OT: The new Durflame "logs"

Wife brings home a carton of Duraflame "logs" for the fireplace. Here in
south Florida you want a cozy fire about two nights per year, and storing
real firewood invites termites, so we put up with this faux fire. Now these
log things always used to smell OK, being sawdust and petroleum wax. But
now they say, "NEW! All Natural Ingredients".
After shelving the new inventory, the room stinks strongly, strongly of
STALE HOT DOG WATER like you're at a ball game or something.
A little MSDS research discloses they are now made of sawdust and a
"proprietary blend of fatty acids".
This info and the odor suggests to me that these things are now made from
sawdust soaked with animal grease kept on the brink of rancidity with
nitrates.
Ugggh!
Like Uncle Al sez, "environmentalism: expensive, shoddy, deadly".
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
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Screw the termites; now you will attract all kinds of hungry vermin, insect, animal, human, etc. JR Dweller in the cellar
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Reply to
JR North
Where we come from (canada), wood heating is normal. I'll suggest storing "real" hard wood in totes outside with a few moth-balls...1 tote per night, and a bit of kindling in the tote to get you going. Ken
Reply to
Ken S. Tucker
Coal
Reply to
Dirk Bruere at NeoPax
In article , "Ken S. Tucker" wrote:
If you get seasoned oak, it is too hard for termites.
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/ ** Posted from
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Reply to
nick hull
You just get borers and powderpost beetles, instead...
How about a gas log?
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
glyford
You may have mentioned your location before, but I never took notice. Looks like I drive within a mile of your place twice a year. (I google mapped you from the TrueTex web site) Do you like visitors? If you want, I'll bring a couple sticks of red oak so you can see what real men burn.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
disgusting, unless it's a hotdog.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
More than termites is critters. We'd be at 0F and cart in a few totes, and after some time notice a few bugs flying around that came out of hibernation. Ken
Reply to
Ken S. Tucker
I wonder how many homeowners will come home to find a pile of chewed-up "logs" and a sick dog....
Reply to
Jim Stewart
Don't burn the Soylent Brown!!! It's made from people!!! Peeeooppllleee!!!!
I suppose PETA will have to get involved.
I wonder what kind of smog is produced by burning animal fat as opposed to just using pine cones and newspaper as tinder
Reply to
Stupendous Man
Here is what the Duraflame people responded:
"We are sorry to learn that you have been noticing an unpleasant or strange odor from our product. As you may know, over the last year we modified the formulation of our products to discontinue the use of petroleum wax in favor of more environmentally friendly wax materials that are derived from plant and vegetable oils, and are therefore more sustainable. In the past the petroleum based waxes we used in our products produced a mild chemical smell when burning. The new non-petroleum waxes we now use produce an odor more similar to wood while burning, but the unburned logs may emanate a slight smell of an industrial cleaner, like pine, or a burned fat / grease type of smell. This is caused by the new ingredients which utilize derivatives of pine oils and vegetable fats. While our new formulation logs may have a different scent than what you were accustomed to with our prior product the odor should not be strong or unpleasant."
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Dear Richard J Kinch:
Probably needs a dry air purge to keep them from being "sustained" during storage.
"We haven't done sustained testing in different environments, and it smells fine at our factory befor the biology sets in."
Let's make fireplace logs soaked in mustard... that way together they will smell fine. ;>)
I'd recommend you wrap them and freeze them upon purchase.
David A. Smith
Reply to
dlzc
LOL, Mr. Kinch is in Florida, do coconuts burn well? Really there should be something indigenous. Ken
Reply to
Ken S. Tucker
Canada has a very large area of forests for its population. It would be economically foolish to not use many trees for heating. About the CO2 I leave that for the environuts to argue otherwise. FK
Reply to
Fred Kasner
Dear Ken S. Tucker:
Alligators. Swamp water. Lots of sunshine. Always a hurricane to worry about. Tourists. Snow birds. Retired welders, etc. Ex-Disney, etc. employees. Lush vegetation that is flammable during drought, but smells like crap (like the well water) when drying.
I never saw a coconut tree in Florida.
Seriously, freeze it, or keep it in an environment that lowers the humidity to 10%RH or less.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
Ever think about cutting, splitting and stacking firewood rather than buying it as a packaged mass-market commodity?
Reply to
Don Foreman
HaHa
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
messagenews: snipped-for-privacy@f40g2000pri.googlegroups.com...
Well I must be a coconut magnet..."cocobunked"...
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vaguely recall inlaws house in Florida sprouting coconuts, Clearwater. Ken
Reply to
Ken S. Tucker
Yes, and have done so. As I explained before, it is a serious termite hazard in this sub-tropical part of the country.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch

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