What is it? Set 134

"R.H." writes:

783. Fire extinguisher mount.
785. Crane hook for grappling small logs.
--
Mark Brader "The great strength of the totalitarian state
Toronto is that it will force those who fear it
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    As usual -- posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
780)    An inexpensive splicer for standard 1/4" magnetic recording     tape. There are much better splicing blocks (or used to be),     but this is what you would probably get the first time around.
    This one was intended to be used with the 1/2" wide splicing     tape, at right angles to the recording tape.
    The "Cut" position of the sliding head put a cut like this ''     through both layers of the overlapping tape ends, after which     you lifted off the top stub, and applied the splicing tape     (opalescent white and thin) at right angles to the length of the     tape.
    Then, you slid the head to the "trim" position, where it applied     two curved blades to trim the edges of the tape like this:
    | |     ) (     | |
    to trim off the splicing tape which hangs over the sides and a     little of the edges of the tape itself. This makes sure that     the splice is not too wide to go through the guides on the tape     recorder/player.
    The good splicing blocks have no side trimming, the cuts are     done with a hand-held single-edge razor blade, and the splicing     tape applied is either slightly less than 1/4" wide, applied     along the length, or has a backing which peels off after the     splice is made to assure that the spliced tape is not too wide.
781)    I can only guess here -- perhaps used for sifting clams out of     bottom muck?
782)    Again, I've never seen anything like this, so I am limited to     guesses. Perhaps to pull two board ends tight together prior to     nailing down?
783)    This looks like a tripod mount for a telephoto lens for a     serious camera. Some telephotos have a built-in tripod     mount, others have removable ones -- or even after-market ones     from other makers.
    The knob also allows it to be loosened so you can rotate the     camera body for either portrait or landscape mode at need.
784)    Hmm ... part of an early combination lock? Normally, the     rotating discs with the holes would be behind knobs (which could     be fitted with pins in any of the holes to offset the actual     combination from the visible one on the knob, unless the numbers     visible through the aperture were not covered by the knobs.
785)    Some form of grappling hook. I think for picking up groups     of sticks. The horizontal curved bar at the bottom holds the     jaws open until it is dropped onto the potential load, at which     point it is kicked out.
    Once that happens, the load itself (and the weight of the hook)     closes the jaws.
    I'm not sure what the notches just above the pivots (on the     "ears" engage -- though there might be a pin on the back of the     center upright, which would require the jaws to be fully opened     to nearly horizontal.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

780. Magnetic recording tape splicer (tape was used in a reel-to-reel recorder) 781. Pooper-picker-upper. A manure shovel. The manure stays in the shovel, the bedding falls through the gaps in the wires. 782. Toenail clipper. Have you seen my toenails? Nuf said. 783. Camera or binocular adapter, so it can be held on a tripod. 784. Early mechanical calculator. 785. Either an ice or hey bale grapple.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
#780 is some sort of splicing machine #783 looks like a tripod mount for a large telephoto lense. I'd guess a 500-800 mm lense. #785 looks like a log skid or some sort of grappel hook. When you pull up on the lifting ring with a crane or hoist, it clamps down. Or at least that's what it looks like
WW88
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
785: Godzilla's staple remover
--julie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

784. This is obviously a ball/strike counter, or "clicker", for umpires in cricket games. They get 100 balls and 10 strikes - that's why the games take so long.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

My guesses: #781 looks like the thing my Grandad used to move hot coals around in his forge. #782 I have no idea #783 looks a lot like the thing I have to hold my Dremel Mototool stationary. #784 No Idea #785 Looks like the big ice tongs we used to move ice around in the Cold Storage plant I worked at during my College years.
Dennis
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 08:29:31 GMT, "R.H."

781 - A couple of possibilities here, but looking at the leading edge it wouldn't last very long scraping up stuff. So I'll guess it was an Ice Sieve. Used to keep the channel open from chips/debris while cutting/harvesting ice.
785 - Really intrigued me with its diminutive size, so I mucked around till I found the most likely patent number. I think it is 435,590 "Grappling Hook". It was claimed to be used for retrieving objects from water wells. i.e. dippers, buckets, anything that had been dropped in that would stop the well from functioning properly. See:
http://www.pat2pdf.org/patents/pat435590.pdf
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It does work in a similar manner, maybe the same person got a couple of patents on the same day for two different hooks or he got this patent and then modified the tool and kept the same date. I'm guessing that the one on my site isn't spring loaded, but I'll ask the owner of it, though he's out of town for a couple of days so it will be a while until I get an answer. Thanks for finding that.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 20:07:10 GMT, "R.H."

