My 2004 Multiple SP Install Experiment

I wanted to see if I could have separate individual
installs of SolidWorks 2004 on my computer so I
could have the different service packs available
at all times like I've always done in the past.
Being able to uninstall an SP is such a moot point
to me since hard disk space is cheap and plentiful.
Just install SolidWorks in a new folder and patch
that. What's the big deal? If you want to go back
to SP0, it's still on your computer. Just click on
the icon! Gee wiz!!
Of course the new Windows Installer prohibits this
ability so I decided to try some registry hacking.
Here is what I did and I don't recommend that any-
one do this on a work computer since I have no
idea what problems this can cause.
Note: I selected "New Installation" and enabled
"Customize" (so I could edit the install folders).
First I installed SW2004 in a folder called
"SolidWorks 2004 SP0" and for the common folder
I used "Solidworks Data 2004 SP0". I'm keeping
things separated in case future service packs
change something here.
Next I went into my registry and went to...
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products\
Once there I found a bunch of folders with
long names like "B6E129E41FFC10..."
I highlighted each one and looked for the one that
had "SolidWorks 2004" in the ProductName field
I right-clicked the folder and hit "Rename" and
added "OLD" to the end of it.
Once I did that I was able to pop my install CD in
and install a brand new installation. This time I
installed in folders called 2004 SP2 (I'm skipping
SP1 for now).
After a successful install, I ran the Service Pack
to upgrade the SP2 folder install to SP2.
Now I have two working installs of SolidWorks 2004
on my system! One is SP0 and the other is SP2.
I'm guessing that if I really want to uninstall
a previous version, I simply re-name the reg key
back to what it was, but I don't know if that will
work yet.
If anyone thinks I'm out of my mind, or if you see
something disastrous in all this, please let me know!
Mike Wilson
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Reply to
Mike J. Wilson
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Mike,
Does the second install create a registry entry with the same name as the first, to which you added "OLD"? If it does, you may cause confrusion for WI when you try to uninstall a particular installation.
Calvin
Reply to
CSN
Mike,
Thanks for sharing your newly discovered "workaround" for managing multiple installations of 2004 on a single computer / under a single O/S.
The Registry "hack" you performed will likely have no effect on anything other than SolidWorks and, although a simple edit, is not for the inexperienced.
The only problem I see is being disciplined enough to remember to "toggle" the Registry keys in order to make sure that future Windows Installer changes are applied to the proper copy of SolidWorks.
Per O. Hoel ______________________________________________________________________
> I wanted to see if I could have separate individual > installs of SolidWorks 2004 on my computer so I > could have the different service packs available > at all times like I've always done in the past. > > Being able to uninstall an SP is such a moot point > to me since hard disk space is cheap and plentiful. > Just install SolidWorks in a new folder and patch > that. What's the big deal? If you want to go back > to SP0, it's still on your computer. Just click on > the icon! Gee wiz!! > > Of course the new Windows Installer prohibits this > ability so I decided to try some registry hacking. > > Here is what I did and I don't recommend that any- > one do this on a work computer since I have no > idea what problems this can cause. > > Note: I selected "New Installation" and enabled > "Customize" (so I could edit the install folders). > > First I installed SW2004 in a folder called > "SolidWorks 2004 SP0" and for the common folder > I used "Solidworks Data 2004 SP0". I'm keeping > things separated in case future service packs > change something here. > > Next I went into my registry and went to... > HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products\ > > Once there I found a bunch of folders with > long names like "B6E129E41FFC10..." > > I highlighted each one and looked for the one that > had "SolidWorks 2004" in the ProductName field > > I right-clicked the folder and hit "Rename" and > added "OLD" to the end of it. > > Once I did that I was able to pop my install CD in > and install a brand new installation. This time I > installed in folders called 2004 SP2 (I'm skipping > SP1 for now). > > After a successful install, I ran the Service Pack > to upgrade the SP2 folder install to SP2. > > Now I have two working installs of SolidWorks 2004 > on my system! One is SP0 and the other is SP2. > > I'm guessing that if I really want to uninstall > a previous version, I simply re-name the reg key > back to what it was, but I don't know if that will > work yet. > > If anyone thinks I'm out of my mind, or if you see > something disastrous in all this, please let me know! > > Mike Wilson > > > > > > > ----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- >
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Reply to
Per O. Hoel
Personally, I think SWX was out of their mind when they forced this W.I. debacle on us. Nobody should have to resort to these regedit shenanigans.
M.T.
