Leak in a Hyster forklift

On Sat, 17 Mar 2012 12:59:39 -0500, Ignoramus13020


Iggy, first of let me set the record straight. My desired work is on electric lifts... less tools less dirty work :-) Although I can, I try not to work IC trucks.
I am a road tech and as such the transmission leak would be classified as a shop job. With that being said, I have never had this transmission apart so I can't tell you where to start. That there may be several causes for a leak in your machine. This means its going need to come apart to repair it. Again its a shop job because it requires special tooling. You could probably get it apart to see what's leaking but that's going to require either pulling the counter weight and then pulling the engine, tranny as an assemble or pulling the mast and drive axle. Either way its a costly job. Sorry I don't have a better answer.
Jeff
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Sad that there are a few here in RCM that will typically contradict all other opinions and insist on posting misinformation, until they're addressed by someone with an actual working background and experience in a field, comes along to post the correct information.
Ig should tear down his lift to find the leak just for the experience, if nothing else.
Or.. he could figure out how to check the lift's fluids (all of 'em) to determine an accurate assessment of how much is leaking per day/week.
Then he should be able to make sure the fluid levels are checked regularly and topped off.. or have the lift properly repaired.
Unlike many other situations where the truck's purchase cost and repair costs/down time could be a significant factor, Ig can probably find a replacement truck without suffering a huge loss of money or down time.
I prefer repairing my own stuff.. that way one knows what they have, and that the repairs were done correctly (but I don't even do my own car repairs anymore, mainly because I don't need to).
--
WB
.........


"jeff" < snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com> wrote in message
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WB, while I generally agree with what you say, I am also wary of tearing into stuff that I do not understand. This does not work out well every time, unfortunately. There is a lot of variables and unknowns here. I saw a discussion where someone said that the problem was not leaky transmission case, but instead, the fact that trans oil was sprayed where it was not supposed to go.
http://www.justanswer.com/heavy-equipment/1hrt5-hyster-h50f-sci.electronics.repair-b3d4250l-monotrol-pedal-leaking-trans-fluid.html
If the above opinion was true and correct, tearnig the forklift apart would not necessarily lead me to success.
i
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On Mar 18, 8:00 am, Ignoramus32296 <ignoramus32...@NOSPAM. 32296.invalid> wrote:

There's a fairly simple way of checking what's leaking and where, and that's UV dye that can be had at NAPA. There are types that can be had that are both water- and oil-soluble and flouresce in different colors. I use a UV scorpion light for looking, it's just a UV flashlight and can be found pretty cheaply online. If you've got multiple possibilities, you add the dye to one possible source at a time, then check for leaks. I've used this system for ATF, engine oil, power steering, and coolant, works great. Finds the drip-a-day ones, too. Sometimes it's as simple as a clamp that's hidden and needs tightening. In another case, it was a radiator damaged at a lower corner but didn't look like it. Glowed like a demon, though. You just have to make sure the dye gets cleaned off before finding the NEXT leak.
Stan
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And.. that was why I suggested that it's a matter of keeping all the fluids topped off, every day.
This was a routine included in everyday checks before the daylight shift started using the trucks (IC and electric types) when I was doing industrial maintenance. It's not only a good idea from a maintenance/service position, but also as a matter of safety. Otherwise, some worker may hop on a truck after sitting overnight and run it across the shop without seeing the big puddle of brake fluid underneath it.
So, for you at least, just keeping the fluids topped off probably wouldn't cost much.. until another forklift bargain comes along. I didn't realize I'd have to spell it out for you.
Nothing is maintenance-free.. if you want a forklift that doesn't require you to repair or maintain it, you'll likely need to buy a new one with an on-site maintenance, service and repair contract.
Your save of that pfd still doesn't seem to werk.
And you should know, there is a lot of inaccurate info posted to web forums.. like adding some miracle product to the oil to stop a leak.
Cottage cheese and pepper is good.
--
WB
.........


"Ignoramus32296" <ignoramus32296@NOSPAM.32296.invalid> wrote in message
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Jeff, look at this discussion:
http://www.justanswer.com/heavy-equipment/1hrt5-hyster-h50f-sci.electronics.repair-b3d4250l-monotrol-pedal-leaking-trans-fluid.html
This is a newsgroup post, actually, web spammed by justanswers.
The problem mentioned was hydraulic leak near the starter from a Hyster S50E, just like what I have.
What the guy there is saying, is that the problem was not leaky transmission, but the fact that some spraying tube was not pointed right, or some such.
Any comments?
i
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The leak does not work, but the web page was there. I "printed it to PDF" and saved it here:
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Hyster-H50F-Sci.electronics.repair-B3D4250L-Monotrol-pedal,leaking-trans-fluid-JustAnswer.pdf
i

http://www.justanswer.com/heavy-equipment/1hrt5-hyster-h50f-sci.electronics.repair-b3d4250l-monotrol-pedal-leaking-trans-fluid.html
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 09:51:11 -0500, Ignoramus32296

Iggy, The link didn't work but I was able to backtrack to get to it.
let me get this straight, your truck has a powershift transmission (no clutch) with a monotrol pedal. Three oil lines leaving side of the pedal going to the control valve on the tranny.
I'm not going to get to this untill tomorrow or tuesday. I will have a chat with a fellow tech who has way more experience than me on transmissions
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The pdf link should work.