Hi Rob,
I'm no expert, but most patents are for a method coupled with a design. If you take the time to read the description (it isn't very long) you will see towards the end that it mentions:
"My grab or device is to be constructed of several different sizes to suit wells of different bores or diameter."
I've noticed other patents that end up looking different once being manufactured. The way they work though is the same.
With this thing only being 12 inches tall I seriously doubt it was ever used to lift poles or logs as has been suggested. It simply would not be heavy/strong enough to do that. Shoot you could easily have it sitting on the supper table as a center/conversation piece. I don't think people have noticed it isn't very big...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 13:20:59 -0400, Leon Fisk

Hi Rob,
After studying the answer extra images, I think that there may have been a spring at one time. I think it would have been a pull spring (can't think of the proper term) with this design though, rather than the original compression spring shown on the suggested patent page.
Take a look at my doctored image where I highlighted in yellow where I suspect a spring should go:
http://www.iserv.net/~lfisk/grpsprng.jpg
I would be curious to know approximately how much this thing weighs too, when you get a chance to ask more about it.
I did some more patent searching and was surprised with how many "grapple" devices there were for fishing out items from wells. The aforementioned patent is the only one even close to resembling the item in question though. At least that I've found...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

and
one on

out
answer.
You could be right about the spring, there has to be a reason for those notches to be there.

I'll ask the owner of it how much it weighs. FWIW I changed the post on the answer page, I agree that it's most likely for wells, considering its size and the fact that no one has found a patent with the same date for a log grabber.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just added a photo that shows where Gary placed a spring, same as in your picture:
http://pzphotosan134-5.blogspot.com/
It weighs 2 pounds 15 ounces, and considering that it opens to a maximum of 6", I think the well hook answer is correct.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 02 Oct 2006 22:29:49 GMT, "R.H."

Hi Rob,
Thanks for the follow up.
I'm pretty sure you're on the right track. I didn't really think it looked to be heavy-duty enough to be lifting anything much. It even weighs less than I would have hazard guessing...
If the patent date is truly accurate, I'm pretty sure the one I linked to before would be the most likely candidate. I searched through that date pretty well via hit-and-miss and classes (classes are the best way to search, but take the most homework to figure out).
It sure would be nice to have the original instructions that must have went with this item. I think there must have been something (another string or rope) that attached to the sliding wedge at the top too.
Did the owner happen to comment on how/where they got it from? No biggy, just curious. That might shed some more light on the matter.
As others have commented, Thanks a lot for putting all your work into this "puzzle" every week :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

your

of

He got it from a garage sale a little north of Dallas, and since the inventor lived in Arkansas, this is another indication that it's most likely a well hook.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    Agreed.
    I did -- which is why I did not suggest it was for serious log or telephone pole manipulation. It would suffice for fireplace logs, but would probably be overkill for the purpose -- unless they were at the bottom of a pit and otherwise difficult to access.
    I like the "recover things from wells" description.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on
It's clearly missing its spring which would locate in the notches either side of the top of the arms. -- Dave Baker www.pumaracing.co.uk "Why," said Ford squatting down beside him and shivering, "are you lying face down in the dust?" "It's a very effective way of being wretched," said Marvin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Five of the six have been answered correctly this week, still not sure about the last one:
780. Audio tape splicer
781. Coal shovel
782. Carpet stretcher
783. Camera lens tripod collar
784. Adding machine
785. I was all set to agree with those who say it's a log grabber, but I also think that the well grappling hook idea has merit, considering the small size of it.
Several new photos and links can be found on the answer page, along with one additional link concerning my latest gadget purchase:
http://pzphotosan134-5.blogspot.com/
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
785 may be a grappling hook for logs, but I respectfully suggest it isn't for use in inaccessible places... Suppose you drop it down a well, or into a river or lake, and it grabs something you can't lift... then what?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then you need part 'B' of the same patent. A grappling device which is used to snag and unlock part 'A' grappling hooks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.