How to part out a snow plow truck

I bought a couple of trucks.
formatting link

formatting link

They were barely used by the CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) to spread
salt. 10k and 15k miles respectively.
However, they sat around for a long time and their beds are shot due
to rust damage from salt. In general, I doubt very much that anyone
would want them as a whole.
I no longer have salt spreaders from them.
My question is what do I try to sell after scrapping the bodies.
1) Front snow plow mount
2) PTO pump and hydraulic tank and control for dump bed
3) Dump cylinder
4) Cat 3116 diesel engines
5) Automatic transmissions
6) Rear Axles
7) Almost brand new tires (to be used on my other equipment, not to be
sold)
8) Salt Spreader Controls
9) Front Dash
Anything else?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus26595
Loading thread data ...
If the beds are all that ar damaged, remove them and sell the rest intact. People wreck dumps and need to get back to work. They could move the bed from another truck a lot easier than rebuilding a wrecked one.
Someone rolled a dump used buy a tree service in front of my church a few years ago. the owner of the truck got there before the cops and was calling around to find parts before they arrived. He found them 500 miles away & sent his gofer to pick them up. That was a Saturday, and the truck was back in service by Monday.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
That's just about exactly what I was going to say. At least, except for the story about the wreck.
Some enterprising soul may even want to buy one and weld a new bottom into the bed. (I'm not saying that's smart -- just that someone may do it).
If they're drivable I think I'd take a stab at selling them intact, and only part them out if that didn't seem to be working.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I wonder if GMC sells those with undercoated frames, or if CTA had them protected before use. But did you see the center console screws? The interiors seemed to be totally corroded, too. I wouldn't trust the wiring.
Wow!
Reply to
Larry Jaques
The frames are OK, but a lot of other things have a lot of rust.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
Those are "dump trucks" right?
Why not advertize them in the southern states. If they are low milage..a company could buy them, and simply put their old dumps on the new trucks and be golden.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
I will see, it is kind of a fun project. One starts, but one fitting for transmission oil cooler was rotten.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
...
I looked at one (not even sure now which; perhaps the newer??)...
Other than the bed, a little sandblasting and some paint and they'll go for years...
Iggy, you seem to think a little surface rust and a perhaps a hole or two in a piece of body tin disqualifies something from functioning... :) That may be so for personal vehicles or for the boss's fancy 4WD Cummins Ram that he never gets off the freeway with, but not so much for the _real_ work truck. If the City didn't have taxpayers to fund them, they would have kept those in better condition...
They ain't _close_ to worn out from what I see.
Remove beds, scrap them and sell 'em...if you can get 'em to run again, first, that's a plus.
Reply to
dpb
...
The other pertinent piece of information would be how much do you have in them, roughly?
Reply to
dpb
Not with less than 10k miles on them. And yeah..thats typical treatment for big Leftwing city gear. Taxpayers will buy em another..no problem!
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Yes, I will try. I will report my result. I know that one does start.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
Roughly I have $900 in both after selling off something off of them.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
Yes, it is not their money.
Common to taxpayer funded entities, big companies, and almost bankrupt companies,
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
Gunner, I don't know your geographic history, but I grew up in the Salt Belt, and worked in the 2-way radio business there...including municipal accounts. I also fixed my own cars.
I'm not surprised low-mileage but not low-years salt trucks were scrapped. Until you have worked on such, it's hard to imagine how badly deteriorated such vehicles can really be.
I recall looking for solid sheet metal to put the radio mounting bracket... and not finding any.
A friend had bought a classic 65 Galaxy 500 ragtop, and we thumped on the box frame with a mallet....and most of it was on the shop floor.
Further, every bolt, nut, screw or other fastener will be seized. The Breath of the Dragon is a close partner in any repair job. So is Kroil. Even so, you will be drilling out the snapped-off ones....and any Phillips head screws.
Working on car is so much more fun now than it was there.
Reply to
David Lesher
Yeah, they are seriously rusted. I think that a few things are indeed salvageable and usable, but I am not so sure that someone will want these trucks as a whole.
Say, the engine on one, runs good .
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5654
I grew up in Northern Michigan, but up there..we tarred, painted or Zeibarted our frames and running gear and didnt have anywhere near those problems. I left in 1971 and really never came back for any length of time.
Now I live in the high desert and am surrounded by guys with 30s, 40s and 50s cars and trucks. Every street has a virtual fleet of them. They simply dont die out here in the desert. Windows may turn blue..upholstery may turn to dust...but its all fixable.
formatting link

If you browse around the photos..you will notice a lot of the old trucks came right out of the oil fields. Many of them are preserved, not rebuilt and have been in the area since new. Same with the autos.
Lots of 60s and 70s cars..but they arent as "cool" as the older cars. Friend of mine has owned the same Mach 1 since he bought off the lot in 1969. Shrug...we dont have salt problems here. Not even on the coast.
Gunner
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
I saw your other posting but unless it just isn't showing, the bodies don't look that bad--they still got doors and fenders, for heaven's sakes!!! :)
For no more than that in them, I'd think a little cosmetic work and being's one at least seems to run you'd get more value in less time as cab and chassis than trying to part 'em out. Eventually you'd probably be able to unload almost all the useable parts, but it would take warehousing them until and unless it's a local "come and strip/use your own tools" kind of a thing I'd think you'll end up w/ more time/effort in them that way and have the mess to clean up after anyway...
Stuff like that often becomes a chassis for dry fertilizer spreaders or, w/ longer wheelbase, feedwagon chassis for the large feedlots, etc., out here...
Reply to
dpb
Yes. I will keep you posted.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13436
...
...
....
Iff'en were closer (by about 4-500 mi :) ), I'd be interested meself, in fact...
Reply to
dpb
It can be shipped on a stepdeck semi trailer
Reply to
Ignoramus21868

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.