cold cutting circular saw

Hello,
I am looking around at differenct machines and came across what is known as
a cold cutting circular saw. Looks like a chop saw but has a different type
of blade that spins much slower.
Would you use the same type of cutting tool as on a horizontal mill that you
wanted to use for slitting?
Are these machines at all popular? I was looking on web and found almost no
info on them.
Thanks
Reply to
V8TR4
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Oh, yes. These are used by steel fabricators. And no, you wouldn't use one on a mill. Search on "cold saw". - Grant
V8TR4 wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
cold cutting circular saw. Looks like a chop saw but has a different type of blade that spins much slower.
wanted to use for slitting?
Reply to
AZOTIC
cold cutting circular saw. Looks like a chop saw but has a different type of blade that spins much slower.
wanted to use for slitting?
You could use a slitting saw blade on a small cold saw, i have set up my small barker horizontal mill as a cold saw when i needed to cut a couple of hundred stainless steel blanks prior to machining the finished part.
Cold saws are popular with industries that need to perform precission cuts without any burrs on raw material prior to other machining operations. Most cold saws can preform cuts to within .005" on a production bassis.
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
AZOTIC
They are an alternative to an accurate angle cutting bandsaw and a lot quieter than an abrasive chop saw. I have used them in several shops when doing handrailing. A good quality soluble cutting or saw fluid does the trick. You also have the choice of high speed steel blades or if you have the money carbide tipped blades. They are specifically designed for the machines. They are not fast cutting but deadly accurate and they give a burr free cut ready for assembly. Randy
Hello,
I am looking around at differenct machines and came across what is known as a cold cutting circular saw. Looks like a chop saw but has a different type of blade that spins much slower.
Would you use the same type of cutting tool as on a horizontal mill that you wanted to use for slitting?
Are these machines at all popular? I was looking on web and found almost no info on them.
Thanks
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
The one that I saw looked a lot like a portable circular saw, but to see it cut 1/4 inch steel plate was kind of awesome. I recall it being priced around $500. I do not know what RPM it spun at. It had a chip catcher that caught many of the chips, but not all. If you had to make straight cuts in the field, it would be very useful, very fast. I did not ask about other materials, assume that it would not be a good choice for alloy steel or stainless.
Richard
V8TR4 wrote:
Reply to
Richard Ferguson
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This website gives you an idea of what a cold saw is and what it does. I have actually used a Scotchman. They are not the most rigid but it did the job. Randy
Hello,
I am looking around at differenct machines and came across what is known as a cold cutting circular saw. Looks like a chop saw but has a different type of blade that spins much slower.
Would you use the same type of cutting tool as on a horizontal mill that you wanted to use for slitting?
Are these machines at all popular? I was looking on web and found almost no info on them.
Thanks
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
A friend of mine has a fab shop and he contends that the money for the cold saw was some of the best bucks he has spent.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Careful of the terminology here. There is a difference between a "cold saw" and a "dry cut saw." The former is usually heavier, has been around longer, and uses cutting fluid. A dry cut saw is (I think) a more recent development. It uses a carbide blade and no cutting fluid.
Ciao, David Todtman
Reply to
David Todtman
They won't be around to post the results?
-- BLueCoBra
-- Please pardon my driving, I'm reloading.
Reply to
BLueCoBra

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