Re: Which Way Would You Rather Modify This Part?

For months ignorant CADCAM idiot Tom Brewer insisted that a roll back
>bar was just fine and all I needed was more training.
No Jon, what I said was that you are a beginner having beginner
problems. I said for you to be specific and post samples/examples
where you were having difficulty and some of the more experienced
users would be willing to help you.
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
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Did you ever get and complete the myigetit SolidWorks video course?
[ From what I've seen of the free myigetit videos they do as well. I hope to finish the SolidProfessor videos I just purchased ( $600 Professional Package) in the next 2 weeks. When I do, I'll spend the $25 for the myigetit SolidWorks 2007 course ] -Jon Banquer- July 1, 2007
[ I'm trying to finish The SolidWorks Bible ]- Jon Banquer- Aug 8, 2007
[ SolidWorks has changed so much since I've been away from it and I feel like I'm really far behind. ]- Jon Banquer - Aug. 8, 2007
[ I prefer a rational discussion between people who really use the software. You prove on a regular basis that you can't be rational, and you have never said anything that makes me believe you have more than a passing familiarity with SolidWorks. ]-Matt Lombard- Author SolidWorks Bible
Reply to
brewertr
jon_banquer = Ignorant
" I dropped out of high school to pursue my dream of making a lot of money and never went back" -Jon Banquer -
It shows......
Reply to
brewertr
Jon,
Speaking of Ignorant, you still think there is no such thing as Chaining in GibbsCAM or SmartCAM?
[ You never chain geometry in Gibbs or SmartCAM. It's not necessary. ] - Jon Banquer - May 20, 2005
[ Create the elements in any order, and sequence them later, using modeling tools such as Chain. ] -SmartCAM Manual -
[ Jon did you even read Bob's post, the one you copied?
I can show you how the geometry in GibbsCAM is chained. Here you go, the program needs to know this as a minimum to chain:
1) profile start 2) profile end 3) direction 4) offset
So lets look at machining markers and what Bottle Bob describes:
1) start: "The white round marker is where the toolpath starts,"
2) end: "the black round marker is where it ends."
3) direction: "blue arrow is the direction"
4) offset: "they tell the tool to either go on the outside of the geometry, the inside of the geometry, OR centered on the geometry."
Now if BB clicks on the blue arrow and reverses it he just reversed the chain direction. If BB clicks on the white box and drags it to another position he just edited the chains start point.
You can call it "Chaining" (since that is the original widely accepted term) or you can call it "Machining Markers", hell you can even call it "Santa Clause" if you want as long as it tells the CAM program where the profile start, end, direction and offset is. All CAM programs have to know that information in order to calculate the offset tool path, by any other name it's still "chaining". ] -Brewertr-
Reply to
brewertr
Jon,
A customer gives you a solid model (the one in the video), a single part, from SolidWorks and you import it into any of the "Synchronous Technology" Programs available.
How do you determine original design intent?
Is design intent no longer a concern?
With the original constraints removed (as you claim synchronous technology does when importing models from other programs), when you start hacking and whacking the model, how do you a machinist or anyone else determine original design intent on that imported model, as well as fit, form and function when you start making changes?
How do you determine which (critical) dimensions on the imported model should be locked and which can be unlocked?
And while your at it, per your previous posts, what exactly does your engineering department do while you say you are hacking and whacking customer supplied models so they are easier for you to make?
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
Insignificant. Wholly and totally insignificant. I told you to quit whacking off before you addled yourself. Next time maybe you'll listen.
Reply to
jon's mom
Didn't we agree to that You should raise Your hand before answering any question here?
// Krister
Krister, Are you going to contribute to solidworks or just create noise?
Kenneth
Reply to
kenneth
Not sure abut that yet.....this forum is like the wild west at the moment....You're pickin on me and I'm pickin on cliff/jb....so we're even about the noise!!
No, You're right, I'll let the make them make the noise themself.........sorry :-)
// Krister
Reply to
Krister_L
Jon,
A customer gives you a solid model (the one in the video), a single part, from SolidWorks and you import it into any of the "Synchronous Technology" Programs available.
How do you determine original design intent?
Is design intent no longer a concern?
With the original constraints removed (as you claim synchronous technology does when importing models from other programs), when you start hacking and whacking the model, how do you a machinist or anyone else determine original design intent on that imported model, as well as fit, form and function when you start making changes?
How do you determine which (critical) dimensions on the imported model should be locked and which can be unlocked?
And while your at it, per your previous posts, what exactly does your engineering department do while you say you are hacking and whacking customer supplied models so they are easier for you to make?
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
I don't think I'd even want to do business with a customer that relies on their machining suppliers to modify their product designs.
How is a $50 part that I've dragged and dropped features all over, going to work with the rest of the $20,000 assembly it goes into at the manufacturer?
Reply to
Joe788
jonnies crazy jealousy towards Tom's skills versus his own severe limitations. Its not really a problem.....Its what makes this group so much fun. :)
jonnies just too nuts to comprehend. therein lies all the fun.
Barn
Reply to
barn_rubble

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