Kindling maker

I want to make a hand operated kindling maker. When I split logs, I split some about 1? thick, kind of like planks. But I don't like using a hatchet,
knowing me and the laws of probability will probably get me the nickname of Stumpy eventually.
Anyone see or could suggest a model for just splitting off small kindling sized pieces of wood? I was thinking of making a hand model like the old beer can piercers of the 1950's with a lever and a wedge, putting the piece of wood close to the attachment point of the lever, where there's the most leverage. Or make a hatchet that would have a bolt through the end of the handle, and just drop onto the end of a standing piece of wood to cut off a small slice.
Looking for something slightly automated, as carpal tunnel getting real bad.
Steve
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Froe
jsw
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Yup.
Recalling that we used an old bowling pin for a mallet.
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message >

To be pedantic, you beat on a froe with a "beetle".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
Òh1ofWW35k
jsw
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On Thu, 20 Dec 2012 21:24:55 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

This one looks very very easy to make

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=_olacH1hlWg&NR=1

I LIKE IT!!!
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While you're at Home Depot for the roof patch.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/202531238/5yc1v?catalogId 053&langId=-1&keyword=digging+bar&storeId051&N=5yc1v&R 2531238#.UPF41PI_euI
http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/202024132/5yc1v?catalogId 053&langId=-1&keywordþnce+post+pounder&storeId051&N=5yc1v&R 2024132#.UPF4-PI_euI
meld these two together.
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wrote:

My dad used a 12 year old kid to make kindling - paid him $0.10 an hour as I remember. (I've still got all my fingers :?)
--
Cheers,
John B.
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What you're looking for is the full-scale version of the old Ronco Veg-O- Matic slicer.
That sounds like a worthy metalworking project to me!
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Home built trip hammer with a splitting edge instead of a hammer head.
--
Steve W.

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I watched one at an antique engine meet. The operator ran it continuously and it looked like a fast way to lose meat. The froe keeps the wood from falling over with your steadying hand above the descending edge rather than below it. A slow-moving hydraulic splitter is dangerous enough as is.
jsw
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English "Captive hatchet"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko0Dv26SCAA

http://www.logsplittersworld.co.uk/p/Smart_14_Ton_Manual_Log_Splitter.htm
Yeah, I'm Stumpy
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wrote:

That for damn sure ain't live oak.

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wrote:

Thats a pretty damned good idea!!
Thanks for posting that!!

Gunner, who lives in the desert where there is no wood.
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You bet.
The Nordic one you showed Jim would be easier to fabricate.
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wrote:

Ive got a as yet uninstalled wood stove in my shop and while I need some stove pipe (expensive shit!!!) to go through a steel roof...I think Ill fab up a spltter like that. I run into some wood on occasion and while a lot of it is pine lumber scraps...I can snag a few cut down trees every now and then.
Anyone have any good ideas where to get stove pipe? And do I really need double wall, simply for a shop heater?
Gunner
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Gunner wrote:

Ask your insurance company. You may lose all coverage if you don't.
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 09:31:52 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

Insurance? Whats that?
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wrote:

No, the double wall would route the heat outside. Save the double walled stuff for safely going thru walls/roofs. Devise a way to capture all of the heat from the pipe and blow it around the "shop". (Got full walls and a sealed envelope yet?) That keeps bare arms and hands away from the hot pipe, too.
Got a metal fabber and folder? Make your own tube from sheetmetal. Audel put out a handy book on sheetmetal work early in the last century and it's still valid.
--
Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace.
-- Robert J. Sawyer
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 07:27:00 -0800, Larry Jaques

Ah... so you know about his POS "shop" and suspect that years later it's still not closed in. That's because you know how lazy slobs function, or more correctly, don't function. It's clear he doesn't know the first thing about woodstoves. Yet you're giving him advice on installing one? Even if he somehow gets it going he'll burn all sorts of crap in it. Do you really think he's going to clean his chimney every year? The fact is he's way more likely than the average guy to fuck it up and burn down his dunny. Oh well, I'm sure his insurance company will be sympathetic about an amateur cheap ass woodstove installation. As if he pays insurance!

Arf arf. Projects like that are for people who are motivated, not people who spend their lives pretending that they might someday suddenly find motivation.
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My insurance cares only that it was inspected, and doesn't have a creosote-collecting heat exchanger. The stack temperature needs to be at or above 100C to maintain a good draft. A lot of experimentation with thermocouples and a sensitive vacuum gauge merely confirmed that the recommendations on the flue thermometer were correct. http://www.condar.com/stovepipe_meters.html

The one section of commercial single-wall stainless steel flue pipe I have indoors was overlapped and spot-welded.
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