Magnetic Susceptibility of Dental Amalgams



Samuel F.B. Morse was alive during WWII?
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yup at least he was according to the internet. By the way, how do you translate Japanese alphabet into dots and dashes?
JOEL

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pretty good for someone born in 1791, don't you think?

http://homepages.cwi.nl/~dik/english/codes/morse.html#japanese http://www.ac6v.com/japmorse.htm http://a1club.net/CW_J_e.htm
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As far as the internet goes, all things are possible. Did you know that we have a poster who ALMOST DIED from too many amalgam fillings?
JOEL

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joel M. Eichen D.D.S. wrote:

My ARRL Handbook lists "Morse Codes for Other Languages", Japanese, Thai, Korean, Arabic, Hebrew, Russian, & Greek.
--
cheers, Cecil http://www.qsl.net/w5dxp



-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dots ... dashes ... confuses the heck out of those Asians .......
JOEL

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I know where to find all the others, but I'd be interested to see the Thai encoding.
Google on "thai morse" gives nothing but restaurants in Louisiana.
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thai encoding? Anything like Thai noodles?

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wonsen, bamii or guaytiao? I'd guess more like Sanskrit, actually.
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Herring wrote:

. sara-a, .. sara-e, .- sara-r, --- sara-o, ..-- sara-eu, .-.- sara-air ---. sara-u, ..-.. sara-ie, ..-.- sara-au, ..--. sara aue, .-... sara-ar .-..- sara-i
I have no idea what all that means. Are those sounds?
--
73, Cecil http://www.qsl.net/w5dxp



-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, they're the names of the vowels ("sara" is Thai for "vowel".) How about the consonants - does it give six different forms for 't' ?
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard Herring wrote:

They list three things that start with a 't': - tor-tow; -..-- tor-tahan; -.-.. tor-tung
--
cheers, Cecil http://www.qsl.net/w5dxp



-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fair enough. It looks as though they've taken just the commonest letter from each phonological class, so the results may look a bit fonetik, but they should still be understandable.
--
Richard Herring

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cecil Moore wrote:

I've only seen two episodes of that show.
The first episode that I saw, they were unable to make a workable ice bullet and concluded that it couldn't be done, but logic doesn't work that way. In order to prove that something can't be done, not only must your experiment fail, but you must also prove that there is no better way to make the attempt.
Their attempt was super lame. They were oblivious to the concept of making clear ice. It looked as if they didn't know any more about ice, than what you could glean from drinking soda pop.
In the other episode that I saw, the question was, "does a microwave cook food from the inside?" Somehow they thought they could do this, without comparing differential temperatures between the inside and outside of food cooked in microwave and food cooked by convection or conduction.
--
pete

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are far more electrical processes than the firing of synapses going on. As an example, just hold the two leads of a voltmeter in your hands and you will see voltages all over the map, just as strong as what the Dutch guys measured. The Dutch experiment is measuring V(amalgam) + V(body), where V(body) is a highly time dependent, essentially unpredictable quantity. The Dutch did not do the work to **coherently** decouple these two values, especially when theory predicts V(amalgam) = 0.
Here is a direct analogy to the fallacy that I pointed out: turn on a tv and use a volt meter to measure the potential across some random resistor on one of the tv's circuit boards. Claiming that this non-zero potential is due to active power generation in the resistor is pure junk and is no different than what the Dutch guys are doing by measuring the potential between an amalgam and some point in the oral cavity. If back in my grad school days you were in my EE circuits lab, you would have gotten an F for making conclusions based on such a clearly unsound circuit diagnostic approach.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 18:42:00 -0000, "David Robbins"

Someone else raised this point recently.
I think it's a valid question.
Being purely speculative about it, one might suggest that if the electrical potentials generated by amalgam fillings ARE able to dissipate electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads, then any neurological effect might be arbitrary in nature.
Put simply; it might make some people happy, it might make some people unhappy, and it might cause what are commonly referred to as "mood swings" in others.
However, speculation on its own does not constitute science.
We should need some kind of observed evidence to determine the degree to which any such kinds of influences occur.
For example, is there any significant level of "irrational fear" of going to the dentist in our society?
Is there any significant level of "irrational predilection" for going to the dentist in our society?
And other such questions.
Putting speculation aside, we know reasonably well for certain that metal amalgam dental fillings generate electrical potentials with magnitudes of up to 350 millivolts. See:
http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/dutch.htm
However, in addition to the fact that experimental studies to determine whether or not these potentials are able to dissipate electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads have never been carried out, it also appears that it is not fully explained as to how they arise.
Dentists confidently tell us that newly placed amalgam fillings quickly acquire a layer of metal oxide on their exposed surfaces as the result of a small degree of electrolytic corrosion, and that this layer adheres permanently to the surface thereby preventing further electrolysis from taking place.
I have no reason to doubt that this is the case.
However, it has been known for more than 160 years that metals, mixtures of metals, and dissimilar metals in contact with each other are able to generate electrical potentials as a result of their thermoelectric properties, and that it is not necessary for there to be any electrolysis taking place in order for this to happen.
It has also been known for more than 160 years that when an electrical conductor moves in an electromagnetic field an electromotive force is induced in the conductor, and that when a stationary conductor is subjected to a varying electromagnetic field then an electromotive force is again induced in the conductor.
According to the established principles of scientific understanding, in order to eliminate the possibility that the generation of these potentials is contributed to by the thermoelectric and/or electromagnetic properties of dental amalgams, it should be necessary to measure them.
Nevertheless it appears that there isn't anyone anywhere in the world who knows what the electromagnetic properties (including magnetic susceptibility) of dental amalgams are.
And it also appears that there isn't anyone anywhere in the world who knows what the thermoelectric properties of dental amalgams are.
(A dental amalgam is an inhomogeneous mixture of dissimilar metals, a typical example of which can be seen at:
http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/setting.htm
It might be expected therefore that its physical properties should vary accordingly from point to point within the material. Establishing what influence, if any, that this variation might have on the electrical behavior of the material might also require experimental investigation.)
As things stand, anyone who wished to find out the extent to which the electrical potentials generated by the amalgam fillings in their teeth were compromising their ability to feel contentment would have to be satisfied with the only honest answer which the dental or any other profession could give: "I'm sorry we have no idea."
And amalgam fillings continue to be placed in children's teeth.
Keith P Walsh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

not
Do you have any reason to believe that it could make people crave bagels and lox?
carabelli
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So you are saying that monoamine oxidase inhibitors are actually baked inside the bagels and lox?

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL! - why not, until the science has been done anythings possible. OTOH the brain is used to recognising pain as the only message coming from the teeth, apart from slight proprioceptor activity. Why should it interpret the current produced by amalgams as something else?
--
madiba

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.