Re: Japanese Colors...

in article snipped-for-privacy@enews4.newsguy.com, William L. Powell at snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote on 10/10/04 5:09 PM:

Try the link below for just about any question regarding Japanese aircraft of WWII and modeling.

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MB

Reply to
Milton Bell
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According to notes I've picked up from the 'Net, the perfect match for the metallic blue interior paint found on Japanese aircraft is Polly S Metalline #501994 Anodized Blue Metal. If you want the pale green-gray color, it's Aero Master Nakajima Interior Gray-Green.

Reply to
Guy N. LaFrance

I know about that one, but I think Aeromaster discontinued it like they did with the Mitsubushi Interior Green. I was wondering if there is something that more close to get....

William

Reply to
William L. Powell

in article snipped-for-privacy@enews2.newsguy.com, William L. Powell at snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote on 10/11/04 7:23 AM:

If you want to do the aotake?metallic blue/green?you can always paint a good natural metal such as alclad and over-spray with a transparent color. Tamiya makes good ones in blue and green so you can mix (or not) the shade you want. In some instances the color was blue or green and not always the same consistency. If you want, you can mix your own color with food coloring in Future. It actually works like the original aotake which was a transparent color painted over natural metal.

For the Mitsubishi color do a little research. In some cases it's not too far off the US Interior Green color, if my memory serves me.

Testors made an OD Green, 1164 I think, that was close to the color shown in the old Monogram profile on the Zero. This was back in the days of the old "square bottle" that held only a 1/4 oz of paint. The old days of modeling. The color is a little lighter than US interior green with a hint of blue.

HTH

MB

Reply to
Milton Bell

try here

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neil.

Reply to
mumbles

I don't believe any of these Mitsubishi colors are for interiors. Good paints but most are exterior colors.

MB

Reply to
Milton Bell

Reply to
Hub & Diane Plott III

AFAIK, those bottles are still available. The local AC Moore stocks them and I suppose the Michael's does as well.

Bill Banaszak, MFE

Reply to
Mad-Modeller

off the US Interior Green color, if my memory serves me. Testors made an OD Green, 1164 I think, that was close to the color shown in the old Monogram profile on the Zero The color is a little lighter than US interior green with a hint of blue.>

Great, so does that mean I have to repaint my Zeros that are almost done? I was told awhile back that the interior green was almost dead on to RAF interior green, so dats whut I used. Dammitol!!

When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. --Leonardo Da Vinci EAA # 729686 delete the word spam from email addy

Reply to
TimeTraveler658

Don't get yourself in a knot--Japanese interior colors in particular varied dramatically, from manufacturer to manufacturer, type to type and batch to batch. Whatever it is you did apply might very well be as accurate as any other possible choice. In fact, I wonder how many of us, given splotches of the following on white plastic, would be able to identify which was which without use of a color fan:

Verdi anticorrosione FS34272 British Interior Gray Green RLM 02 US interior green Kawasaki light khaki Mitsubishi light green French light green

The most accessible current source in print on this stuff is Ian K. Baker's Aviation History Colouring Books; volumes 36-40 cover Japanese aircraft. He might not have the last word on the subject, but he's got some very good ones.

Mark Schynert

Reply to
Mark Schynert

Did I hear the evocative thud of a gauntlet being thrown down? I think that would make a worthy exhibit-you going to the Nats in Atlanta? BTW, when did "Zinc chromate green" turn into "US interior green?" Cheers,

The Keeper (of too much crap!)

Reply to
Keeper

I'm not sure it did. But if U.S. Interior Green and Zinc Chromate green are the same thing, then so much the merrier.

Mark Schynert

Reply to
Mark Schynert

The Keeper (of too much crap!)>>

I thought it was the same too, just the technical name for a generic name--"a rose by any other name..." and all that. Or, in this case, "a cockpit by any other name would be as green" Double Dammitol!!

When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. --Leonardo Da Vinci EAA # 729686 delete the word spam from email addy

Reply to
TimeTraveler658

Surely, Zinc Chromate Green is not the same colour as US Interior Green. In all the accounts that I've read, Interior Green was described as a mixture of ZC Green and black. The description US is not part of the colour name. I'm sure it's used here simply to distinguish it from the British equivalent colour. I'm no expert, though.

Gordon McLaughlin

Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin

Here's how I remember it: During WWII aircraft manufacturers were instructed to make ZC Green by mixing ZC YELLOW ten parts to one part black. The term US interior green is misleading as bronze green and dull dark green were also used but in this case I'm sure we're referring to Zinc Chromate Green. hth

The Keeper (of too much crap!)

Reply to
Keeper

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