Spraying used oil



They are softer than paraffin wax and don't crack as much in cold weather. I brush melted toilet bowl wax onto the ends of cut logs to reduce splitting as they dry and shrink.
The MSDS data suggests that Thompson's Water Seal and LPS-3 have had their active preservatives removed and are now just wax in solvent.
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What were these additives?
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I don't remember exactly and I'm keeping my computer clean by not searching while doing my taxes. You could look.
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On Tue, 22 Mar 2016 12:09:07 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

This is second-hand info, but I remember from discussions a decade ago with some woodworkers...
The old formula was just some volatile solvent and some kind of wax -- not common paraffin, according to reports, but some similar hydrocarbon wax. The new formula is water-based. It still contains some volatiles, but it doesn't spread well and it doesn't soak in as well.
The old formula is still sold in some states. For years, when I wanted a paint with high VOC, I drove from NJ over to PA and bought it there. That's how I got my last (current) can of Thompson's Water Seal, around 5 years ago.
If you're in a state where you can still buy it, the can looks the same but the original formula says of the VOCs, "600 g/L." The newer stuff is much less -- something like 1/.3 as much. It's also yellowish and thicker than the old water-clear formula.
I helped my neighbor paint our dividing fence with the new stuff. It's OK, but it's a little yucky and tacky.
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On Tue, 22 Mar 2016 12:28:46 -0400, Ed Huntress wrote:

...

Amazon reviews of Thompsons 10104 MultiSurface Water Seal Waterproofer new formula show 4 positive reviews, and 24 critical (1 star of 5) reviews ... amazingly negative, overall. <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> > The old formula is still sold in some states. For years, when I wanted

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On Wed, 23 Mar 2016 21:57:12 -0000 (UTC), James Waldby

Hmmm. That's exactly what we encountered, except that it did eventually dry.
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Really amazingly negative reviews! i
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2016 09:23:15 -0500, Ignoramus9970

AFAIC, Thompsons should be sued for saying that ANY of their products work...at all.
I'm surprised that _silicone_ hasn't sued them for slander.
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wrote:

If the oil used was BLO, I can see why it worked.
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wrote:

When you run out, switch to Penofin Blue. It's the cheaper one and works better than their premium product. Penofin works better than any other finish I've ever tried, and I've tried a lot in this business. Penofin builds, so you put it on this year, next year, two years after that, 3-5 years after that, etc. Truly great stuff. I've done log homes with it and the owners were ecstatic with its look and performance.
Brush in deck cleaner, rinse, allow to dry for a week, sweep off, and apply in the morning sun, before it gets too hot. Let it sit and wipe off any excess. That's a hassle, but it wipes easily and dries hard. Lay the wipe cloth out flat on the grass to dry completely or it might self-combust.
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On 3/22/2016 11:40 AM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Airplane oil
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 20:02:25 -0500, Ignoramus3828

There is a type of atomizer that forces air out of a slot cut into a hollow sphere. The oil is then pumped so that it flows over the sphere and the slot. This allows the use of unfiltered oil. Eric
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On 22/03/16 16:17, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

IIRC you're talking about a Babington burner
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I've done this before. I used an empty carbon dioxide fire extinguisher. I soldered a garden sprayer nozzle into the output tube and a Schrader valve into a hole in the brass neck. Unscrew the whole top, fill to about 2/3 wit h oil and then reassemble and charge with air to 8 or 10 bar using a compre ssor. It works well. I might have a picture of it somewhere.
Chris
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That would be fun if somebody used it to put out a fire.
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I've got a small throw away ABC powder extinguisher that's creeping to the low side of green on the pressure guage. Tryin to think of fun re-uses for it once I finally drain the thing for practice and get a new one.
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 20:02:25 -0500, Ignoramus3828

Besides it probably being illegal in Illinoise and salt/water/dust would likely quickly erase it from the frame, MOST people use a rubberized undercoating for frames and underbodies, Ig. Why not recycle the oil and steamclean + undercoat your trucks, for a once-in-a-lifetime fix?
Otherwise, what about using an existing aerator spray tip and adjusting the air pressure to control the overspray? Olive oil can be sprayed with a hand-pump and regular paint spray can nozzle. Grab a magnifying glass and look at pressure washer or paint gun tips for clues into spray containment. It's possible that an HVLP paint sprayer might work, so you might give that a try, too. http://tinyurl.com/3muqz79
I dislike the oil spray concept from an eco standpoint, and I'm surprised it isn't illegal. Where's the freakin' EPA now? Watch them fine a person $50k for leaking a quart of oil onto the ground, but they let 1,000,000 people leak oil onto the street and flow into lakes and sewer systems? Go figure!
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2016 16:21:11 -0700, Larry Jaques

Rubberized undercoating guarantees the vehicle WILL rust as soon as ithe rubber film is damaged - and it WILL be damaged.
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2016 23:37:59 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

So if the protectant is damaged, it will rust? Who would have ever guessed that? <thud>
So, what do you like? Do you prefer cathodic protection? Blue glitter wands? What? ;)
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 21:13:59 -0700, Larry Jaques

I much prefer a "self healing" protection - like a waxy oil. A mix a friend of mine uses is a mix of a vegetable oil, beeswax and lanolin.- applied warm.
The old Waxoyl product worked pretty good. Krown rustproofing is good. So is RustChek
My 20 year old Ford is virtually rust free - treated with RustChek
As far as the cathodic protection, what you are buying is an insurance policy and a little box of snake oil.
A friend's 2007 GMC pickup has had aver $5000 worth of bodywork done under the rust protection warranty. His car, which also has one, has had over $3000 worth of rust repair done (I think it's a 2005 Chev)
My 2002 Taurus, treated with Waxoyl from new and Krowned twice, has has no rust repair, and has no rust showing and my 96 Ranger has had one tiny spot repaired on the left rear fender - a spot the size of a quarter.
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