistance. Variety of keyways, some restricted key blanks. Essentially pick proof.
Schlage Everest Primus, Not worked with this.
Mul-T-Lock, Not familiar with this brand.
as well as some that seem not to be readily available in the US, like
EVVA, don't know much about this.
Abloy, keys can't be copied by most folks. Unsure about drill resistance. Essentially pick proof.
I'd just like to hear some opinions on the pros and cons of each of these locks, as well as any alternatives I may have missed. Also, if I wanted to do install something like an Abloy Protec deadbolt (for its claimed resistance to bumping) or something similar, how would I obtain these in the US?
Thanks,
-Stian
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Then you too can wear a baseball cap indoors and have a stupid smile. And tell people you're "certified" but no clue what certified means. Oh, forgot. they do it right through the course, so you don't need to know.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
naa, too may 'keys out'..never had an left open problem that they mentioned..
things were being borrowed and nobody knew by WHO.. they KNEW there was 175 keys to the outside doors..
till I rekeyed with Assa and gave them 60 keys..
and got about 150 SEMI obscene calls from people that were NOT supposed to ahve keys, complaining the kety they had no longer worked...LOLOL
but the 'loss rate went WAYYYY down, suddenly. --Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
Sounds like my congregation. As an assistant clerk, I've got a key to the building, and to the clerk's office. My exterior key is #153. Of course, the masters work (three or four per the two congregations). And the stake level guys have keys to the building, probably a dozen or more there. And the custodians all have masters, add another dozen maybe.
It's a constant battle to keep things locked during off hours. We even had someone to come by and check the building each night. Not sure if we still do that.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Well, have one keyed lock per section, but if you have 10 doors all next to each other, do you really need a cylinder on each one????
I think that is silly.
Reply to
billb
"billb" wrote in message:
What you think is silly is something that is actually providing another form of security... Tamper Resistance... By having a keyed cylinder on each of the ten doors in that "section" or entry area, the designer of that facility is making it MUCH MORE DIFFICULT for an outside entity to be able to take control of allowing access from the exterior at that door... It is much easier for a burglar to vandalize ONE lock at each entrance to a mall to disrupt security and police responses than it is to vandalize TEN locks at each entryway...
That form of vandalism that is well known to locksmiths is much more disruptive and therefore also much more effective if there are fewer exterior lock cylinders available for use... Remember the basic purpose of a lock is to keep out the casual thieves and the semi-pro crooks who don't want to risk detection by "smashing and grabbing" preferring to "strike" when they find a target that has been left unsecured... But also to allow those who should be allowed access at all times "authorized personnel" to be able to open them whenever they need to...
An old proverb is appropriate here:
"One man's junk [or in this case silliness] is another man's treasure [or in this case wisdom]... ~~ unknown
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man, now a college student...
Reply to
Evan
I think you are full of shit. If out of 10 doors, only one had a keyable entry, there is far less chance of somebody picking or impressioning it, than if there are more such doors.
Reply to
billb
this ended up 1 by the office, 1 into the kitchen, 300 feet away on opposite side of building, and a third over by a commonly used area.. --Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
"billb" wrote in message:
Did you actually READ what I wrote, or are you just content with being an ignorant retard ???
Have TEN doors with ONLY one cylinder available on the exterior and a VANDAL only has to superg;ue ONE cylinder... Have TEN doors with TEN cylinders and someone has to carry around a lot more glue to hijack the ability of authorized personnel to open the doors from the outside...
Reply to
Evan
"Keyman55" wrote in message:
INCORRECT...
"The Authority Having Jurisdiction" may require exterior access to large commercial structures... Egress points are specified as to location and width by the type of occupancy -- but the fire inspector/chief of department/fire marshall/etc may require that many of those egress doors be operable from the outside in order to be able to gain entry at various points around the building -- just like many of the exterior doorways are now required to be numbered on commercial structures so they are more easily identified...
But then again Keyman, I doubt you care -- you are from a different state which has different rules...
Evan, ~~ formerly a maintenance man, now a college student...
Reply to
Evan
For what it's worth: I've gotten very tired of people whose responses are nothing but insults, deserved or not, and have started killfiling so I don't have to read that sort of nonsense. It may mean I lose some useful comments, but y'know, I think that's still a net gain.
Reply to
Joe Kesselman
Can be picked by someone good.
Easy to bump, but most people won't have the blanks as they are fairly restricted. Can be picked if you are good enough.
The higher end locks are very nice and fairly low cost. Lots of weird things like magnets in the keys available.
With the anti-drill hardened cylinders, you would have a devil of a time drilling the lock out. Even without, they aren't easy. Most locksmiths can't copy these keys, and the blanks aren't available anyway. Insanely expensive. Probably the best cylinder available. Can't be bumped.
-N
> > I'd just like to hear some opinions on the pros and cons of each of these > locks, > as well as any alternatives I may have missed. Also, if I wanted to do > install > something like an Abloy Protec deadbolt (for its claimed resistance to > bumping) > or something similar, how would I obtain these in the US? > > > Thanks, > > -Stian > >
Reply to
nobody
Evan As stated by another poster you are full of it ! Please state the section and code from NFPA or ICC Fire Code that
pertains to ENTRANCES. specifically not egresses.
The AHJ is responsible to follow standards or make exceptions based on local requirements, , decisions by AHJ have be overturned by courts, for arbitrary decisions/ rules .
Reply to
Keyman55

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