OT: Comparison of Unix systems and window managers



I'm trying to remember how I did it. Had to do with a 6883 SAM and a 74LS138 3-to-8 bit MUX, I seem to recall, but the specifics are lost in the mists of time. But it was 4116's I tore out of CoCo's I had upgraded with 4164's, and the perfboard from Radio Shack and a bunch of spaghetti-wire. It's probably 20 feet from where I am now, I know what shelf it's on. (see previous re: I really need to clean this stuff up)

Well, technically, the star trek game and nethack have _a_ GUI, they're just a text GUI. Damn good gameplay, I still play nethack from time to time.

You know, it's funny. The iPhone games that are coming out are impresive, dozens of KB each. Amazingly compact given today's trends of package size. Warms the heart, it does, to see developers who actually care about memory and optimize their code.

Um, sort of. vold is I think what you're thinking of, it's more or less automountd of times past. But Solaris Volume Manager, derived from Online Disk Suite and it's varients, isn't horrible these days. "Here, mirror this to that and just work please, thank you" seems to work just fine.

Yup. metastat, metadetach, metattach, and friends. These days, doesn't suck. Not sure if I just got more tolerant or smarter over the last 10 years, or if it got non-evil in the meantime. But it's sure better than dealing with Veritas volume manager.

Yup, that's the one. Doesn't suck.

Isn't zfs more about the journaling than raid? Dunno, we're not there yet.

Yeah yeah, you retired guys make me envious. But I'm decades away from it.

Go by color. Sun's packaging folks must be color-blind so if it's fugly, it's worth a second look.

I have to be careful that there is no question about the equipment in my basement having come from my employer. I'm real careful about that -when I built my house, I used square-D circuit breakers rather than GE just so nobody would have any reason to accuse me of stealing stuff out of stock for my house. Same with my cat-5 wiring, we used black at work so I bought blue. And so on. Stories still circulate about the guy who had a racecar, which should have had the number "46" because the part numbers at our part of GE started with the prefix "46-". I don't want to be "that guy".

There's always the windows-emulation stuff for Mac, I guess. Or WINE. Or, boot to windows to do a single task. Or just pay the local guy 100 bux and get on with life, saving all that time and stress. I'm thinking of the latter approach for this year, I don't enjoy doing it.

Oh, hell yes, I always do, Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. I played with Level-I on a CoCo -- just to see how much of a real OS could work on such toy hardware. (It still had the bit-banger serial interface from a few pins of a parallel port chip, which even SWTP had dropped when they went from the 6800 to the 6809. :-) But still, the SWTP 6809 hardware felt a *lot* better in use. (Of course, I had real hard disks on it, unlike the CoCo. :-)

    O.K. I never really spent enough time on NetHack to get hooked, even though I did compile it for the v7 machine.
    The Star Treck I've played in so many versions that they all blur together by now.

    *Real* hackers are coming back. :-)

    O.K. I hit it earlier -- I think on Solaris 8 or Solaris 9, and had too many things go flakey so I never committed to it. It was especially difficult to recover after a system shutdown. (With zfs, I simply do a "zfs export" followed by a "zfs import" if zfs tried to start before all of the disks were spun up and it thus complained about that. And the same sequence will let me move a zfs filesystem from one interface to another -- even with different SCSI IDs in the new location. (I moved one set from a 6-slot Multipack on the 280R's built-in external SCSI interface to a D-1000 connected to a HVD PCI card and I had to do nothing to make it happy other than export and import.
    I also used the export/import sequence to move it from an Ultra-60 to the Sun Fire 280R. Again, no problems.

    *That* I never dealt with. There was someone else who was managing the backups in a rather extensive tape library using the Veritas software for that.
    Personally -- I would worry about trying to recover the license keys after a major crash before I could start to recover the rest of the system.
    I'm using Amanda for my tape library.

    [ ... ]

    O.K. But at this point I am really happy with zfs.

