FS: 1964 Machinery's Handbook

for sale:
1964 Machinery's Handbook; 17th edition in good shape showing some wear, nothing bad just one that has seen use in an office environment of an
aircraft parts designer. photos available upon request.
$18.00 + actual USPS shipping charges w/ mandatory delivery confirmation & optioanal insurance; email replies, tnx in advance.
barry carson city, nv
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Barry Tuttleman
Carson City, Nevada
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barry wrote:

I have a couple spares I don't need also a 16th and a 20th . ...lew...
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 03:55:38 GMT, Lew Hartswick

I'd love one of those, preferably the 20th if you still have it. The damn dog ate mine, literally.
To bang out the details, please ping me at snarl 67 at trip dot net. Remove the spaces and change the obvious.
Thanks!
Snarl
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I'll take it if not spoken for. Paypal or check?
Wes
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barry wrote:

The older Handbooks have a lot more usable information for the rcm machinist than the newer books.
John
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 10:43:05 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, john

Right. And I only paid $4 for my 1953 edition.
- Metaphors Be With You -
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Lary, in what ways it is true that older editions are more valuable? Was something useful removed from later editions? I would actually like to buy a machinery handbook and would like to know a little bit more.
i
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 18:09:39 -0500, the renowned Ignoramus5179

I think all the trig table crap was removed (and good riddance).
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 20:12:36 -0500, Spehro Pefhany

If that's what was removed, then yes, good riddance.
i
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Ignoramus5179 wrote:

The older ones covered more HSS tooling use as well as some machining operations that have since gone out of style in industry, like shaping and planing.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Trevor, thanks, I simply bought the latest edition. It will be my book to read when I have nothing else to read. I have a pirated CDROM and found it a great resource for looking things up in a hurry, but it is not good enough for exploration, idle reading etc.
i
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Ignoramus32209 wrote:

I've about four or five versions, between home and work. The 26th ed. on CDROM is good, better than the 25th, anyways, as it is in PDF format so you can search and print off what you need without having to load proprietary software. I hate having to sit and read the stuff on screen, and am much happier to print out what I want and read it off paper.
I don't find them to be a "reading" kind of book. More of a reference chart of all reference charts.
I have had 17th, 20th, and 23rd editions, and now have the 23rd at home, having given away the others. I use the 25th and 26th pretty much interchangeably at work. Some of the tooling and metals lists have evolved, but the mainstay of the information has not changed since dirt was invented, so it really is not required for a hobby guy to run out and get the latest one.
The very old ones are the best for the hobbiests, as they were written about the same time as the machines most of us aspire to were the mainstay of the trade.
The sort of book that you can live without, but it is easier to have. Sacrilige, I know, but a new hobbiest would be better off with a lot of other books first, as the Machinery's Handbook is a book of charts and lists, rather than a how-to book.
I like the Machinist's Bedside Reader series for showing the new guys a whole lot of options and making them think.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Trevor Jones wrote:

Excellent point, Machinery's Handbook will tell you all about a stub acme thread and give you all the dimensions, but you must already know how to run a lathe and use a mike. It does give a lot of good information but you better already know how to use tools and machines.
John
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IIRC my 5th edition has a bit on rail road stuff in it amongst other things that are no longer current.
Wes
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Anything on making staybolts or cutting tires?
John
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I saw info on the load capacity of rails which seemed a bit quaint. I'll try to look this weekend for other railroad related stuff. I wish my grandfather was still with us. He was a maintenance supervisor with the Pennsylvania Railroad he likely knew something about your question.
Wes
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On Fri, 04 May 2007 18:32:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Talk about railroad construction, forty years ago I was charged with justifying the material billed by CPR for the relocation of ~5 miles of main line plus ~3 miles of passing track in conjunction with construction of a major water conservation/flood control reservoir. To start things off, the CPR construction inspector and I walked the project end to end while he explained railroad construction. When we got back to the office, I proceeded to figure out the material used and started to explain some of my calculations. He responded with "Gerry, don't bother, I don't have a clue what you are talking about because I left school when I turned eight years old and can't do math more than add and subtract, and don't read or write more than to sign my name." I worked with that man for about two weeks, and in the end came up with a figure within one percent of his final total. He may not have had any certificates on the wall, but he sure knew railway construction. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

I did some machinng of tires for a steam engine last year and again this March. I have an upcoming job to machine a number of boiler staybolts for a steam engine rebuild. Of course we are cheating... using a cnc lathe for the staybolts. The one engine has over 340 staybolts in its boiler. I would sure hate to do them on a manual lathe.
John
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John,
Page 1056 has dimensions for regular and spindle staybolt taps. Does that help?
Wes
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Thanks, I was just wondering what they said about them. I have a set of prints to work by. There are two different sets of them, one has straight v threads on both ends and the other has a tapered thread on one end and a straigh thread on the other.
John
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