Michelle pimping the airwaves

The story about Gunner, who recently said he had no money, stopping by Red Cross and giving them a $100 cash donation, and not getting any receipt, does not sound believable. Does not mean that it is outright impossible, but it is not believable.
At this point, being a true agnostic, I do not believe the story to be true, but I am not certain that it is false, either.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus22882
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Yeah, I gathered what you meant. "I see" said it very eloquently. d8-)
Reply to
Ed Huntress
What's a little amusing is that Gunner thinks he didn't need to file on $18K. He owes the SE tax, about $1,500.00, on every dollar and the filing requirement kicks in at the same time - dollar one. I think, THINK mind you, that income in excess of $600 requires a filing but I'm not sure. What I am sure of is that filing isn't conditioned on owing the IRS or the FTB and anything over $1,200.00 requires a 1099 even if payment is made "in kind". Otherwise, whoever paid him owes his tax.
Gunner said he begun BK proceedings. I doubt that because if he had he'd know all of this and he aslo wouldn't be looking at bills from a hospital or anyone else. He'd have listed them all as creditors and that would be that. In California, it would be illegal for a named creditor to continue to pursue their claim outside of the court proceedings. Failing to list ALL of your income, assets, and creditors will cost him his house. It's a bad idea for him to continue any fraud that might have been going on in front of the court. In fact, it's a felony and California will forfiet his homestead act rights and protections in a heartbeat. I actually collected $27,000.00 from a guy this way once and boy as he ever P.O.'d. So was his mortgage lender.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
I saw that, but he may be right. Filing singly, the maximum is $9,350. If he's filing jointly, it is $18,700; married filing separately, it's $3,650. Less than that and you don't *have* to file. But I think he'd make out better if he filed; I don't know the rules on EITC.
That is, if his clients file 1099s.
More likely than fraud is repression and avoidance.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Nor do I but I know what the State of California requires.
California is a son of a bitch about this stuff Ed. They do payroll audits on a regular basis and the auditors get a bonus for what they collect. They also do sales tax audits periodically. At the end of the audit you just write a check if ther number is reasonable - meaning affordable. I've only heard about people that have put up a real battle. Every single person I know, myself included, has just written that check and grumbled.
The guy needs a clean break before it's to late. F'ing around isn't the way to get that result. He'll first have to admit his problem. Then he can go through the system and come out cleaned up. At that point, he'll be employable, at least in some meanial job. There are a dozen decent paying jobs right in Taft that he can't even apply for now. He'd have to pass a credit check for any of them and be elgible for a low level security clearance for a couple. He can do neither of those things today. He isn't even bondable.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
LOL Have you forgotten that he claims to have sold "all" his guns and machinery to his father? Yet he's always talking about selling stuff to cover this or that emergency. The only question is if he's defrauding his father , or his creditors. BTW, I'm with John, I don't believe gummer has or will file for bankruptcy. That would require that he intends to give his creditors *something*. No way he's going to give them a nickel unless they somehow force the issue, which is gonna' be tough with somebody who's been successfully dodging bills for his entire adult life.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
All good points. But I doubt that he wants to work at all, much less full time. He's dedicated to subsistence living. If either he or his wife can get on disability (assuming she isn't already) like his kid , he'll have more time for posting than he does now.
Anecdote: a guy I know needed a job desperately, but wasn't looking. When I tried to help out with the search, his friend told me that the guy felt deprived because everyone in his circle were getting checks of one sort or another, and that was his goal as well. He refused to accept that the others were qualified (on paper anyway) for their checks, but he wasn't. The deadbeat world can be a strange place.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
Those that tithe, give 10 % if they can. I am not in that group, I'd hate to create a false impression.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Do they now. Got a cite for that?
What impression were you hoping to create Wes?
I'll tell you , and anyone viewing this,something that you can do to create an impression. Send these guys socks, talcum powder and beef jerkey.
4th LAR Bn, H&S Company Unit 40650 fpo ap 96427-0650 Khan Neshin
Reply to
John R. Carroll
I know one family that tithes. Does that count as a cite?
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
I know one as well My own. We tithe on the basis of our biblical teaching, ie. first fruits. The ten percent thing is a bunch of evangelical bullshit. Jimmy Swaggert is a ten percenter. So is Crouch. What's ten percent of the cheap assed jets they fly? I mean come on, real men fly Falcon's or Challengers, not Lear's.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
You have to be alert for an occasional glimmer of truth in much of what Gunner writes. Sometimes he slips and tells it like it is.