    It does the journaling -- making it recover from unplanned shutdowns more gracefully. But it has two versions of RAID5, which are called raidz and raidz2. The latter does more journaling (so it chews up more disk) but it is still quite good from my point of view.
    Here is the output of "zpool status"
=====================================================================Burke:csu 14:56:20 # zpool status pool: home-p state: ONLINE scrub: none requested config:
NAME STATE READ WRITE CKSUM home-p ONLINE 0 0 0 raidz2 ONLINE 0 0 0 c5t8d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c5t9d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c5t10d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c5t11d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c5t12d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 spares c5t13d0 AVAIL
errors: No known data errors
pool: photo-p state: ONLINE scrub: none requested config:
NAME STATE READ WRITE CKSUM photo-p ONLINE 0 0 0 raidz2 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t0d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t1d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t2d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t3d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t4d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t8d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t9d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 c2t10d0 ONLINE 0 0 0 spares c2t11d0 AVAIL
errors: No known data errors =====================================================================     Two pools -- one formed on the D1000 (home-p), and one formed on a Kingston disk tray with 12 slots for 68-pin drives (photo-p) which is the backup of my photo data.
    And the output from "zfs list" is:
=====================================================================Burke:csu 0:49:26 # zfs list NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT home-p 3.54G 45.7G 49.1K /home-p home-p/home-1 1.86G 45.7G 1.86G /home-p/home-1 home-p/home-4 555M 45.7G 555M /home-p/home-4 home-p/home-6 1.14G 45.7G 1.14G /home-p/home-6 photo-p 37.2G 62.2G 61.7K /photo-p photo-p/DoN.photos 26.3G 62.2G 26.3G /photo-p/DoN.photos photo-p/Dolores.photos 423M 62.2G 423M /photo-p/Dolores.photos photo-p/csu.photos 10.5G 62.2G 10.5G /photo-p/csu.photos ===================================================================== As I have it configured, the various partitions sharing a pool all have access to any as yet unused space in the pool -- though they can be set up with quotas limiting each.
    You can also ask the system to make a static image (a snapshot) of a partition which in reality only stores the changes from the moment the snapshot was taken. As time goes on, it takes more and more space to store the information to get back to the original image -- but you do this for a short while to make backups from a static filesystem, and then destroy the snapshot, releasing what little space it consumed.

    Sorry. I stuck with Uncle Sam (an Army R&D lab) for a long time, and at times the only thing which made it tolerable was that unlike the GIs, I could always quit if I needed to. :-)
    For a lot of that time, I was an electronics technician, and for about the last five years, I was a unix systems admin (a welcome change, because the interesting tasks were by that time being contracted out, so life was rather boring as a technician.)

    They didn't used to be that bad -- just rather bland. The Sun Fire 280R seems to be sneering at me (the swing-aside panel which gives access to the hot-swapable FC-AL drives and one of the two hot-swappable power supplies. :-)

    I can understand that. I used to pick up things at the local DMRO auctions, and made *sure* that I kept my receipts. Later (after I retired), I picked up some things at a hamfest which even had recognizable initials on them -- one of the people who had left the lab some years before, and whose property equipment was passed on from person to person until if finally got turned in by someone tired of having to locate it every six months and account for it. :-)

    There is a version of the tax software which I used for the Mac. It is on the same CD-ROM as the Windows stuff -- and I would be more willing to connect an OS-X system to the net to download the required last-minute updates than I ever would with a Windows 2000 Pro system, which I have never applied the security patches to, because I *never* intend to let it talk to the net. :-)

    We did that for a while, starting after my parents died and the tax forms got really hairy. Then, about the time they settled down, the accountant we were using retired, and left us a name of someone to move to. We opted to go back to doing it ourselves, and a couple of months later, we got a warning from the original accountant that this replacement was not a good choice after all -- so it is just as well that we dropped back to doing it ourselves.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, we had hard drives, eventually. But they were _tiny_ and _huge_.

Oh, yeah, it's basically the basis for most or all of the mmorpg's folks go nuts over these days.

Never left, just hiding.

Hm, we've got over 1000 8 & 9 boxes running it, without problem. Might be a patch issue or, well, someone doing it wrong?

Yeah, I want to play with ZFS but we're not ready to go to it just yet it seems.

RUN AWAY.

Yes, this has prolonged several outages.

Cool. Can I do straight disk mirroring instead of Raid5? (googles) looks like I can. Should play with that in the lab.

Yup. Those drives are a pain to hot-swap though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    Well ... my v7 unix box ran on a pair of 8" Fujitsu M2312K drives (84 MB each) after getting it started on an SA-1004 (I think it was called -- a 10 MB 8" drive which had a control bus like the 8" floppies, plus radial data bus.
    Those drives certainly added heat to the living room -- as well as noise. :-)
    [ ... ]

    Yep! But people are now seeing them again -- or at least their work.

    It well could have been, since I was trying to do it on my own. but zfs was a lot easier for me to get up to speed in.

