OT: respect for fallen vets

We attended a funeral today. Good friend's dad, who was a vet. Not a military funeral, but there was an American Legion honor guard at
the cemetary. John had been an active Legionaire. It was a bit raggedy, but done by volunteers with the best of respectful intents on a winter Saturday.
It reminded me of an experience I've never forgotten:
--
I once was assigned to run a military graveside ceremony while on
active duty. This was a week after my Dad's funeral. I asked the
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Don Foreman wrote:

Thanks for that, I found it quite moving. Don
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You are a man of fine mettle!
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You might find these interesting: http://xeml.buglesacrossamerica.org / http://operationtaps.org/Index.html
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Don Foreman wrote:

Moving story , thanks Don . When Dad died , I kept my shit together until the CO of the local reserve artillery unit (HS classmate) handed me and my brothers each a polished case that was used in the salute . I still lose it when I think about that .
--
Snag



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wrote:

Funny you should mention that. I have a handful of .30-06 shell casings (the Legionaires used M-1's) in my brass-polishing tumbler running right now for my friend and her family. The lead Legionaire had policed up the brass and quietly offered it to her, I told her I'd be happy to polish them if she'd like. After consulting with other family members, they decided that they'd like that. Done deal.
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Great one, Don. Many thanks. I am forwarding it to my retired Army Col. friend.
Bob Swinney
We attended a funeral today. Good friend's dad, who was a vet. Not a military funeral, but there was an American Legion honor guard at the cemetary. John had been an active Legionaire. It was a bit raggedy, but done by volunteers with the best of respectful intents on a winter Saturday.
It reminded me of an experience I've never forgotten:
--
I once was assigned to run a military graveside ceremony while on
active duty. This was a week after my Dad's funeral. I asked the
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Thank you for sharing that. Obviously your captain chose the right man for the job. Though never in the military myself, I find the dignity and precision of a well executed ceremony very moving.
Too bad all our vets aren't treated with the same respect you and your men showed.
Jon
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Thank you, Don. I've been to too many myself.
I have a friend, Canadian, who just returned from Afganistan.
She sent me this link just this morning...
If I die before you wake... http://www.andiesisle.com/ifidiebeforeyouwake.html
--

Richard Lamb
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb /
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Love him or loathe him, he nailed this one right on the head..........
By Rush Limbaugh:
I think the vast differences in compensation between victims of the September 11 casualty and those who die serving our country in Uniform are profound. No one is really talking about it either, because you just don't criticize anything having to do with September 11.
Well, I can't let the numbers pass by because it says something really disturbing about the entitlement mentality of this country. If you lost a family member in the September 11 attack, you're going to get an average of $1,185,000. The range is a minimum guarantee of $250,000, all the way up to $4.7 million..
If you are a surviving family member of an American soldier killed in action, the first check you get is a $6,000 direct death benefit, half of which is taxable.
Next, you get $1,750 for burial costs. If you are the surviving spouse, you get $833 a month until you remarry. And there's a payment of $211 per month for each child under 18. When the child hits 18, those payments come to a screeching halt.
Keep in mind that some of the people who are getting an average of $1.185 million up to $4.7 million are complaining that it's not enough. Their deaths were tragic, but for most, they were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.
Soldiers put themselves in harms way FOR ALL OF US, and they and their families know the dangers.. (Actually, soldiers are put in harms way by politicians and commanding officers.)
We also learned over the weekend that some of the victims from the Oklahoma City bombing have started an organization asking for the same deal that the September 11 families are getting. In addition to that, some of the families of those bombed in the embassies are now asking for compensation as well.
You see where this is going, don't you? Folks, this is part and parcel of over 50 years of entitlement politics in this country. It's just really sad. Every time a pay raise comes up for the military, they usually receive next to nothing of a raise. Now the green machine is in combat in the Middle East while their families have to survive on food stamps and live in low-rent housing. Make sense?
However, our own US Congress voted themselves a raise. Many of you don't know that they only have to be in Congress one time to receive a pension that is more than $15,000 per month. And most are now equal to being millionaires plus. They do not receive Social Security on retirement because they didn't have to pay into the system. If some of the military people stay in for 20 years and get out as an E-7, they may receive a pension of $1,000 per month, and the very people who placed them in harm's way receives a pension of $15,000 per month.
I would like to see our elected officials pick up a weapon and join ranks before they start cutting out benefits and lowering pay for our sons and daughters who are now fighting.
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Thanks for sharing your story. The respect is what matters.
Thank you for serving,
Wes
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.> TMT
If you want peace, work to end envy.
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Good on you.
Tom Dacon
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On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 16:28:58 -0800 (PST), Too_Many_Tools

None of us? Veterans know that war kills people. It's not an abstraction or fodder for rhetoric for vets. Some of the people killed were buddies and teammates.
Peace is far more preferable to war than anyone who has not waged war can comprehend.
But tyrants and governments out of control also kill people, e.g. the holocaust. Our freedom was won by a revolutionary war, and unfortunately it must be occasionally defended by war, or clear willingness and ability to successfully wage war, against agressors.
Our elected leaders, politicians, decide when to wage war. Pols of both parties have abused that like they've abused almost everything and everyone in the past few decades. That's our system. It has worked well in the past but not since 'Nam. I think the problem is that Americans became complacent after WW II and the great depression. The generation that prospered after the depression and WW II is now departing or gone and the following generations they spoiled hoping to give them a better life have created a culture of perceived entitlement, and acceptance and even boastful celebration of greed.
The challenge we have before us is to find and elect good leaders regardless of party who will actually function as leaders for the good of the realm and the people of the realm, while maintaining sufficient strength to defend us against aggressors with such military action as may be required.
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Don Foreman wrote:

Besides, for warriors, it's the only game worth playing.
--

Richard Lamb
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb /
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wrote:

Well ya, there is that. <G>
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That's why the Constitution puts an elected civilian at the head of the military. Fires are the only game for firemen, crimes for policemen and illness for doctors. We need them but we can't have them stirring up work for themselves either.
Former General Eisenhower worked very hard to keep the peace by containing the threats. He cut the ground forces to the bone and sent the U-2 over Russia to disprove the bomber gap allegation his generals were using to boost spending. Khrushchev, who had been through the horrible battle of Stalingrad, had the same problem with his "metal eaters": http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,870800-3,00.html
Don't ever forget that Kennedy, Johnson and the Democrats bear the blame for Vietnam. Ike kept the US presence there so limited and covert that you have to know the veterans involved to hear about it.
The recipe for world peace is simple, everyone must follow orders and be satisfied with no more than they actually need, IOW learn to live like a soldier. Strive for that, sucker, be an example yourself.
jsw
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Please do me a great favor. NEVER EVER refer to "us" in your future writings. It assumes that you and I are somehow in the same group and share the same philosophies. You do not think or speak for me. Any time you do, you have my permission to shoot me.
HTH, but I doubt it.
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Don Foreman wrote:

Good job Don.
I buried Dad last New years Eve, with military honors. He was a D-Day veteran and retired Air Force NCO It was bitterly cold, and those young Air Force enlisted men were shivering in their uniforms. But they performed flawlessly, and all were moved by the service.
Thank you for your service to our country, and to our deceased veterans
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I'm going to jump in here. I served in peace time, yup, 1975-79 was peaceful. Got to put that disclamer in.
The survivors are both the family and those that are part of the honoring ceremony. Both love the departed soldier citizen.
Wes
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