yes!
jeff, you are the most awesome human being, thanks a lot.
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 12:29:46 -0500, Ignoramus32296

nope error 401 I had to backspace to your temp folder and go from there

\
GEEEEEZZZZZZZZZZZ Like DUDE.... your welcome :-) I am out of my expertise with trannys by will do my best. I'm just trying to help in an area I'm familiar with.
By the way, I was checking out your ebay stuff and saw that marklift sizzor lift. If you end up selling that them make sure that you hold no responsibility on it. I had to investigate one falling over one time hurting two employees of a business I service.
It was their responsibility to do and ANSI and annual inspection on it. No one did it and when the two operators were 20" up with a maybe too large load one of the worn out signor ear bushings blew out. Over she went... not a pretty picture in a busy warehouse.
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On 3/18/2012 1:03 PM, jeff wrote: ...

I bought a JLG 40H thru a broker (in FL) which was locate in Chicago area. It was my understanding then that IL _required_ a currently-valid OSHA check on the unit before it could be sold as operational.
I don't know the details specifically; I do know the unit had indeed had a recertification and a couple of small repairs to equipment (like the backup beeper replaced) before it was sold.
It's another of those things that could be a gotcha' Ig needs to check if is so or not or whether he can disclaim any knowledge/responsibility/liability in that regard or not.
--
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dpb wrote:

"Sold as-is for parts only. Buyer acknowledges that it is their responsibility to comply with all regulations and inspections if the unit is placed into service."
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On 3/18/2012 5:15 PM, Pete C. wrote: ...

Good try... :) Not sure if that'll fly or not if push came to shove.
The only two Marklift scissors I currently can find on eBay in the general neighborhood of Chicago (where I think iggy is?) are one from a clear handler of such equipment that promises a current ANSI compliance certification and the appropriate user manuals, safety instructions, etc., with it just like the broker from FL w/ whom I dealt.
The other is from a general retailer site storefront (I can't tell if it's Iggy or not; no hints in that direction I see, anyway) that doesn't have any such promises but says "...used scissor lift in good working condition, needs nothing ready to work today..." which would make me nervous as seller unless it did have up-to-date certification and I had ensured myself I had dotted all the tee's and crossed all the eye's of whatever regulations are applicable.
--
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dpb wrote:

Search for "mark industries scissor" to find Iggy's.
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Good. Here's an easier link:
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Hyster-H50F.pdf

Awesome! The serial number is this: D002D13868G, if anyone needs it.

Yep.
Scary! I do have a language that it is sold as is and it is the buyer's responsibility to conduct a professional safety evaluation.
i
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On 3/18/2012 2:49 PM, Ignoramus32296 wrote: ...

But are you certain that's enough?
NB--I'm not saying it isn't; only that there was at least an implication to me that it was at least required to be current if not reinspected before a sale on the manlift. That assurance was the only reason I was willing to take a chance on it sight unseen--figured if it passed OSHA at least it had to be functional to start with... :)
There are so many ways liabilities can be passed backwards I'd want to be sure I knew any legal requirements before transferring title.
--
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DANG! That's the _ONLY_ time I've ever seen anyone but me issue a "nota bene"! GOOD on ya'!
LLoyd
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2012 14:49:18 -0500, Ignoramus32296

Iggy, I am very sorry for opening up a can of worms with the Marklift. I would just hate to have you go through the hassles of someone getting hurt if that thing should go over on its side shortly after you sell it.
I have not ANSI'ed a Marklift in a long time but I am certified to do so. Do yourself a favor before that thing leaves your yard.
Jack up all four wheels and check for any slop in the spindles and steer rods. These will fail at the most inopportune time.
Set it back down on the ground and use the aux raise switch to raise the platform up of its home position a few feet. When in that position, grab a pry bar that is long enough to give you leverage but will still fit between the ears/pivots of all the arms. If you notice any play when you pry on each point the truck wouldn't pass inspection without a total teadown.
Doing these two checks would at least make me comfortable. Once it leaves your yard all bets are off as to what the new owner might do stupidly. As a dealer we would have to do a thorough inspection on this unit and at that would cost more than the unit is worth
I would not pass the data plate because of its condition.
As a side note, the capacity on this thing is 1000lbs in optimal shape, throw a couple 200lb men on it with whatever other load while in a raised position and then roll one wheel into a hole or over a 2X4 and stand back, thats when shit will hit the pervervial fan.
contact me off line if you wish. Just add "bell" after my name in the headers of this post.
Off to bed
jeff
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Jeff, I used it to have my guy do compressed air piping near the ceiling.
I instructed him, in no uncertain terms, that he is NOT allowed to move this lift in a raised position. That is, he should lower himself, move the lift, and only then go up to the ceiling.
I think that the lift being unstable in a raised position, if it hits a pothole at a high enough speed, is a basic property of any lift, its center of gravity and the wheelbase.
So, the question is, as a seller of a used lift, what is my "duty of care", that is, what am I legally required to do to ensure buyer safety. I do not believe that I am required to perform an inspection, since I am not equipped with tools or knowledge to do so.
I am, certainly, required to 1) disclose all known defects and, possibly, 2) to warn the buyer to conduct a safety inspection prior to using this scissor lift.
i i i
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