    O.K.
    If threatened with it, I would. :-)

    That somehow fails to surprise me. :-)

    Yep -- you can. I must admit to being amazed at how fast a five drive raidz2 is compared to a single drive on the Ultra 68-pin bus.

    I know that you have to first get the system to unmount it, then convince it to let go of the WWN and accept the WWN of the replacement drive. But at least I *can* do it while keeping the system running, assuming that it is not supporting a critical filesystem. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's not forget adventure, rogue, and vms-empire. I'm still addicted to empire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks very much for all the thoughtful responses.
First perhaps I should describe my machine in a bit more detail. It's a Sun Ultra 2 with 2 x 400 MHz processors, 1280 MB RAM and 2 x 36 GB hard drives. It's fast enough for almost everything I want to do. The only thing it won't do satisfactorily is play full-screen video, and I rarely want to do that. I've thought about adding more RAM, but as I rarely use all of the 1280 MB, there doesn't seem much point. The first digit of the serial number is 8, so according to what Dave says, it's a 1998 machine. The system board date given by "eeprom" is 36029598, but I can't make much sense of that. But whatever the date, it's one of the highest specification Ultra 2s out there.
Rob, thanks very much for the offer of an Ultra 5 or 10. But I think even the fastest Ultra 5s and 10s are slower for most tasks than a high specification Ultra 2. Plus I'm guessing you're in the US, so the shipping to me in England would probably be exorbitant.
Besides, my Ultra 2 seems fast enough for my needs. I don't really feel I need a faster machine. Even running Gimp under Gnome, it seems fast enough to me. The machine was also plenty fast enough to run Solaris 10 when I tried it. But I really disliked the Java Desktop System, so I went back to Solaris 9.
Choice of window manager is obviously a very personal thing. Don likes window managers which are really simple. Some people like an extreme amount of eye candy. I like a compromise between the two. I really think Microsoft did a great job of designing the windowing system which was used from Windows 95 until Windows 2000 Professional. That's why I like Gnome 2.0.2 with the "Crux" theme.
I guess I could try compiling Gnome 2.0.2 for Solaris 10. And if I was to do that, I'd probably add one or two more features such as "next" and "previous" buttons when using Nautilus as an image viewer (the version of Nautilus which comes with Solaris 10 includes these buttons, but it dumps core when you try to use them, which was another reason why I abandoned Solaris 10). But I've not compiled anything for Solaris before. I've compiled things for HP-UX, but that was a long time ago, and my skills are undoubtedly rusty. Besides, at the moment I'd rather use reliable pre-compiled packages if I can, and spend the time using the packages instead. But the problem is that I'm finding it hard to locate reliable versions of the packages I want for Solaris 9 now. The big problem with the packages from http://www.blastwave.org/ is that they use shared libraries, which forces you to upgrade everything, even if you'd prefer to have the latest versions of some packages, but older versions of others.
Does anyone know of a Gimp 1.2 package for Solaris 9 which doesn't use shared libraries? The only one I can find is on Sun's freeware CD-Rom, but this seems to be an early version which won't save GIF or PNG files.
Don, you mentioned a Gimp 2.0 package which was released by Sun. Do you know if they released a version of this for Solaris 9, and if so where it's available from? I wouldn't object to Gimp 2.0 so much if I could find a version which was reliable and didn't dump core almost every time I used it.
Igor, thanks for suggesting FVWM2. I used to use FVWM on a HP-UX system (not mine) a long time ago and disliked it. It was just too basic for my liking. I didn't realise there was a big difference between FVWM and FVWM2, but having looked at some FVWM2 screenshots, it looks alright. FVWM2 is installing now as I type this. I'll try it out and see what I think. Does FVWM2 support "themes" or "skins" or whatever it chooses to call them? I don't see this as a requirement if the window manager looks sensible to start with, but many don't.
Now I think about it, I seem to remember there being a few other window managers around which duplicated the appearance and functionality of Microsoft Windows. FVWM95 and QVWM I think. Some went a bit too far, even copying the "Start" button. Are any of these still around? I'm happy with the compromise offered by Gnome 2.0.2, but I can't find a package of it for Solaris 10, and I'm not sure how long I'm going to be able to keep using Solaris 9.
I'm not saying there's anything wrong with Linux. I'm just familiar with Unix, and familiarity is good when you don't want to spend time learning something new.
If I was to buy another machine, it would likely be a PC rather than a SPARC machine. Much as I like SPARCs, availability of spares can be a problem, and PC hardware gives more possibilities when experimenting with operating systems. Plus, there are a few things for which I'd find a PC useful, such as Photoshop, QuarkXPress and AutoCAD.
Thanks for the advice.
Best wishes,
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 30 Oct 2007 01:16:00 +0000, Christopher Tidy

Join the club on that regard. Not sure that means anything at all.