Most of the handloading info probably is on the mark.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
What group is that? The group that believes in the Bible. Bible says 10%.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
On Tue, 26 Jan 2010 19:21:43 -0800, the infamous "Steve B" scrawled the following:
My neighbor (often known to be wrong) says that the Mormon church asks for a 40% tithe. Confirmation, anyone?
Reply to
Larry Jaques
If that's true, then they're totally misusing the word. From Dictionary.com:
Word History: A tithe is a tenth, etymologically speaking; in fact, tithe is the old ordinal numeral in English. Sound changes in the prehistory of English are responsible for its looking so different from the word ten. Tithe goes back to a prehistoric West Germanic form *tehuntha-, formed from the cardinal numeral *tehun, "ten," and the same ordinal suffix that survives in Modern English as -th. The n disappeared before the th in the West Germanic dialect area that gave rise to English, and eventually yielded the Old English form t=C4=93othe, "tenth," still not too different from the cardinal numeral t=C4=ABen. But over time, as the former became tithe and the latter ten, and as tithe developed the specialized meaning "a tenth part paid as a tax," it grew harder to perceive a relationship between the two. The result was that speakers of English created a new word for the ordinal, tenth, built with the cardinal numeral ten on the pattern of the other regularly-formed ordinal numerals like sixth or seventh.
Reply to
rangerssuck
Ignoramus29432 wrote in news:YPudnY0zFrTp18PWnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
An Individual Retirement Account.
All funds remaining in a candidate's Campaign Fund - once the final bills are paid - are considered to be just waiting for the next campaign.
The candidate - by declaring the amount as income on his/her/its tax return - can withdraw and spend as much or as little as desired.
IOW, for all practical purposes, Campaign Fund = IRA for politicians.
Reply to
Eregon
"Probably" isn't worth much to me when it comes to Usenet posters. Once I know that someone is BSing on a subject I know something about, how am I supposed to tell if they're doing the same on other subjects? If I need a consensus on those, I can get it quicker without having a question mark alongside the BSer's contribution. On the other hand it doesn't matter if I disagree with posters on some things, so long as they don't lose their credibility by BSing during the process.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
Sounds like "Big Love" is a documentary. What a twisted world.
Reply to
rangerssuck
I'll agree on the latter part. As for the former part, you're right, which is why I take everything that some posters say with a grain of salt. I know just enough about handloading to know where Gunner is on that stuff. I disagree with him about using Dacron fluff to fill cartridges for light target loads, for example, because I've done it and I get a melted mess in the throat. I use kapok. So do many other people. But many others agree with Gunner on it. Its viability probably varies with the gun and the load.
In any case, he isn't b.s.'ing about that stuff. He has two modes of discussion and you have to be alert to which one is in use. Anything political, assume b.s. and you'll be right 80% of the time. The same goes for Constitutional history, but that's just a result of a hop-scotch, self-selected self-education -- like Retief and Strabo.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I can only answer as an EX Mormon. The Mormon church wants members to tithe 10%. Ones who cannot are asked to perform duties instead. At the end of the year, you and your bishop have a tithing settlement where you are either asked to come up with the shortage or given a hearty back pat for any given in excess. None is ever refunded. Having a clean tithing history is a REQUIREMENT for entering certain parts of a temple, temple ceremonies, and positions of leadership in the church, even including janitor staff, which is a well paid life time job with benefits.
There is an old boy system in the church similar to the Masons. Many of the Mormon men ARE Masons. Lots of local business decisions are made by this cadre. And afterward, church members are encouraged to patronize members businesses, and severely chastised for patronizing non member businesses. A member in need is often sent by the bishop to a local Mormon businessman for a job, or a car, or whatever. A vig from the business is also expected for the opportunity to get the seal of approval, and the ongoing business support.
In some cases, it may go up to 40%, but when you basically have a monopoly on a good or service in a community, guaranteed continued success, and dependable profits, 60% can still leave you a good net, and the 40% is a good write off.
So, having a cement rock hard status and position in the community financial area, being a king of kings, and being a social pillar is worth giving away some of the money channeled to you through religious means.
HTH
Steve
Reply to
Steve B

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