Whait is it? XLVII

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Rob
Reply to
R.H.
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260. Round tenon cutter, as for chair framing. 261. Embossing stamp, as once commonly used by notaries. 262. Brick mason's jointing tool, for tooling mortar joints. 263. Snake bite kit. 264. Masonry nail. 265. Lathe cutting tool holder.
Something's wrong. These were too easy.
Dale Scroggins
Reply to
Dale Scroggins
* R. H.
260. A tool to uncover some heavy gates, e.g. a man hole cover.
261. Seal tool: Put an envelope with melted seal stuff inside and bang on the handle.
262. A tree craftman tool? E.g. for carving. (I don't think so, because it does not look sharp.) 263. Glue repair set.
264. A nail used to tight some bolt with tracks by banging it in.
265. Tool to unscrew difficult bolts.
Reply to
Jon Haugsand
261 looks like something you would use to make badges
Reply to
Jonathan Wilson
260
261 company seal press ( indents paper)
262 chemistry spatcular (is that spelt correctly?)
263 emergency kit for ??? boat/sail repair
Reply to
Matthew Newell
260: some kind of quarter-turn fastener?
261: this device embosses a seal/stamp on paper documents, a notary public or town clerk would use it for the "official seal"
262: a mason's tuck pointing trowel, used to shape mortar joints between bricks or blocks
263: first aid kit for venomous snake bites
264: a nail for fastening things (e.g. wood) to concrete
265: lathe parting tool bit holder
Reply to
Ron DeBlock
261. Notary "press" or whatever they are called...
262. Bricklayers / Mason's "pointing" tool for the joints between bricks, etc.
263. Snake Bite Kit
264. Masonry nail
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022
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Reply to
Joe AutoDrill
260. Looks like a Brace driven tennon cutter. 261. A Stamp press to emboss paper. 262. Mortar tool for shaping mortar between bricks. 263. Snake bite kit. 264. Masonry Nail
Reply to
Leon
260 Whait , I've seen something like that before. ;o/
261 Notary stamp that is used on documents that are never looked at.
262 Jointer for masonry. I've got a better one that is drop forged and is S shaped. That kind suck.
263 Repair kit for my computer.
264 That is a make sure you have your glasses on and willing to have whole or parts flying at high speed at you things. I prefer the 2" fluted concrete nails and they don't make them like they use to ! It's amazing how long it takes some to land. Sound kinda like ricocheted bullets when the heads come off and hit you inside your nostril.
265 One of those things that I've yet to get. I'm curious how that would work in a planer. Do the blades fly apart when they fail or crashed ?
Reply to
Sunworshipper
#261 - For embossing the owners name on the page of a book. #262 - For smoothing the morter between blocks or bricks. #263 - Snakebite kit. #264 - Masonary nail.
scott
Reply to
Scott Lurndal
* snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net
If this is correct, you Americans (and Australians) have an edge over us Europeans. Snake bites are not uncommon, but I have never heard of such kits and I don't think that our kind of venomous snake bites can be healed by such kits. (There is this story of an American tourist in Norway who slept out in Oslo during a hot summer day. Suddenly he woke discovering a snake on his body. His shock scared the snake who stroke and bit the tourist. Being an enlightened American, he immediately tried to catch the snake so that the first aid team could invoke correct treatment given what kind of poison this particular snake used. A short fight followed during which our tourist was bit by the snake once more. But he managed to kill it, took it with him and called for help. Down at the hospital (with pains) he showed the snake. Startled nurses and doctors stared at the snake. He explained, but got the answer "We have only one venomous serpent in Norway, the viper." (Anyway, painful as its poison is, it is not deadly.))
Anyway, why the small knife?
Reply to
Jon Haugsand
The small knife is for cutting open the wounds made by the snake so that they will flow blood, and venom with it, more easily. The snake bit kits today are made from rubber and are made to be used as suction devices to get the venom out. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
The string restricts blood flow. The knife to open the bite holes ( cut with the grain!) The rubber cups to suck out the poison. I forget what the liquid is, maybe antiseptic??
Modern version:
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Reply to
Mark and Kim Smith
To cut between the punctures before sucking the poison out. Some of the kits had an outer rubber case which could double as a suction device, but the Mark I mouth was generally more effective. Just make sure and spit it out. Of course, this was pre-HIV, you'll get a mouthful of blood too.
scott
Reply to
Scott Lurndal
Nope
Correct, it's an embosser, but not for anything offficial
These four are all correct.
Reply to
R.H.
"Joe AutoDrill" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@individual.net...
You've got the right idea, but it's not for a notary.
These three are correct.
Reply to
R.H.
It's a cutter, but according to the seller it's not for tennons.
All of these are correct.
Reply to
R.H.
260. No clue 261. Notary public stamp 262. Brick mortar jointer 263. An old snake bite kit. 264. Masonry or concrete nail. 265. Lathe cut-off tool holder.
Reply to
Gary Brady
Snip
Startled nurses and doctors stared at the
We have many snakes that will kill you and so do the gents down under. You can tell by looking at how the skin is "woven" at the bottom side of the tail as to whether it is posionouds or not.
Poisonous snakes skin scales on the bottom side of the tail are in a Single row and their eye pupils are eliptical. Non poisonous snakes skin scakes on the bottom side of the tail are in a Double row and the eye pupils are round.
Here are some that are found in Texas.
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IIRC to open the wound. And, that is not necessirally the best way to treat a bite these days.
Reply to
Leon
* Scott Lurndal
Thanks to you, Mark and Kim. This reminds of the probably well-known story, offensive perhaps, so rot13 :-) :
Gur gjb thlf jrag bhg svfuvat naq qevaxvat orref. Orvat fbzrjung qehax bar bs gurz unq gb crr, ohg fgnaqvat gurer jvgu uvf ... guvat bhgfvqr ur ybfg onynapr naq sryy. Bs pbhefr gurer jnf n fanxr, uvtuyl cbvfbabhf, gung fgebxr naq ovg uvz, lrf lbh thrffrq vg, whfg ba uvf ... guvat. Uvf fpernz nggenpgrq uvf sevraq'f nggragvba naq ur pnzr ehaavat naq fbba haqrefgbbq gur fvghngvba. Ur erpbtavmrq gur fanxr, ohg hapregnva jung gb qb, ur ena onpx gb gur pnzc, sbhaq uvf pryy cubar, qvnyrq 911, tbg pbagnpg naq rkcynvarq gur fvghngvba. "Nj," jnf gur nafjre, "lbh zhfg vzzrqvngryl eha onpx gb lbhe sevraq naq fhpx gur cbvfba bhg. Lbh unir gb qb vg sbe ng yrnfg unys na ubhe gb or fher!" "Be ryfr?" nfxrq bhe thl. Gur nafjre jnf "be ryfr lbhe sevraq jvyy qvr jvgu vaperqvoyr, ybatynfgvat naq haornenoyr cnva." Bhe thl oebxr gur pbaarpgvba naq jrag onpx gb uvf hayhpxl sevraq. "Jung qvq gurl fnl?" ur nfxrq. "Jryy," gur thl fnvq, "Lbh jvyy qvr jvgu vaperqvoyr, ybatynfgvat naq haornenoyr cnva."
Reply to
Jon Haugsand

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