Yup, for that architecture, you've pretty much topped it out. Says a lot, actually, that 10 year old hardware of this class is still usable.

Yes, I'd stick with the Ultra-2 over a desktop-class Ultra-5, 10, or 60. Although the 60 is pretty much a toss-up.

I'm SURE you can run gnome on Sol10. I haven't found anything yet that couldn't be migrated, no reason gnome should be unique.

If you have a solaris package for it, just install it on 10 and you'll most likely be fine. And if you're not, I'd love to know. pkginfo |grep -i gnome might list them for you.

sunfreeware.com. Really.

Nothing wrong with working in your comfort zone.
Feel free to email me directly if you want; if time permits I'll be happy to try to help.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Interesting that the system board date is unset in the Ultra-60:
        system-board-date: data not available.
and the variable does not even exist in the Sun Fire 280R. (Nor does anything with the word "date" in it.
    What framebuffer do you have in your Ultra-2? I ran the latest available Creator-3D in it, as I do in my Ultra-60s now.
    O.K. Other than filling out the RAM to the full 2GB. For many things, that does not matter, but if the GIMP is important to you, you want both as much physical RAM, and as much swap space as possible. Note that the GIMP (at least version 2.0.2) can accept a disk partition to use for its own private swap space, and I've given that to mine. IIRC, it asked for it when the version first was started.

    (Maybe) slightly faster CPUs, but only one per system, slower disks (IDE) but you can put in two 120 GB disks for relatively little money. (They can't use larger than something like 137 GB, IIRC -- they'll ignore any extra if you put a larger disk in -- and this is a limitation of the hardware of the disk interface, not the driver in the OS, so you can't fix that. CPU speeds can go up to 440 MHz, and down as far as 270 MHz.
    RAM -- only four DIMMs -- limited to smaller ones for the Ultra-5, even though they both have the same system board -- the problem being clearance for the taller DIMMs under the floppy drive IIRC.
    O.K. DIMMs are either *only* 16MB DIMMs in all occupied slots, or a mix of 32, 64, 128, or 256MB DIMMS (in pairs) in the Ultra-10 , or all but the 256 MB ones in the Ultra-5. You've got a choice of 60nS or 50 nS DIMMS, and if they are mixed, they will all be treated as 60 nS.
    Ultra 5 is stuck with the built-in framebuffer, or a PCI one of appropriate type. Ultra-10 has more room in the case (thus taller DIMMs, and the possibility of a Creator-3D or Elite-3D board in a UPA1 graphics slot.

    Note that even the Ultra-10 is a lot lighter than the Ultra-2. I've lifted enough of both so I can be sure of this. :-) But shipping could *still* be exorbitant. :-)

    Well ... at least add more RAM. Note that the same DIMMs can be used in the Ultra-60 if you opt to upgrade.

    O.K. I've never liked what Windows looked like. I prefer to do most things (other than image processing) from plain xterm or dtterm windows, typing (though cutting and pasting between them at need).

    Remember to strip out all of the existing Gnome packages which install from the DVD-ROM. I believe that you can leave it out totally, but run the pkginfo command to be sure before you start building.

    You can play games with the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable to limit what a process sees.
    But note that you *cannot* build truly static packages with recent versions of Solaris. (I believe that this includes Solaris 9, but I can't check, since my last install of that was updated to Solaris 10 long ago.) The reason? Look for /usr/lib/libc.a. It isn't there. (Now, if you download the sources for Solaris 10, and compile your own, you can build it with /usr/lib/libc.a and then you can compile your own fully static code.)

    I haven't used Solaris 9 for quite a while.

    Well -- the one which I have (2.0.2) was included in the main install DVD-ROM (since it installed in /usr/sfw/bin, not /opt/sfw/bin where the software companion ones wind up).
    And -- it is using shared libs to a large extent. Running:
    ldd `which gimp`
returns 44 shared libs. This is already too large to post properly, so I won't add that -- but if you want it in private e-mail, send me a request. you can check the shared libs to see how many of them can be found in the Solaris 9 system. If you don't hit version limitations, you can put the additional shared libs (from the Solaris 10 distribution DVD) into a private lib directory for the GIMP and can quite possibly run it there.

