W D 40

I've seen quite a few posts about w d 40 here, both pro and con. I've got a
grandfather clock I built 23 years ago and it's never had any lube except
wd40. I spray a little in once a year and so far o k.
Any comments?
Walt
Reply to
E. Walter Le Roy
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Don't know about WD40 but a capful of kerosene in the base of the clock seems a popular method as well.
Shawn
Reply to
Shawn
Bad idea. WD40 dries up, turns into sticky glue. Attracts dust, makes thicker, harder goo. More WD can wash away some of it, but you need more each time. This exacerbates the problem, covering all the surfaces in muck.
Clocks need to be lubricated *only* at the pivot points. Meshing gears are designed to run dry. Oil on the face of gear does no good.
Proper lubrication involves:
1) removal of all the previous attempts to lubricate (95% of the time expended on the task) 2) application, by the drop, of clock oil to the pivots (only) (2% of the time) 3) cleanup of any spilt oil (3% of the time)
WD *can* work to unseize a dirty clock - but the fix is only temporary.
-- Jeff R.
Reply to
Jeff R.
I want to know what was wrong with the first 39 "Water Displacement" formulas!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
yep thats what my dad did and I think my grandad. ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
They didn't smell "nice"
Reply to
Boris Mohar
Years ago, I worked for Simplex Time Recorder when most of the time clocks were mechanical. More than a few times we had a call to check out a clock loosing time. On inspection, we found the shaft holes in the backplate worn one diameter wide and two d's long. Needless to say, the gears didn't line up so well any more. The story was always "Well, about three months ago, the clock started squeaking so I gave it a couple of shots of WD-40 and it quieted down." The factory grease spots on the shafts would be washed away by the '40 so the plate began to wear. The WD-40 actually lubed the synchronous motor (which was bad) for a bit till everything went south. It is basically a solvent with TEMPorary lubricating abilities. Respectfully, Ron Moore
Reply to
Ron Moore
It gets sticky.
WD-40 is good for softening up dried WD-40 deposits.
It can be good for cleaning grease off your hands. I prefer Go-jo but some times you have to improvise.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
YOu worked for Simplex? I stuck up/repaired a shitload of Simplex clocks and various syncronizers when I worked for Cincinnati Time.
Hated working on the big assed motor generators..was always afraid of getting my ass fried.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Reply to
Gunner
I only had one of those installations, a college campus. I sure jumped the first time I heard it kick off and do its thing, 3510htz as I remember. You could hear that thing all over campus. We mostly used the tube-type transmitters. I think I've still got one, somewhere. Ron
Reply to
Ron Moore
You can use Brownpolymer instead of WD-40 it doesn't harden with age it can be put on wet or dry film stays on for ever. WD-40 was made for water displacement not for lubing. Brownpolymer has to be wiped on as its pressure activated. The only bad point it won't wash of with any solvent but turpentine. Rand
Reply to
brownie
wd 40 information may be of use
Water Displacement #40.
The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts.
WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a "water displacement" compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.
The workers were so pleased with the product, they began smuggling (also known as "shrinkage" or "stealing") it out to use at home. The executives decided there might be a consumer market for it and put it in aerosol cans. The rest, as they say, is history.
It is a carefully guarded recipe known only to four people. Only one of them is the "brew master." There are about 2.5 million gallons of the stuff manufactured each year. It gets its distinctive smell from a fragrance that is added to the brew.
Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothin in WD-40 that would hurt you.
When you read the "shower door" part, try it. It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass. It's a miracle!
Then try it on your stovetop...Voila! It's now shinier than it's ever been.
You'll be amazed.
Here are some of the uses:
Protects silver from tarnishing.
Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery.
Keeps flies off cows.
Restores and cleans chalkboards.
Removes lipstick stains.
Loosens stubborn zippers.
Untangles jewelry chains.
Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.
Removes tomato stains from clothing.
Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
Keeps scissors working smoothly.
Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.
Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers.
Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.
Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
Removes splattered grease on stove.
Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
Removes all traces of duct tape.
Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
Florida's favorite use is: "cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers."
The favorite use in the state of New York--WD-40 protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
Reply to
brian c

Also..
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Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Tom Gardner wrote in article ...
....or what greatness we may have missed by stopping at WD-40 and not pursuing to WD-41.....
Reply to
*
still would use Brownpolymer its not toxic has no flash point will go to higher temp won't carbonize plus it will go to lower with out any change. it's being used for on silver to keep from tarnishing . using on drills and saw for drilling gold. Can be used on machine ways and tooling coolant Once put on stays wont wipe off doesn't wear off keeps alum from tarnishing and prevents acid from attacking the surface. Zebra mussel can't stick to the surface that it's applied on. Also can be used for waterless car wash a wax a cleaner can be put Shower wall to keep soup scum from sticking Water runs off Dirt won't stick repels Dirt Works on metal tools and keeps them from rusting Brass and copper stop corrosion can be used for anti fouling on boats Work in low temp Works on fishing reels Not effected by solvents or water doesn't wash off can be used for metal spinning can be used for stick draw slide and windows work excellent on all bearings and bushings Great cleaner when wiped on will clean your hands like waterless cleaner Got to try it found at
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Depends very little on petroleum made mostly from organic compoundsI
Reply to
brownie
Ive still got a couple boxes of synchronous motor cores, some clock works and whatnot. And a dozen or so time clocks, mostly Cincy..but probably a couple Simplex and whatnot.
I was Responsible Managing Employee for a franchise here in Califronia..had to have all the licenses for the fire alarm stuff. Shrug. Thats what I was doing just before I went into machine tool repair. Access controls, fire alarms, time and attendence stuff. Ran 3 brance offices. Bakersfield, Visalia and Fresno.
Hated the little bastard who owned the franchise. When I got the job with OmniTurn..I came in early, cleaned out my desk and work areas, cleaned my personal stuff from the company truck, and left the keys on his desk, laying on a photo copy of my hand, bird finger extended.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Reply to
Gunner
Thanks - good stuff. flash point at 130 F! Gunner doesn't keep one under the bench I bet!
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Spehro Pefhany wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
What, an open container of WD-40? Crom's dick..NO.
In fact..I just got to thinking..and I dont believe Ive got any WD40 anywhere on the property. I dont use it, dont like it, got better alternatives so dont waste my money on it.
Gunner
> >Martin >Martin H. Eastburn >@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net >TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. >NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder >IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. >
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> > >Spehro Pefhany wrote: >> >> >> >>>wd 40 information may be of use >> >> >> >> >> Also.. >> >>
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>> >> >> >> Best regards, >> Spehro Pefhany > >
Reply to
Gunner
The 30-35% "Petroleum Base Oil" in the composition seems yo contradict those who keep saying WD-40 has no lubricating properties, doesn't it?
I'd expect that the oil is left after the other stuff evaporates, huh?
If not, why not?
Jeff
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
n fact..I just got to thinking..and I dont believe Ive got any WD40
You and me both...
Erik
Reply to
Erik

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