Spraying used oil

I need to spray used oil on a number of truck frames etc.
I would like to know what is a good solution, preferably compressor
driven, that would make a good spray pattern and preferably not too
much overspray.
I am not interested in opinions about advantages and disadvantages of
used oil spraying, I just want to know how to spray it.
Thanks
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3828
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Ignoramus3828 fired this volley in news:At6dnYpDrLM8BG3LnZ2dnUU7-a snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Find an old DeVilbiss (or other brand) air-powered "airless" sprayer. I have one for painting. It is a superior sprayer of paint, even of high- viscosity. I have absolutely NO doubt it would spray motor oil equally as well.
It looks like a 'paint canister' of the sort for air-spraying, except with a piston mechanism on top to do the pressurization of the fluid, rather than relying only on air pressure. Like motorized airless sprayers, it can produce many hundreds of pounds of fluid pressure, instead of being limited only to the pressure your air supply can produce.
And they spray very cleanly. I've painted many tens of thousands of square feet of farm buildings with one I bought for $50 at a welfare store.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I had a pressure feed paint gun with a 1 gallon tank that we used to oil-spray the bottom of our vehicles with used airplane engine oil. Properly adjusted it laid the oil on without too much "fogging". Putting it on warm helped
Reply to
clare
Why airplane oil?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Cheap HVLP gun will work for straight filtered oil.
Or filter it, add it to a turkey fryer and toss a few toilet seal rings (beeswax) in. Then use an undercoat gun and wands to get into all the spots. The wax will set up and hold the oil in place. Close to the Bar&Chain oil and wax mix that I and a bunch of others use.
Either way wear a GOOD respirator. Breathing in an oil mist will not make you healthy !!!!
Reply to
Steve W.
They are softer than paraffin wax and don't crack as much in cold weather. I brush melted toilet bowl wax onto the ends of cut logs to reduce splitting as they dry and shrink.
The MSDS data suggests that Thompson's Water Seal and LPS-3 have had their active preservatives removed and are now just wax in solvent.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
What were these additives?
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Tom Gardner on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 02:13:18 -0400 typed
It is what he has? -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I don't remember exactly and I'm keeping my computer clean by not searching while doing my taxes. You could look.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
There is a type of atomizer that forces air out of a slot cut into a hollow sphere. The oil is then pumped so that it flows over the sphere and the slot. This allows the use of unfiltered oil. Eric
Reply to
etpm
This is second-hand info, but I remember from discussions a decade ago with some woodworkers...
The old formula was just some volatile solvent and some kind of wax -- not common paraffin, according to reports, but some similar hydrocarbon wax. The new formula is water-based. It still contains some volatiles, but it doesn't spread well and it doesn't soak in as well.
The old formula is still sold in some states. For years, when I wanted a paint with high VOC, I drove from NJ over to PA and bought it there. That's how I got my last (current) can of Thompson's Water Seal, around 5 years ago.
If you're in a state where you can still buy it, the can looks the same but the original formula says of the VOCs, "600 g/L." The newer stuff is much less -- something like 1/.3 as much. It's also yellowish and thicker than the old water-clear formula.
I helped my neighbor paint our dividing fence with the new stuff. It's OK, but it's a little yucky and tacky.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
IIRC you're talking about a Babington burner
Reply to
David Billington
Because we had about 30 gallons of it at the hangar from changing the oil on the planes over the last year or two.
Reply to
clare
I've done this before. I used an empty carbon dioxide fire extinguisher. I soldered a garden sprayer nozzle into the output tube and a Schrader valve into a hole in the brass neck. Unscrew the whole top, fill to about 2/3 wit h oil and then reassemble and charge with air to 8 or 10 bar using a compre ssor. It works well. I might have a picture of it somewhere.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Amazon reviews of Thompsons 10104 MultiSurface Water Seal Waterproofer new formula show 4 positive reviews, and 24 critical (1 star of 5) reviews ... amazingly negative, overall.
Reply to
James Waldby
Besides it probably being illegal in Illinoise and salt/water/dust would likely quickly erase it from the frame, MOST people use a rubberized undercoating for frames and underbodies, Ig. Why not recycle the oil and steamclean + undercoat your trucks, for a once-in-a-lifetime fix?
Otherwise, what about using an existing aerator spray tip and adjusting the air pressure to control the overspray? Olive oil can be sprayed with a hand-pump and regular paint spray can nozzle. Grab a magnifying glass and look at pressure washer or paint gun tips for clues into spray containment. It's possible that an HVLP paint sprayer might work, so you might give that a try, too.
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I dislike the oil spray concept from an eco standpoint, and I'm surprised it isn't illegal. Where's the freakin' EPA now? Watch them fine a person $50k for leaking a quart of oil onto the ground, but they let 1,000,000 people leak oil onto the street and flow into lakes and sewer systems? Go figure!
Reply to
Larry Jaques
LIGHTER, of course, Tawm.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Rubberized undercoating guarantees the vehicle WILL rust as soon as ithe rubber film is damaged - and it WILL be damaged.
Reply to
clare
Hmmm. That's exactly what we encountered, except that it did eventually dry.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
A little update.
I bought a Harbor Freight "engine cleaning gun" 68290, which siphons liquid and sprays it with assistance of air.
I hooked it up to a pressurized stainless tank so that oil is pressure fed into the gun (at a small pressure).
The result seems to be pretty good, a decent amount of oil sprayed without too much atomization.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus9970

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