    Note that fvwm2 is included in the Software Companion DVD-ROM for Solaris 10. It can be found in /opt/sfw/bin, and ldd shows it as using only 17 shared libs most of which are in /usr/openwin/lib and /usr/lib, though there are two platform-specific ones, which on my Ultra-60 are:
/platform/SUNW,Ultra-60/lib/libc_psr.so.1 /platform/SUNW,Ultra-60/lib/libmd5_psr.so.1
In the Sun Fire 280R, instead they are:
/platform/SUNW,Sun-Fire-280R/lib/libc_psr.so.1 /platform/SUNW,Sun-Fire-280R/lib/libmd5_psr.so.1
so you will have to check for corresponding ones in your system for the Ultra-2. These are actually symlinks to the appropriate libs for the CPU. :-)

    Well ... you don't have to build fvwm2 for Solaris 10, as it is in the Software Companion DVD.

    Understood -- though there is enough new to learn with Solaris 10 (such as the replacement of /etc/inetd.conf with "svcs" and "svcadm".

    Spares don't seem to be a problem with eBay selling spare machines dirt cheap. But eBay still leaves you with the shipping across the pond. :-)

    Just keep it clear of the outside net while running Windows. I simply refuse to let my Windows 2000 Pro system touch the outside net, and have to talk to the income tax software people for a way to download the latest update files to my Suns, and then to copy them to the Windows machine.
    Best of luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:
<snip>

I've got the Creator-3D, same as you.

I've never found RAM at an attractive enough price to make it tempting. Because of the modules I've currently got installed, I'd have had to buy a whole 2 GB, and that was about $100, shipping included. And there didn't seem a lot of point, when Solaris Management Console said I was only using half my RAM at the most. I guess I could increase the tile cache size, but Gimp 1.2 seems fast enough. But Gimp 2.0 seems very slow, which is one reason why I dislike it. It also dumps core all the time.
<snip>

I'd probably let it see the net through our ADSL router, but put Windows and Unix on separate hard drives. If Windows gets screwed up, re-install.
Best wishes,
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K.
    ??? -- I thought that you had over 1GB of RAM, which means that at least some of your DIMMs are the maximum size -- probably half of them.
    Hmm ... for that you could possibly get an Ultra-60 *with* 2GB of RAM and the dual 450 MHz CPUs -- though the shipping to the UK might be a killer.
    O.K. One auction (290174751151) is *three* Ultra-60s, but with 360 MHz CPUs, and only 448MB RAM each. The DIMMs are under the power supply shown to the left in the opened view.
    No drives visible, but your two 36 GB drives would fit.
    O.K. This one (250179441529) is the dual 450 MHz CPUs, but only 1GB of RAM. One 36 GB and one 18 GB drive. But it is $349.00 not the $100.00 I suggested. The prices do vary, of course. DVD-ROM drive, but no floppy drive.
    This one (330180925896) is 1GB, 18 GB hard drive (possibly only single) 450 MHz CPU. No DVD-ROM drive -- you would have to transfer the one from your Ultra-2. Currently at $34.95.
    (270179641558) 450 MHz, 512 MB RAM, 36 GB disk, $100.00 (maybe only one CPU, and only one disk. And at 512 MB RAM, you would certainly have to replace all of the RAM to expand it.
    BTW -- you can use the Ultra-2 CPU modules in the Ultra-60 -- that is how similar they are. And the DIMMs are interchangible between the two systems as well.
    However -- the disk cage will accept 1.6" high drives, instead of only the 1" ones which the Ultra-2 limits you to.
    (270181880587) 450 MHz CPUs (maybe only one), 73 GB HD (single drive), 1GB RAM, DVD-ROM (but no floppy).
    While I'm here, my search turned up this, which may be of interest to you: (170164237248)     It is eight DIMMs adding up to 1GB, which would fit your Ultra-2 or the Ultra-60 -- sixteen DIMM sockets in either system. The price? Buy-it-now $18.00 for the set of eight. And, he has ten sets available, so you could get a full 2GB for the worst case situation for $36.00 (plus shipping).
    And this one (280168344128) is the dual 450 MHz, 512 MB of RAM, and (single) 18 GB disk. No DVD-ROM or floppy visible. $95.00 Buy-It-Now.
    And just as a teaser for the Sun Blade 2000:
    (300164734882) dual 900 MHz CPUs, 4GB of RAM, (you would need to change them all to go to the max of 8GB). These are the Cu (copper) CPUs -- faster than the equivalent aluminum conductor ones. And it has two 73 GB Fibre Channel drives in it. This one sort of tempts me. :-) It is currently at $212.50. Hmm -- no DVD drive -- again move from your Ultra-2. (BTW -- you may need to upgrade the firmware in the DVD drive to be able to boot DVDs from it with the Sun Blade 2000. I had to do that with the one from my Ultra-2 which I put in an Ultra-60.
    The small dayglow green circles in one of the photos are the jackscrews for the CPUs, and the larger (but thinner) dayglow green circle below and to the left is the torque wrench shipped with it so you don't over-torque the CPUs.
    Note the serious power supply wires in the next to bottom-most photo. The Sun Fire 280R (same system board and CPUs) has dual hot-swappable power supplies, and dual hot-swapable Fibre Channel drives, but in the 280R they are limited to 1" high like the Ultra-2.

