OT, Where did they go?

I recognise that this is somewhat off topic, but does anyone know
where there may be a timeline that shows all of the Aircraft
Manufacturers that were around at the end of WWII and where they went.
Like company XYZ merged with ABC to become XYC, then to buy company
AAC to become XAC. I saw one somewhere years ago but alot has changed
since then. Like Boeing buying McDonnel Douglas. Just thought it would
be interesting to see.
Mike
Reply to
MQM-107
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Actually would be interesting to start just before WW II. Not sure how long companies like Brewster actually lasted. Did they survive the war. Especially with most of the shop in the Bund.
Anyway there was a merger chart in Time or Newsweek when the real industry merger craze was starting. Maybe about 10 or 11 years ago.
Maybe with enough inputs we can construct one. Gotta be messy when companies merged and then they spun off parts to other companies. Need a product line dimension and spin -off.
Look at Grumman - at one time there were aircraft carriers with only Grumman planes on the deck. They merge with Northrop. Now Northrop Grumman is the only company building Carriers - and just parts of carrier aircraft.
Val Kraut
Reply to
Val Kraut
The best I could find was a web site listing aircraft manufacturers in alphabetical order with links to company historoes. Site seems to be a work in progress as some histories aren't done yet. Interesting if you have a specific company in mind - example Brewster life-span was 1932~1942.
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Reply to
Charles Seyferlich
One that would interest me would delieate how all the British manufacturers ended up in BAe except Westlands (or did they?). The French manufacturers also all seem to have grouped up and disappeared behind acronyms.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
Bloch was a French Jew hidden by a Catholic family at mortal risk to their lives.
After the war Bloch changed his name to that of the family who saved him, slightly changing it to Dassault.
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72
One of the more interesting to me is Curtiss-Wright. They went from being the dominant company in US aviation in the early thirties to a manufacturer of subassemblies and parts, and ground equipment, in the jet age. What a comedown. Last time I looked they were still in business, but a mere shadow of their earlier existence.
MQM-107 wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer
That's an easy one - it was the same as Britain's car industry. Correct me if I'm wrong, you Brits, but IIRC, the govenment in power at the time - mid 50s/early 60s? - (probably Labour - they seem to be the bas****s of the piece!) saw that the industry was ailing and instead of doing the smart thing and encouraging each maker to compete with the others, as well as overseas manufacturers, took the political decision to merge all the makers into one - BAe in the case of the aero industry (it wasn't called that originally, I think, but it is now!) and British Leyland for cars. The result - complete loss of anything resembling pride, achievment or product development - with a very few notable exceptions. It's probably a little more complicated than that, but you get the gist.
RobG
Reply to
Rob Grinberg
I think that was from not being able to develop the P-40 farther (though it did indirectly lead to the P-51) and problems with the Helldiver and Curtiss-built P-47s.
Reply to
EGMcCann
Try doing it this way (I did it myself a few years ago). Go to your local library and look up the "Jane's" series of aircraft books. In addition to having a wealth of data on some really obscure modeling subjects, they always had a brief write-up on the (then) current status of the different manufacturers.
Tell me about it. C-W and Consolidated were both located in Buffalo; C-W's factory (one of threee or so that I know of) by the Buffalo Airport was sold to Westinghouse and torn down last year. Consolidated's was to to a tin can manufacturer and somebody else has it now.
-- John The history of things that didn't happen has never been written. . - - - Henry Kissinger
Reply to
The Old Timer
Beg, borrow, steal or get from your lending library a copy of "Project Cancelled" by Derek Wood. Appendix 1 is exactly what you want to see, (well, starting from 1946) and Appendix 2 is the equivalent for engine manufacturers.
To summarise, missing out some details: AV Roe, Hawker, Airspeed, De Havilland, General Aircraft, Blackbur and Folland became Hawker Siddley in 1959-60. Gloster merged with Armstrong-Whitworth who were assimilated by HS.
Bristol, English Electric, Percival and Vickers Armstrong became BAC in 1960.
HS, BAC and Scottish Aviation became BAe in 1977.
Westland, Cierva, Saunders-Roe, Bristol (helo bits) and Fairey became Westlands in 1959-60.
Auster became Beagle in 1962 and closed in 1970 Miles shut down in 1947 Handley Page was liquidated in 1970 Bolton Paul stopped aircraft design in the '50's and became part of Dowty in 1961.
Reply to
Alan Dicey
FWIW I read an article by Donovan Berlin (designer of the Curtiss P-36/P-40 series) and he attributed their decline to "Corporate Senility". Essentially, times changed and Curtiss' management didn't.
Bill Shuey
EGMcCann wrote:
Reply to
William H. Shuey
Yep, IIRC, d'assault was his resistance name. I was thinking along the lines of Nord, Sud-Ouest, SNECMA, etc.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
But their engine division tanked too. They did make jet engines after war, but that division tanked like their airframe business.
EGMcCann wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer
Curtiss-Wright did a job on Studebaker-Packard too back in the late '50s. They had a King-Midas-in-reverse touch after the P-40.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
They also picked up a license for the Wankel engine, but didn't do anything much with it.
Bill Banaszak wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer

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