Couple of Beaver mills for sale

Amongst other things. 10"x56" tables. One with slotter head and variable speed. no bids yet:-
http://www.goindustry.com/en/auctions/equipment-formerly-used-in-the-business-of-dolgarrog-aluminium-ltd/turret-milling-machine-equipmentdetails-1421569.asp

Mark Rand RTFM
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"Method Statement and Risk assessment will be required for removal"
LOL!
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk http://www.oldengine.co.uk
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wrote:

It's upsetting that safety paranoia has got to the point that one is orders of magnitude more likely to get injured or killed on the way to work than at work. A sense of proportion is always useful in life.
Mark Rand RTFM
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On Wed, 06 Aug 2008 22:16:09 +0100, Mark Rand

There's on on Ebay at the moment looking at bit sad. I was slighly tempted but the 56" table makes it hog the floor space somewhat - aside from the issue of moving it (and not really needing it)
Charles
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On or around Wed, 06 Aug 2008 22:16:09 +0100, Mark Rand

yeah, I saw that.
Mind, that's a fascinating site. I see you can buy a complete halogen light bulb manufacturing facility from Kuala Lumpur.
--
Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
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On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 09:42:04 +0100, Austin Shackles

I've bought stuff through them without any drama. You've just got to be careful of the 'Premium'.... 15%+VAT -> about 35% on top of the hammer price which makes quite a difference.
Richard
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Peter A Forbes wrote:

I never thought I would stand up and defend H&S but here goes!
I'd hazard a guess that auction houses dealing in machinery and running sales open to Joe Public must have seen all manner of nutters turning up to shift things that they have purchased using all manner of inappropriate methods to do it.
A group of people not so far from me who should have known better needed to move a Bridgeport mill with varispeed head. They managed to get it onto a trolley - couple of pieces of inch ply screwed together with 3 inch castors fixed on the bottom. All went well, they got the mill out of the building. Then someone had the brilliant idea of attaching a tow rope and pulling it (slowly) with a car. All went well until they tried to turn a corner with it - not sure exactly what went wrong or where the rope was attached but the net result was that the Bridgeport ended up falling from the trolley and converting itself from a well looked after milling machine in excellent condition to a pile of scrap only fit for breaking up for spares. It seems that no one had fully appreciated just how top heavy a Bridgeport is :o(
Also saw two so called fitters, who definitely should have known better, lift an old Colchester Student - one of the old dark green ones, again in good nick and more accurate than some of the other lathes around the workshop. The method they chose to shift the lathe did not involve screwing an eye into the tapped hole provided by the manufacturer - too lazy to look for the eye. So they had an excellent idea they put a piece of large diameter bar into the chuck and wrapped a sling around it . Lifted the lathe with the forklift, one of them ddriving the forklift and the other hanging off the end of the lathe to keep it level in transit. The lathe was duly moved and installed into its new position. The first person to use the lathe in earnest noted that the headstock didn't appear to be running true - basically it was totally knackered. Next time we had a service engineer out for one of the other machine tools he checked it over and it was a write off, beyond economic repair.
Both examples resulted in no one being injured but that was more luck than judgement, but did cause thousands of pounds worth of damage.
I can't help thinking this is a rich vein just waiting to be mined!
So gentlemen lets be having your tales of despair at the stupidity of others!
Oh yes and I once saw a bloke driving fairly slowly around Leicester city centre with an 8x4 sheet of chipboard on the roof of his car - only thing was that he didn't appear to have anything more substantial than bits of baler twine all tied together (a horse owner I'd guess!) passed over the sheet and through the car windows. Not loads of baler twine you understand just two lengths one through the front windows and one through the rear! he wasn't using a roof rack and the car had no roof rails. The sheet was straight onto the car roof, there didn't even appear to be an old blanket or a flattened cardboard box between the sheet and the roof. However, it would appeat that he was concerned about safety and security as for addeded security he had his right arm out of the drivers window and was holding the edge of the sheet, doing his best to keep it steady on the roof! I was sorely tempted to follow and watch the resulting shenanigans but had to elsewhere and with no time to spare :o(
regards
Dudley
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Quite so, but they should also be aware that they can stop people loading anything in a dangerous or unsafe manner. They have a responsiblity (while rarely acknowledging the fact) to ensure the safe carriage of goods that they sell, as they are the ONLY source of loading at the venue.
We have always moved stuff on our 4-wheel trailer with decent rachet straps etc etc., but I will agree on some of the horror stories, especially at engine sales and rally auctions.
Peter Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@prepair.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk http://www.prepair.eu
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