    Did you check it while you had a lot of images open in the GIMP?

    While it does *not* dump core for me under Solaris 10 -- in either the Ultra-60 or the Sun Fire 280R. (It is just *faster* in the 280R. :-)

    O.K. Good luck -- but I would keep the unix and Windows operations on different hardware, just to be sure. :-)

    And to you,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

I've got 4 x 128 MB and 12 x 64 MB modules. So I'd need to replace at least 12, and people seem to sell them in 8s or 16s.

By the time I've paid the shipping and got screwed by the English taxman on importing, I don't think I'll save anything. I tend to only buy from the US if I can't get stuff elsewhere. If I buy from within Europe, I don't have to pay duty. Thanks for the thought, though!
Best wishes,
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... lots of eBay items snipped ... ]

    Hmm ... can't you limit your eBay searches to the UK locations?
    And I sometimes see people offering things in the UK in the usenet newsgroup comp.sys.sun.hardware, which would get you things already past the taxman's barrier.
FWIW    The Sun Blade 2000 which I pointed out closed at $300.00. It     makes me wish that *I* had bid on it. :-) (Of course, no clue     how high the actual top bid of the winner was -- but the fact     that it closed at precisely $300.00 suggests that was his real     top bid.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

Hey, DoN. I've got a couple of SB-1000 you can have. But, I'll want to drop them off at a UPS store and have them boxed up and shipped on your nickle. Zero hassle for me and you pay the full freight on them. Otherwise, they're free..
(I've shifted over to using SunRays and have no further need for individual workstations.)
If interested, let me know and I'll forward detailed descriptions..
--
HZ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    That sounds great to me.
    The e-mail above is valid, as is the e-mail in my .sig (the same).
    Please don't use HTML (not that I would expect it from a Sun user. :-) But if you do, it is likely to automatically wind up in the spam folder and I'll have to spot it.

    Great!
    I am. Though if you are in South Africa or someplace lik that, the shipping could be a killer. :-)
    Thanks,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just tried FVWM2 from http://www.blastwave.org /. Version 2.4.19. It took me an hour or so to set the window manager up and make it appear on the "dtlogin" screen, but now it works.
It's actually very much like the FVWM that I remember on HP-UX. A bit too simplistic for my liking. I much prefer the Windows method of minimising and maximising windows which Gnome offers. I also miss the Gnome "Applications" menu at the top of the screen, and FVWM2 doesn't seem to like Firefox, which I use as my main browser (it keeps hanging).
Looks like I'm going to be sticking with Solaris 9. I might buy a PC for experimentation, though. I've seen some nice rackmount machines for sale. I like those rackmount cases because they don't go yellow with age.
Thanks for the advice.
Best wishes,
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can do that with fvwm2 and more.
See
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/screenshot-fvwm2-00.png

You can have all that run along with fvwm2. See the above screenshot.

Used PCs cost next to nothing around here.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus10340 wrote:

That doesn't look at all like the version of FVWM2 I installed, and at a quick look, I couldn't find any option in the menus for customising its appearance.
You make a lot from Google AdSense :-).
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You do so by editing .fvwm2rc. I can help and there are tons of examples floating around.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus10340 wrote:

Aargh. That looks like a lot of work!
I guess this is perhaps where I'm not quite a Unix purist. I like ease of configuration offered by a GUI sometimes :-).
I might try configuring FVWM2 another night, but not tonight. I'll get back to you if I need any help.
Best wishes,
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then you could check out fvwm-themes.

It is good, I stuck with the same config for 12 years, with some changes, but not much. Used themes at some oipnt and also tried gnome-wm.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.