Micrometer time!

John Halpenny snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com on Sat, 23 Jan 2021 08:09:45 -0800 (PST) typed >>
I once worked in a plant and was running Rev D on the CNC machine. Having a few moments, I looked at the next order - same part but Rev C. Double checking the program running - it was Rev E (I had not set this up). Hot stop, call the Foreman - "I think 'we' have a problem."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
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For digital micrometers which I don't use regularly (It is too cold to work in the shop right now) I open the battery compartment and flip the cell upside down (so it does not feed the power to anything), and pop the cap back on. This keeps it handy with the micrometer, but also keeps it fresh. I also keep a spare cell in the box the micrometer is stored in.
Most micrometers use the 357 and 44 sized cells (easy to remember -- both numbers are magnum calibers) and they are available in either alkaline or silver oxide variants. The battery life is much better in the silver oxide (I prefer SR-357 cells) -- and I believe they are also much less likely to leak and damage the micrometer.
Yes -- I also have pure analog micrometers too. Old eyes tell me I need to wear glasses to use them.
BTW I also have one Russian 0-25mm micrometer. It is beefier than all the others which I have or have used. I think the shaft is 8mm (about 5/16" instead of the more common 1/4" shaft on the others. I guess that I would not be too upset at seeing it used as a C-clamp. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
"DoN. Nichols" snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com on 25 Jan 2021 03:32:17 GMT typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I kept a pair of cheaters in my tool book to go over the bifocals in order to read the mic ...
>BTW I also have one Russian 0-25mm micrometer. It is beefier than > all the others which I have or have used. I think the shaft is > 8mm (about 5/16" instead of the more common 1/4" shaft on the > others. I guess that I would not be too upset at seeing it used > as a C-clamp. :-) > > Enjoy, > DoN.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I kept a pair of cheaters in my tool book to go over the bifocals in order to read the mic ...
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I keep bifocal safety glasses at each machine tool and my electronics work areas.
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I find I need REALLY GOOD light to read analog mics and verniers
Reply to
Clare Snyder
I'd really like a one-dial/two pointers (clock style) analog display on (for instance) a lathe threading operation. Watching to see the numbers flicker and approach zero is perilous when the tool is about to hit the thread's shoulder, I'd really prefer a coarse zero/fine zero dial instead of numeric readout.
Screens are cheap, a readout with both options is kinda trivial in hardware, just takes some software support to get the display to update often enough to be seamless.
Reply to
whit3rd

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