What is it? LXXII

Another set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com/
Rob

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R.H. wrote:

From rec.woodworking
#412: It's on the tip of my brain, I know I've seen that before somewhere. #413: That's a wire grip. You'd love to see the ones I used to use when building 500kv lines! #414: Dunno #415: Looks like an old ball joint separator #416: Tubing bender #417: Piston ring groove cleaner
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413 - Part of a wire strainer kit 416 - copper tube bending spring
and that's burnt me out.
JB
--
After several glasses of cheap red, imabrowneye was heard to mention
that....
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R.H. wrote:

412. Block for attaching a mason's line to corners. 413. Identified by previous posters. 414. Laser level, missing the level? 415. Valve spring compressor for side-valve engine? 416 and 417. Identified by previous posters.
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#413: For lifting/handling sheet metal #414: A homebrewn laser level. But damnit, I really don't know what pieces of scrap you've put together for whatever one time job. :-) #415: Autsch! my balls! #417: Scriber with dull edge?
Nick
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Motormodelle / Engine Models:
<http://www.motor-manufaktur.de>
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I've been trying to post one non-tool photo each week, but it's getting harder and harder to find something good for each set. I've got enough tools to last a little while but I have to scrounge every week for a decent close-up or other non-hardware pieces.
Rob
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Astonishing enough, someone has solved it. Well, I'm gonna ignore the obious unobious things and stop complaining. :-))
Nick
--
Motormodelle / Engine Models:
<http://www.motor-manufaktur.de>
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412: Piece of wood.
413: Pipe wrench / grip / lifting tool / etc.
414: Binder clips, rubber bands and a laser light...
415: Torture device?
416: "spring" from a "don't open too far" door device / door stop.
417: Corner line scribe (non-techical name?)
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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412 is a Mason's story-line cleat. Used for stretching a line from one end of a wall to the other for establishing the next course's height.

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R.H. wrote:

414: SuperMaul, with laser sight. It is missing its projectile, a pencil. http://www.officeguns.com/gunadv_super_maul.html
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#412: Mason line holder #413: Cable or wire gripper - often used to stretch barb wire #414: Laser, rubber bands and a bunch of paper clips with the silver handles removed? #415: Valve spring compressor #416: Tubing bender #417: Piston groove cleaner
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Are you shure about that? I can't quite imagin how it serves the job. Is it for automobile usege?
Nick
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Motormodelle / Engine Models:
<http://www.motor-manufaktur.de>
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wrote:

It compresses the valve springs on flathead engines.
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Peter DiVergilio
Most of the money I've wasted was mostly spent trying to impress people who
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Oh, a hammer would do that too! This tool is so dammned crude, that it might work for a huge engine. But no one having a bit of brain would work on a 4-stroke with that thing.
Let's take a closer look at it: - teeth on the outside: Would anybody like to ruin the surface with them? Do you want to wedge it between the spring and the case? And if, it's quite a stupid way to go. - teet again: If it is to compress (and it only can compress something), what are the teeth good for? - The slot. Well, a valve stem would go in there, but could you reach the keys that hold the valve spring retainer? Think about where the retainer contacts the tool. Not a good contact surface _and_ it _must_ be parallel, or the retainer will tilt and lock on the stem.
All the valve-spring compressors I have seen look more like a C-clamp with _parallel_ surfaces.
I really can't believe that.
Nick
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<http://www.motor-manufaktur.de>
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wrote:

On Straight-six engines, where access is through a removable plate, it's the easiest tool to use which will not bend things out of whack. Sorry if I haven't explained it so you can visualize what I mean!!
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Peter DiVergilio
Most of the money I've wasted was mostly spent trying to impress people who
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I've been looking at old plans of automobile engines of that time, with flat head (hanging valves; if you also use this expression). I think we are talking about the same type of construction.
And here comes the point where things get at least strange: - Hold the tool so, that the lower fork touches the spring retainer from the underside. That's OK. Now (practically, the other way round is/was better) you have to force and wag the upper fork between spring (under tension!) and valve head. - Do you think that this is an intelligent way if you consider what for the spring is compressed. Yes, to remove the valve. Now we do have to look way back to the early days of 4 strokes and see how valves were inserted. In T-heads (a sub kind of flat heads) there was a big plug opposide of the valve throug what the valve could be pulled out without removing the head. Now wouldn't it be much cleverer to open that plug and use a C-clamp spring compressor? If you talk about flatheads without that plug, things don't change, because the head is removed and you can easily use the C-clamp compressor.

Hope you could visualize what I meant. :-)
I'd also like to know where your knowledge is from that this tools is for compressing automobile valve springs.
Nick
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Nick Mller wrote:

No. The tool is not intended to compress the valve spring, but merely HOLD it in the compressed position. The valve cover on the side of the block is removed. A valve is selected that is already open, with the spring compressed. The tool is adjusted to slide around the lifter, between the spring retainer and the block, below the valve. Then the camshaft is rotated to lower the lifter. The keepers are removed from the valve stem, and the valve removed from the block. Then on to the next valve.

It is much easier to use the camshaft lobe to compress the spring. The tool merely keeps the spring compressed as the camshaft is rotated further to allow valve keeper removal.

Valve servicing was often done with the engine in place, with manifolds and other equipment still installed. The smaller tool was much less clumsy.

Many small gasoline engines still used the side-valve design here in the US.
Dale Scroggins
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Dale Scroggins wrote:

Slight flaw in your reasoning, Dale, if it isn't used for compressing the spring, how does one replace the valve & keepers? All the ones I use are fully capable of compressing the springs.
Tom
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Tom wrote:

While this tool would be capable of compressing the springs for valve installation, I seldom used one on installation. It's easier for me to compress the spring in a small vise, "mouse" the spring with a couple of pieces of safety wire, install the spring, valves, and keepers, then cut and remove the safety wire. The keepers are much easier to install with no tool in the way, and everything is much easier to align.
My comments weren't based on reasoning or theory, but experience. The technique I described isn't the only way to remove the valves using the tool. It is, in my experience, the fastest way to remove side valves. When customers were paying by the hour, fast was good.
Dale Scroggins
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Dale Scroggins wrote:

Why would you wish to remove the springs if you are only grinding the valves?
Tom
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