Michelle pimping the airwaves

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Actually Iggy..many Americans donate 10% of their income to charity or to their church. Having all of your working expenses covered by the tax payers and being worth millions, and only kicking in $15k..is really not much.
Hell..Limbaugh donated $5 million last year..and he is an Evil Republican
Gunner
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
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I would like to see the official receipt that conforms to IRS standards.
If you can produce one, I will publicly thank you for your generosity.
I donated $50 and I do have a receipt.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
It seems that on average, Americans donate 2 percent (which is very generous).
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In 2006, Americans donated 2.2 percent of their average disposable, or after-tax, income, a figure above the 40-year average of 1.8 percent. Brooks told USINFO that he sees over the past 50 years ?a trend toward greater charitable giving? in the United States.
The Obama family gave much more than average.
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
Ignoramus29432 wrote in news:5c6dnUXhm-7ab8DWnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Yah - leftover DNC-supplied "Presidential Campaign Fund" donations from US Taxpayers who checked the "Yes" boxes on their 1040s.
Never forget that leftover campaign donations are considered as an IRA by the Infernal Revenue scumsuckers.
Reply to
Eregon
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So will I. I'll even throw in a bag of Darrell Lea Original.
Btw, his "wife" or whatever it is, split a $25,000.00 dissability settlement with him, collects a dissability check every month and the both of them are recieving food stamps.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
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Especially not if you are Haitian. They could as easily have given nothing. In fact, given the criticism I see here, they could have given nothing more easily.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
If it was out of generosity, they wouldn't have disclosed the amount. It was a political move, nothng else.
No, it doesn't. If the annual amount is too small, you get no writeoff.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
When Steve B posted his original post, I looked for "obama family donation haiti" and things like that, and could not find anything. At first I thought that it was rather disingenious for the President to not contribute anything. Then I looked a little bit more and found that Huffington Post article.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
What do you mean, considered as an IRA? I do not understand.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
They are required to disclose it.
If you itemize, as I would expect the Obama family to do, then any amount of charitable contributions reduces taxable income.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
MATH CHECK!
15,000/1,300,000 = ?% 15,000/3,000,000= ?%
What is Barry's income?
What % of Barry's income is $15,000?
And how much does he and Michelle deduct per year for underwear?
Someone do the math for me. I get something times 10 to the minus something power.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I never bother getting a receipt. I didnt make enough money last year to even bother filing. And I figure a donation out of pocket is exactly that. Not something the government needs to give back to me at the end of the year.
Gunner
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Right....oh hell yes
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Q. Do Americans mostly give because our tax system rewards it? A.The U.S. federal government and state governments make monetary gifts to public charities tax deductible. So if a taxpayer gives $1,000 and pays a tax rate of 35 percent on her last dollar of income, her donation saves her $350 in taxes.
The amount of taxes not paid because of donations is huge: it represents the single largest government ?matching grant? program ever. The Internal Revenue Service estimates that in 2002, individuals donated and deducted $142.4 billion in monetary and in-kind gifts. Breaking this figure down by income class and applying 2002 marginal tax rates for these classes, we can estimate that this represents foregone income tax revenues?and hence a government subsidy to nonprofit organizations?of about $37.2 billion.
Still, tax deductibility is actually irrelevant for most people. IRS records show that only about a third of people who file tax returns itemize their deductions?which means that most Americans (particularly middle- and lower-income citizens) don?t even claim the deductions to which they are entitled. Even among households earning over $120,000 per year, only about 40 percent itemize their deductions. Furthermore, research shows that virtually no one is motivated meaningfully to give only because of our tax system.
Q. How much do the rich in America give, compared with everyone else? A. In order for a person to give money away, he or she must have it in the first place. Not surprisingly then, income and charitable giving in America are positively related. For example, in the year 2000, families earning $20,000 or less gave an average of about $450 to charity, while families earning more than $100,000 gave away an average of a bit more than $3,000. The top 10 percent of households in income are responsible for at least a quarter of all the money contributed to charity, and households with total wealth exceeding $1 million give about half of all charitable donations. The American rich are generous, on average.
Low-income working families are the most generous group in America, giving away about 4.5 percent of their income on average.
Yet when we measure monetary giving as a percentage of income in order to ascertain the level of one?s ?sacrifice,? we find a surprising result: it is low-income working families that are the most generous group in America, giving away about 4.5 percent of their income on average. This compares to about 2.5 percent among the middle class, and 3 percent among high-income families.