Reply to
Malcolm_Tempt
Mike,
Is it only me or is the who Windows Installer kind of ironic (in a sick twisted sort of way).
The windows installer was "forced" upon us in order to help users roll back SW service packs easier should some "issue" appear with the new release. A good thing.
Why would someone roll back a release - because a retro-bug was preventing them from getting their billable work done (Let's ignore the fact that the files aren't backward compatible between major SPR releases).
Now a simple install now takes up someones entire lunch time (okay - I'm fibbing a little - lunch time plus afternoon coffee break) is annoying enough.
Anyone who has production experience with software knows that you just don't install it and blindly turn it on - but perform a roll-out. This roll out requires you to work on test data (usually a copy of production data) in order to check for oh say retro-bugs. Blind faith will occasionally bring your operation to its knees and cause managers and others to start foaming at the mouth (not to mention irrate customers).
I am pretty sure SW tests its new versions (yes I know that is open for debate by some of the readers). And I'm pretty sure they have multiple versions on their machines so they can "flip" back and forth between versions while testing.
So, what's the point of this email?
SW, if anyone, knows the rational and good reasons for having multiple versions of the software on a computer. Given all the hash on this website regarding "issues" - you would think SW would do everything it could to ensure the SW champion in the company isn't standing in front of the who company with their shorts around their ankle come upgrade time.
All I'm asking for, is that SW Corporation extend the same courtesy to their customer as they do their developemnt team - without the need for people to resorting to publishing registry hacks.
Just my observations.
Len
> I wanted to see if I could have separate individual > installs of SolidWorks 2004 on my computer so I > could have the different service packs available > at all times like I've always done in the past. > > Being able to uninstall an SP is such a moot point > to me since hard disk space is cheap and plentiful. > Just install SolidWorks in a new folder and patch > that. What's the big deal? If you want to go back > to SP0, it's still on your computer. Just click on > the icon! Gee wiz!! > > Of course the new Windows Installer prohibits this > ability so I decided to try some registry hacking. > > Here is what I did and I don't recommend that any- > one do this on a work computer since I have no > idea what problems this can cause. > > Note: I selected "New Installation" and enabled > "Customize" (so I could edit the install folders). > > First I installed SW2004 in a folder called > "SolidWorks 2004 SP0" and for the common folder > I used "Solidworks Data 2004 SP0". I'm keeping > things separated in case future service packs > change something here. > > Next I went into my registry and went to... > HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products\ > > Once there I found a bunch of folders with > long names like "B6E129E41FFC10..." > > I highlighted each one and looked for the one that > had "SolidWorks 2004" in the ProductName field > > I right-clicked the folder and hit "Rename" and > added "OLD" to the end of it. > > Once I did that I was able to pop my install CD in > and install a brand new installation. This time I > installed in folders called 2004 SP2 (I'm skipping > SP1 for now). > > After a successful install, I ran the Service Pack > to upgrade the SP2 folder install to SP2. > > Now I have two working installs of SolidWorks 2004 > on my system! One is SP0 and the other is SP2. > > I'm guessing that if I really want to uninstall > a previous version, I simply re-name the reg key > back to what it was, but I don't know if that will > work yet. > > If anyone thinks I'm out of my mind, or if you see > something disastrous in all this, please let me know! > > Mike Wilson > > > > > > > ----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==---- >
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Reply to
Len K. Mar
Amen!
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Reply to
Mike J. Wilson
Totally. There was never a need (in my humble opinion) to "roll back" a service pack in the first place since you could have every version installed at the same time. Just point and click! What could be easier?
Mike
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Reply to
Mike J. Wilson
Good question. Here are some more observations...
The reg folder names are different for each Service Pack which means you can re-name them back to the way they were (once you apply the Service Pack) and they can all co-exist peacefully together.
If you re-install SolidWorks (at least on my system) the folder names are always the same for SP0.
Once you re-name the reg folders back to what they were, you will now have ALL versions of SolidWorks showing up under "Add/Remove Programs" which will allow (theoretically) the usual Modify/Repair or Remove options.
I'm still testing all of this so who knows what may occur later on. Hopefully there will be no Confucius between the installs.
Mike Wilson
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Reply to
Mike J. Wilson
That's ok. I reported the entire Windows Installer as a regression bug to SW tech support, since we lost functionality that used to work fine. Haven't got that spr number back yet...
"Mike J. Wilson" wrote in news:40085872_1@127.0.0.1:
Reply to
matt
That's right! I forgot you could submit something like that. We really did lose functionality.
Mike
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Reply to
Mike J. Wilson

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