Should I Hire a Locksmith?

I'm having a new house built and the builder has given me the option (to
save money) of not having any locks or door knobs installed.
All doors are pre-drilled.
He suggests I should hire a locksmith, but I have installed locksets with
kits from Loews before and honestly don't see any rocket science in it.
Advice please!!!
TIA
Tomas
Reply to
tomas wilson
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If all of the holes are already drilled, then you'll at least have to know how to use a screw driver.
Reply to
Bob
i've never heard of this...and it's not even odd...
yeah, you can get at least 20.00 bucks an hour for doing it it would be like working from your own home
Reply to
Levon
That sounds like a really strange comment from a builder.
In any case, I suggest getting the locksmith. They can help you decide what locks and other security devices you may want to use. BTW the locks from the big box stores are junk, even the expensive ones. They will not last nearly as long or provide the same level of security that a good lock set from a qualified locksmith.
Reply to
Joseph Meehan
There are locks, and there are locks. If you want top quality, good security, visit a locksmith. Get sound advice, not just a low price for a mediocre lockset from a big box store. That may be fine for interior doors, but you want better on the entrance doors. If you don't care that it will be tarnished in three years. go to Lowes.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
I've seen a lot of really awful work done by builders. So, if it were my house I'd call a couple locksmiths, and hire the one who sounds like he makes sense.
As another fellow said, the "big box" stores don't sell high quality locks.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
This sounds extremely odd. Once your locks are installed they loose all access to the property.
Better read you contract really carefully.
Do you get to paint as well?
Reply to
SQLit
"SQLit" snipped-for-privacy@qwest.net wrote in message
I know you say that with a bit of sarcasm, but I know of two people that had the builder not paint so they could to it themselves.
Reply to
Edwin Pawlowski
We moved into a home built in the 30's that already had mortise locks in all of the doors. Because of the convenience, we kept the existing lock and just leave the upper side button depressed so it's like passage even though there is still a cylinder on the outside, and installed a new Kwikset Access One (remote control / keypad) deadbolt lock with a bright-brass finish and lifetime finish warranty on the back door that we use all the time.
We used a satin chrome Schlage "commercial" grade keyed lever lockset on a detached garage due to the ease of use (lever). All of these were purchased at Home Depot.
What would you suggest as far as a better brand?
Reply to
bwells
If you can read directions, and work a screw driver, then yes, I would install them yourself and yes you would save a good bit of money. But just a little advice before you do:
1. Don't buy the cheapest 2. Save all of the keys, and after the project is done, hire a locksmith to rekey all to one key. 3. Buy a nationally recognized brand(ie. Kwikset, Schlage), not dexter, weiser, or master.
just my 2 cents worth.
Jack
Reply to
Jack
I disagree. The locks will need to be put on before the homeowner moves in to prevent vandalism. Therefore the contractor will need keys. You should have them only rekeyed once and that should be AFTER the construction process.
Jack
Reply to
Jack
The contractor only needs a key to one door. That lockset can be keyed after the fact, but the other locksets should be keyed alike at the time of purchase. It's cheaper and faster that way.
R
Reply to
RicodJour
Or, at a big box, go for one of the better entry sets, sold as part of a group, keyed-alike. Works for me- tossed lots of keys, and use one now.
At the very worst, installing such a lockset, with holes at least partly cut, is a minor carpentry exercise in hand chiseling. Do consider attaching striker to jambs with loooong deck-screws. The ones made from reasonably tough steel.
HTH, J
Reply to
barry
You could buy the best equipment from a 'smith and ask about other security add-ons like strike plate, reinforcement brackets around the dead bolt, deep-set bolt and latch receivers with 3" screws. Also, ask the builder to reinforce the jamb so that the 3" screws are biting into wood and not just poking into space!
Reply to
C & E
"tomas wilson" <willyb snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in message news:dq4d1l$ffg$ snipped-for-privacy@domitilla.aioe.org...
he probably gave ya good advice. the (pre-drilled) holes and strikes will probably need to be adjusted !
Reply to
Key
agree...
have them keyed before installing.
not Kwikset ?
Reply to
Key
Mine does just that.
It polishes up nice with Brasso.
Do you have a suggestion how to keep it shiny, or at least more shiny than it gets?
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Reply to
mm
Might be a good idea, if there are two locks on the front door, for example, to have them different. That way you can leave the door locked with one lock, and give a temporary visitor or contractor one key, while never giving out the key that fits all the other locks.
Or that might be a nuisance.
The burglar alarm might have the same feature, if there is one. Have to think about all this...
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Reply to
mm

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