Re: Pressure suits.

I've seen a photo or two of a WWII German experimental pressure suit,
but it was for high altitude, as most pressure suits are. IIRC, it
looked like a '30s sci fi comic astro outfit, like you might see Buck
Rogers wear. I think it was similar to the early Mercury type astro
suits except "clunkier" looking with what apeared to be a metal, riveted
helmet. It has nothing to do with blacking out from Gs, but extreme
altitudes & this was aimed at some of their higher flying projects, kind
of the opposite for a Stuka.
Reply to
famvburg
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A pressure suit and a G-suit are not the same thing. And, in some cases I suppose a pilot could wear both. However, the pressure suit is generally used at very high altitude, like U2 or SR-71 altitudes.
A human with an oxygen mask, even at 100% O2, cannot breath above about 40,000 feet for any duration. Without a pressure suit he needs to 'pressure breath', where he constricts his chest on every breath, a tiresome process. So for very high altitude, he wears a pressure suit, which completely encases him in an airtight case that is 'inflated'.
A G-suit, used to prevent blood rushing to the legs and feet during high (positive) g maneuvers, is an inflatable bladder that only covers lower body and legs, and only inflates during the maneuvers.
Mike Keown wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer
Try this link:
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this one:
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You will find that history records the G-Suit was developed in Toronto by Dr Wilbur Franks.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Cuell
I'm not sure about the G-suit but many Stukas were equipped with a sort of automatic pilot which was triggered by the altimeter and pulled the plane out of the dive without pilot assistance. If the pilot blacked out from the G's the plane would still pull itself out of the dive. This autopilot was turned on by the pilot and set to the desired altitude before beginning the dive.
Reply to
me

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