What is it? Set 378

I just heard back from the owner of it and they said that "the dark surface is just aged brass patina".
I'm not convinced that it's a bluing pan, though I think that someone made it for heating something. It's probably a one off, and if that's the case then it's almost impossible to guess the exact purpose that the person had in mind.
Rob
You don't use blueing solutions in a blueing pan. You fill the cavity with brass filings, and heat blue the part over an alcohol lamp. The brass filings make even contact with the steel part (like a watch hand) being blued. Am I the only one here that has done it?
Steve R.
Reply to
Steve
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I thought it looked small compared to this one that I found on the web:
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But I guess size isn't really an issue since most watch parts would fit into the one on my site.
Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
For watchmakers' workpieces -- things like hands (hour, minute, second hands), which is what is normally blued -- and perhaps screws.
Should not be. More likely the color from repeated heating.
Bluing of watch and clock hands is not chemical-based. The metal is polished (probably spring steel), then heated *evenly* to get just the right thickness of oxidizing (sort of like when tempering hardened spring or tool steel, and judging the hardness by the color.
Normal for a watchmaker. I don't think that I have ever seen a timepiece with Phillips screws. (Nor Allen, nor hex head FTM.)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
That one looks a reasonable size for mantle clock hands. Not quite big enough to handle tall clock (grandfather clock) hands, but sufficient for most mantle clocks, I believe.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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