One common explanation for the fact that the working poor give so much is, not surprisingly, religion. The working poor tend to belong to congregations that are relatively literal about Biblical injunctions to give. Data from 2000 show that these poor American families were roughly twice as likely as middle-class families to be Seventh-Day Adventists, Pentecostals, or Jehovah?s Witnesses. They were also significantly less likely to belong to more ?mainline??and less stringent?denominations such as Episcopalian, Methodist, and Presbyterian.
Who gives the most in America: conservatives or liberals? A. There is a persistent stereotype about charitable giving in politically progressive regions of America: while people on the political right may be hardworking and family-oriented, they tend not to be very charitable toward the less fortunate. In contrast, those on the political left care about vulnerable members of society, and are thus the charitable ones. Understanding ?charity? in terms of voluntary gifts of money (instead of government income redistribution), this stereotype is wrong.
The fact is that self-described ?conservatives? in America are more likely to give?and give more money?than self-described ?liberals.? In the year 2000, households headed by a conservative gave, on average, 30 percent more dollars to charity than households headed by a liberal. And this discrepancy in monetary donations is not simply an artifact of income differences. On the contrary, liberal families in these data earned an average of 6 percent more per year than conservative families.
These differences go beyond money. Take blood donations, for example. In 2002, conservative Americans were more likely to donate blood each year, and did so more often, than liberals. People who said they were ?conservative? or ?extremely conservative? made up less than one-fifth of the population, but donated more than a quarter of the blood. To put this in perspective, if political liberals and moderates gave blood like conservatives do, the blood supply in the United States would surge by nearly half.
One major explanation for the giving discrepancy between conservatives and liberals is religion. In 2004, conservatives were more than twice as likely as liberals to attend a house of worship weekly, whereas liberals were twice as likely as conservatives to attend seldom or never. There are indeed religious liberals in America, but they are currently outnumbered by religious conservatives by about four to one.
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I see.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29432
Iggy, you roll your eyes very quietly. d8-)
Reply to
Ed Huntress
On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 18:42:58 -0600, the infamous Ignoramus29432 scrawled the following:
So, you guys donated to Haiti. Did you also donate to New Orleans at Katrinatime? Whatever happened to donations to U.S. disasters? Our citizens still need local charity, guys.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Let the Record show that Gunner Asch on or about Mon, 25 Jan 2010 19:31:22 -0800 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Yep. Back around 1950, my Dad was a seminarian, and was student preaching at parish in Oakland (CA) back when it was working class and not hell-hole. My Dad noticed it was a poor working class parish, yet the Church was really "nice". ?How did they do that? He was told, in essence, that most of them were reformed drunks, and had thought nothing of dropping ten - twenty bucks at the tavern on a Saturday night. (And those were 1950 dollars, too). So, dropping a twenty in the offering plate on a Sunday was not a "big deal". Amazing how much money is available when you stop "sinning".
I also recall hearing a story about LBJ when he was running for state office in Texas, during the depression. He'd be out at a farm, no electricity, kids drinking 'blue milk' (a couple stages past "skim"), and other signs of poverty - and be told "well, times are tough, but we're getting by. You ought to head over to the Jones', they are in real need."
- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Let the Record show that Gunner Asch on or about Mon, 25 Jan 2010 16:36:08 -0800 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I just got my tax forms - I made what the Obama's donated to charity. I know I wrote a check for $100, and I'm sure there was more. But ... I'm sorry to see rich fat cats like them not giving their share back to the community.
-- pyotr filipivich "I made it to 2010 and all I got from the SciFi Books of my youth was the lousy dystopian government?
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Let the Record show that Gunner Asch on or about Mon, 25 Jan 2010 19:22:33 -0800 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
There's the tax write off, and there are alms. Shoot, I don't even keep track of the "spare change" I hand out. "Let's get some lunch, I'm buying." - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
No..I didnt donate to New Orleans. I did however donate up the coast east a bit.
Those who were so damned stupid to be stuck in NO..should have died there. Called survival of the fittest.
A friend of my dad is a property owner on the Gulf coast in Florida..and I sent him $200 to help out in local emergencies. As I understand it..he used it for gasoline for a community generator that took care of the power needs of about 150 people for about a week.
I had more money in those days.
Gunner
Whenever a Liberal utters the term "Common Sense approach"....grab your wallet, your ass, and your guns because the sombitch is about to do something damned nasty to all three of them.
Reply to
Gunner Asch

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