Recount day

We recounted about 12,000 votes from 30 precincts yesterday. We had two
teams of three and each team had an auditor to supervise. The procedure was
to sort the votes from one precinct into piles, one sorting two watching.
Then count the R votes by another judge while the other two watched. Then
judge three counted the D votes while the other two watched. Finally the
sort judge counted the other votes pile while other two watched. Then the
auditor compared all totals to known values for election day. If there were
any discrepancies we found the reason.
First, comments on the voting equipment. Out of all the votes, I seen two
that the machine didn't count that a human would. On one vote, the person
had made a check by the dem., wrote NO and then filled in the box for the
independent. On the second, an extremely dirty person had voted Rep.; the
machine thought the heavy smudges was an over vote. The equipment was able
to count circled names, checks for votes, light pencil marks, etc. Truly
amazing. (It also showed me that we have way too few idiots here in rural
MN, we need to import some kalifornians)
Now, of course, observers were present. Eight workers in the room and an
average of 15 -20 observers. We began the day by listening to objections by
the lawyer from one group. The county attorney was called to receive the
objections and decide.
We then started. Yours truly was first sorting judge. Big mistake. I was
immediately sited for not calling out the vote on each ballot. Again, all
the attorneys did their thing and the ruling was this is not necessary.
Started again, and very quickly your truly was sited for speeding. I slowed
down, the objection was renewed. So, I ignored this one. Guess what, we got
all the attorneys together and got a ruling on the appropriate speed. Also a
ruling that the crowd could only talk to the auditor not the judges
directly.
OK, we started at 0800, and we finally got going good at 1000. Then this
same side starts objecting to individual votes. Coffee stains, circle not
filled in completely, stray marks on the ballot, checks for candidate, dirt
on ballot, on and on. Frivolous stuff in my view.
By the end of the day it had become obvious (to me) that this group had a
hidden agenda. they had objected to almost exactly 5% of the votes, all for
the other candidate. These votes are not part of the official count for the
day, they go to the state canvassing board for review before reporting. The
media will only get to see the official count for the day and now it has
been distorted. So, it will look like their candidate is the winner for now.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Whoops, that's 0.5% (60 out of 12000).
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Which other candidate?
CarlBoyd
Reply to
Carl
I'll only give you a clue. The problem folks are Cliff's freinds.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
The entitlement party will do anything to get elected, so that they can force their obviously enlightned perspective on the rest of us peasants, who are fortunate that the educated elite are there to tell us the proper way to exist.
It sounds like a grueling experience you went through, but as an American I owe you gratitude for not only being there, but for documenting your experience. Regular folks don't often have such an opportunity to find out about such things, which is part of the problem as well; sunshine really is the best disinfectant.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Looking at it statewide, as of the end of the day Thursday, Coleman had challenged 360 votes, Franken 372, according to the Secretary of State.
A difference of 12 votes. So perhaps your experience is a bit skewed to one side.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Coleman has tried to get the recount stopped three times, even though it's mandated under state law. And the number of challenges is 360 for Coleman as of the end of the day yesterday; 372 for Franken.
It turns out that the Coleman campaign can't remember who received the phone call about the 32 votes that were "in a car." Even in court yesterday. They just seem to have forgotten...
You may want to keep your powder dry until this is all over.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
----------------- I really expected a bigger turn out, say 150,000,000 for Franken and 150,000,001 for Coleman.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
...
I just heard the disputed ballot count is now about 1000. So, it does sound like the experience at my site was the exception, not the rule. Thank goodness.
I talked to the county auditor about this. The media had it all wrong. The auditor's office delivers absentee ballots to the individual precinct captains the day before the election. In this case, the two missed connection so the ballots were kept in a sealed envelope over night. SOP. They were delivered late on election day. NOT the day after. A retraction on this was made by the media, but of course it didn't get national attention.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Fox News has quite a different account. They're the ones who reported on the "lost" ballots -- three times.
Here's their latest account of the incident:
"According to Fritz Knaak, senior counsel for the Coleman campaign, around 8 p.m. Nov. 7, Coleman's campaign received a phone call from Reichert informing the campaign that 32 absentee ballots had been found in her car. Knaak told FOXNews.com that Reichert said those ballots would be counted the next day. "'She initiated the call. She said, 'There were some ballots in the back of my car,'" Knaak said.
"Knaak added that he did not speak with Reichert directly, saying the elections director talked with a Coleman campaign staff member. 'I think someone on our legal staff,' Knaak said, though he declined to provide a name.
"The following morning, Knaak appeared in a Ramsey County courtroom to request a temporary restraining order to stop the counting of the 32 ballots.
"Ramsey County Chief Judge Kathleen Gearin -- now a member of the Minnesota State Canvassing Board in charge of ruling over disputed ballots in the Senate race recount -- rejected Knaak's request."
So the claim, according to Fox, was made by Coleman's senior counsel. But he was reporting what someone else on the Coleman campaign said to him. He "thinks" is was someone on Coleman's legal staff.
Coleman's request was not just to challenge the 32 votes, but to shut down all vote recounting throughout the state. Franken's attorney was given one hour's notice of the court hearing.
It wasn't "the media" that retracted the claim. It was Fritz Knaak. And as for national attention, it's being reported in news accounts all over the US.
You might want to check the county auditor's account, Karl. It doesn't agree with anything being said anywhere in the news, nor is it what Coleman's attorney said about it.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Hey, Karl, take care of your eyes! You only get one set:
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(Associated Press) "In Meeker County, an election judge was worried about his vision after four straight hours of staring at ballots. 'My eyes are starting to kill me ... my eyes are really giving me trouble now,' said Karl Townsend, according to a story in the West Central Tribune."
(Here's the original story in the WCTrib):
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There's your 15 seconds of fame. You have 14 min., 45 sec. left. Use them wisely. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Thank you again for your service. Keep the commentary going. Nice to get the word from someone other than the drive by media.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Hey, now I'm a movie star. Watch the replay on channel 2 Twin Cities tommorrow night. I'm the old fat bald guy judge. Should be easy to spot.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I was on TV today also, there goes another 15 seconds. There will be a replay tomorrow, 15 more. But I bet you already forgot about the gun threat at our annual meeting, so my time must be used up.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Who did you threaten?
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 19:29:26 -0500, the infamous "Ed Huntress" scrawled the following:
OK, Karl. Now that you've got the clap, what are you going to do?
-- Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired. -- Jules Renard
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 15:49:17 -0600, the infamous F. George McDuffee scrawled the following:
"Who'd ya vote for, SNL or the other guy?"
Only in America...
-- Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired. -- Jules Renard
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 19:58:20 -0600, the infamous "Karl Townsend" scrawled the following:
If the glare didn't blind the camera, eh, Karl?
-- Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired. -- Jules Renard
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Hey, we're talking about Minnesota here. This is the state that had a pro wrestler for governor, so comedians are right up their alley.
Their next Attorney General will be a retired clown from Barnum & Bailey. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 22:39:39 -0500, the infamous "Ed Huntress" scrawled the following:
Unk sed:
Hey, I heard that Jesse Ventura was a good governor and was well liked. Don't be dissin' de Body.
Good, he'd be no 2nd Amendment stealing wonk, would he?
[high-speed topic change]
For some fun, put on a new Depends, go to
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, go to the Kindle Store, and click on the Kindle Books tab. Sort that page by Price, Hight to Low, and fill your Depends. Don't they say "most titles Under $10"? Prepare to be surprised.
-- Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired. -- Jules Renard
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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